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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

1925 




SOMERVILLE PRINTING Co. 
1926 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 



Office of the City Auditor, 

January 28, 1926. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of 
Section 3 of Ordinance Number 44, I herewith submit a report 
of the expenditures and receipts during the year 1925, show- 
ing in detail the appropriation and expenditures and the re- 
ceipts from each source of income. Also a statement of the 
funded debt and temporary loans, table relative to maturities 
and interest, a balance sheet showing the assets and liabilities 
at the close of the fiscal year and a statement of the treas- 
urer's cash. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Howard E. Wemyss, 

City Auditor. 



4 ANNUAL REPORTS 

I hereby certify that in accordance with section 50 of 
chapter 41, General Laws as amended by chapter 33, Acts of 
1924, I have verified the treasurer's cash as of December 31, 
1925 by actual count, and have verified by reconciliation of 
the bank accounte the amounts on deposit in the banks as of 
the same date. 



The total cash balance December 3i, 1925 was $298,- 
507.19, as follows:— 



Somerville National Bank $109,265.76 

Old Colony Trust Company 44,020.53 

Commercial Security National Bank 68,813.51 

Somerville Trust Company, Benefits 16,186.71 

Somerville Trust Company, Teachers 39,811.74 

Highland Trust Company 16,826.00 

Cash in office 3,582.94 



$298,507.19 



/ further certify that in accordance with the require- 
ments of section 53 of said chapter 41 as amended by chapter 
33, Acts of 1924, I have examined the Trust Funds Securities 
in the hands of the city treasurer and find them to be cor- 
rect, as follows : — 



Caroline G. Baker Fund $300.00 

S. Newton Cutler School Fund 5,322.22 

S. Newton Cutler Library Fund 1,064.45 

Isaac Pitman Library Fund 5,314.58 

Olive C. Cummings Fund, Poor 1,751.45 
Frances A. Wilders Childrens Fund, 

Library 100.00 

Martha R. Hunt Fund, Library, Books 14,105.25 

Martha R. Hunt Fund, Library, Art 1,299.77 

Sarah Lorane Graves Fund 400.00 

$29,657.72 



CITY AUDITOR 5 

I further certify that I have examined the cash and ac- 
counts of the city clerk and have verified the cash on hand 
December 31, 1925 by actual count and find same to be cor- 
rect. 

Howard E. Wemtss 

January 28, 1926. 

Middlesex, s.s. 

Then personally appeared the above-named Howard E. 
Wemyss and made oath that the foregoing statement was cor- 
rect and true to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

Jason M. Carson, 

Justice of the Peace. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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8 ANNUAL REPORTS 

CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1925 
REVENUE 

Receipts 

General: — 

Taxes $2,906,266 39 

Corporation, Bank and Income Taxes.... 351,189 84 

Licenses and Permits 18,884 62 

Fines and Forfeits 19,270 93 

State, Boston Elevated Deficit 869 75 

State, Vocational School 11,990 42 

State, Continuation School 5,845 23 

State, Americanization 3,494 71 

State, Smith-Hughes Fund 3,316 14 

County of Middlesex, Dog Licenses 2,383 54 

South Middlesex Health Association .... 391 86 

Sale of Land 3,140 00 

Miscellaneous 611 07 



Special Assessments 

Departmental : — 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Charities 

Soldiers' Benefits 

School and School Buildings 

Libraries ..; 

Baths and Bathhouse 



115,640 24 

Water Department Accounts 306,118.24 

Interest on deposits, taxes, etc 26,374 81 

Temporary Loans 2,000,000 00 

Grade Crossings Account 429 57 

Sarah L. Graves Fund 400 00 

Refunds 3,624 00 





$3,327,654 50 




75,123 43 


8,374 81 




3,208 95 




13,308 48 




18,980 24 




47,959 70 




8,333 25 




12,331 55 




2,414 11 




729 15 





Total receipts $5,855,364 79 

Balance at beginning of period 260,793 32 

$6,116,158 11 



CITY AUDITOR 9 

CASH STATEMENT, DECMBER 31, 1925 — Continued 

Payments 

Appropriations $3,118,104 15 

Income of Trust Funds 4,960 52 

Trust Funds, Permanent 699 77 

Temporary Loans 2,000,000 00 

Tax Titles 162 08 

Comm. of Mass. Taxes and Assessments .... 387,350 66 

County of Middlesex, Tax 144,324 14 

Cash Advance, Soldiers' Benefits 100 00 

Tellers Overs and Shorts 76 16 

Refunds 631 42 

Total Payments $5,656,408 90 

Transfer to Non-Revenue 201,210 21 

Balance on hand 258,539 00 

$6,116,158 11 
NON-REVENUE 

Receipts 

Sewer Loan $60,000 00 

Highway Loan 125,000 00 

Liquor Fees for Commonwealth 5 00 

Redemption of Tax Titles 4,655 12 

Refunds 701 42 

Total Receipts $190,361 54 

Transfer from Revenue 201,210 21 

Balance at beginning of period 75,417 44 

$466,989 19 
Payments 

Appropriations $422,360 63 

Redemption of Tax Titles 4,655 12 

Liquor Fees to Comm. of Mass 5 25 

Total Payments $427,021 00 

Balance on hand 39,968 19 

$466,989 19 
Summary 

Total Revenue Receipts $5,855,364 79 

Total Non-Revenue Receipts 190,361 54 

$6,045,726 33 
Total balance at beginning of period 336,210 76 

$6,381,937 09 

Total Revenue Payments $5,656,408 90 

Total Non-Revenue Payments 427,021 00 

$6,083,429 90 
Total balance on hand 298,507 19 

$6,381,937 09 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 





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CITY AUDITOR 25 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Payments 

State Tax $189,480 00 

State Highway Tax 791 50 

Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 109,022 32 

Metropolitan Parks Assessment 72,073 09 

Wellington Bridge Assessment 2,154 16 

Charles River Basin Assessment 9,887 75 

Alewife Brook Assessment 997 43 

Abatement of Smoke Assessment 417 21 

Fire Prevention Assessment 1,140 94 

Division Metropolitan Planning Assess- 
ment 1,085 91 

Soldiers' Exemption Assessment 300 35 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 138,498 07 

Liquor License Fees 5 25 

Refund National Bank Tax 1923 2 45 



$525,856 43 



Receipts 

Corporation Taxes 1925 $97,454 28 

Corporation Taxes, Prior Years 5 ,114 14 

Income Taxes 1925 221,500 29 

Income Taxes Prior Years 11,347 00 

National Bank Tax 1925 2,443 25 

National Bank Tax Prior Years 6 57 

Street Railway Tax 13,324 31 

Pedlers' State License 350 00 

Boxing Licenses 284 62 

Vocational School 11.990 42 

Continuation School 5,845 23 

Americanization 3,494 71 

Smith-Hughes Fund 3,316 14 

In Lieu of Taxes 83 05 

State Aid 6,296 00 

Military Aid 1,917 25 

Soldiers' Burials 120 00 

Division of the Blind 500 00 

General Aid to Poor 12,625 58 

Mothers' Aid 18,825 80 

Tuition State Wards 2,162 46 

Diseases Dangerous to Health 624 43 

Account Grade Crossings 103 41 



$419,728 94 



26 ANNUAL REPORTS 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX 

Payment 

County Tax $144,324 U 

Receipt 
Dog Licenses 2,383 54 

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES 

Revenue 

Total taxes as per assessors' commitments $2,932,282 52 

Less State Taxes $190,271 50 

County Tax ..' 144,324 14 

Overlay 27,060 36 



361,656 00 

Amount raised for municipal purposes.... $2,570,626 52 

Other Revenue: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: — 

Income Tax 1922, Excess $810 50 

Income Tax 1923, Excess 4,052 50 

Income Tax 1924, Excess 6,484 00 

Income Tax 1925 221,500 29 

Corporation Taxes, Prior Years 5,114 14 

Corporation Taxes 1925 97,454 28 

National Bank Tax, Prior Years 6 57 

National Bank Tax 1925 2,443 25 

Boston Elevated Railway Deficit 869 75 

Revenue from Taxes, Supplementary 

Warrants 487 59 

South Middlesex Health Association 391 86 

Tax 1921, Bankrupt case 2 00 

Special Excise Tax < . 18 77 

Estimated Revenue $553,760 00 

Excess 44,873 43 598,633 43 



Appropriations from Excess and De- 
ficiency 47,760 00 



986,028 93 



Total Revenue $3,556,655 45 

Expenses 

General Appropriations $3,102,050 79 

Outlay Appropriations 167,260 00 

Metropolitan and Other Assessments 197,079 16 

Tellers Overs and Shorts 76 16 



3,466,466 11 
Excess of Revenue $90,189 34 



CITY AUDITOR 



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28 ANNUAL REPORTS 



FUNDED DEBT 

The funded debt of the city January 1, 1925 was 
$1,579,000.00. Loans amounting to $185,000.00 were issued, 
$125,000.00 for Permanent Pavement and $60,000.00 for 
Sewers Construction. Maturities amounting to $151,000.00 
were paid. The total debt December 31, 1925 was $1,613,- 
000.00. 

Classified Debt January 1, 1925: — 

City Loan $130,000 00 

City Hall Additions Loan 142,000 00 

Sewer Loan 144,000 00 

Public Building Loan 175,000 00 

Highway Loan 155,000 00 

Schoolhouse Loan 800,000 00 

Bridge Loan 25,000 00 

Total within limit $1,571,000 00 

Sewer Loan $3,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Loan 5,000 00 

Total outside limit 8,000 00 



Total funded debt $1,579,000 06 

Loans increasing the debt: — 

Highway Loan $125,000 00 

Sewer Loan 60,000 00 



$185,000 00 



Maturities reducing the debt: — 

City Loan $23,000 00 

City Hall Additions Loan 8,000 00 

Sewer Loan 17,000 00 

Public Building Loan 18,000 00 

Highway Loan 35,000 00 

Bridge Loan 1,000 00 

Schoolhouse Loan 45,000 00 



Total within limit $147,000 00 

Sewer Loan $3,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Loan 1,000 00 



Total outside limit 4,000 00 



Total maturities $151,000 00 



CITY AUDITOR 



29 



Classified debt December 31, 1925: — 

City Bonds ZYs% $4,000 00 

City Bonds 4% 103,000 00 

City Hall Additions Bonds 4% 64,000 00 

City Hall Additions Bonds 4*4% 70,000 00 

Sewer Bonds 3V 2 % 32,000 00 

Sewer Bonds 4% 137,000 00 

Sewer Bonds 4%% 18,000 00 

Public Building Bonds 4% 107,000 00 

Public Building Bonds 4*4% 50,000 00 

Highway Bonds 4V 2 % 16,000 00 

Highway Bonds 4% 168,000 00 

Highway Bonds 3V 2 % 6,000 00 

Highway Bonds 5% 55,000 00 

Schoolhouse Bonds 4% 755,000 00 

Bridge Bonds 3y 2 % 24,000 00 

Total within limit $1,609,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Bonds 3*&% 4,000 00 

Total outside limit 4,000 00 

— * 

Total funded debt $1,613,000 00 



The debt per capita December 31, 1925 was $16.26. 
The ratio of debt to valuation was 1.54%. The ratio of debt to 
tax income was 55.4%. The tax rate per $1000. valuation, 
on account of reduction of funded debt in 1925 was $1.44. 

TAXES 

The total taxable property as of April 1, 1925 was 
$104,769,800. The tax rate was fixed at $27.40 per $1,000. 
valuation. 



State Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 

Metropolitan Park Assessment 

Wellington Bridge Assessment 

Charles River Basin Assessment 

Alewife Brook Assessment 

Abatement of Smoke Assessment 

Fire Prevention Assessment 

Division Metropolitan Planning Assess- 
ment ^ 

County Tax 

City Budget 

Overlay 

Total amount raised 



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$189,480 

791 

109,022 32 

72,073 09 

2,154 16 

9,887 75 



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417 21 

1,140 94 

1,085 91 

144,324 14 

-3,-246,870 00 

27,060 36 

$3,805,304 81 



30 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Less Estimated Revenue $553,760 00 

State Income Tax 186,762 29 

Corporation Tax 90,000 00 

National Bank Tax 2,500 00 

Poll Taxes 61,590 00 

Appropriation from Excess and De- 
ficiency 40,000 00 



934,612 29 



Net amount assessed in taxes $2,870,692 52 

Special Assessments : — 

Street Sprinkling $46,036 26 

Apportioned Betterment Assessments 62 35 

Committed Sidewalk Assessment 82 05 

Apportioned Betterment Assessments, In- 
terest 18 12 

Committed Interest Sidewalk Assessment 4 35 



46,203 13 

Total commitment $2,916,895 65 

Appropriations, classified under general headings, were 
made from revenue, as follows: — 

General Government $150,635 00 

Protection of Persons and Property 539,620 00 

Health and Sanitation 332,325 00 

Highways 328,925 00 

Charities 125,750 00 

Soldiers' Benefits 38,130 00 

Education 1,027,500 00 

Libraries 71,295 00 

Recreation 38,750 00 

Unclassified 73,440 00 

Municipal Indebtedness 253,000 00 

Water Works 267,500 00 

Total Appropriations $3,246,870 00 

Less estimated receipts and appropriation 

from excess and deficiency - 873,022 29 

Raised by taxation for city purposes $2,373,847 71 



CITY AUDITOR 



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CITY AUDITOR 35 

BORROWING CAPACITY DECEMBER 31, 1925 

Valuation 1923 $92,519,400 00 

Supplementary 9,000 00 

$92,528,400 00 

Valuation 1924 99,311,000 00 

Supplementary 6,500 00 

$99,317,500 00 

Valuation 1925 104,769,800 00 

Supplementary 12,600 00 



$104,782,400 00 



Total three years $296,628,300 00 

Abatements 1923 $481,487 00 

Abatements 1924 549,625 00 

Abatements 1925 406,300 00 

$1,437,412 00 



$295,190,888 00 

Average valuation for three years 98,396,962 66 

Two and one-half per cent 2,459,924 06 

Present debt within limit 1,609,000 00 



Borrowing capacity December 31 1925.... $850,924 06 

Maturities in 1926: — 

January 1 $29,000 00 

April 1 64,000 00 

July 1 $42,000 00 

Less Outside Limit 1,000 00 41,000 00 

October 1 21,000 00 



$155,000 00 
$1,005,924 06 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS 

ABATEMENTS SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS PRIOR YEARS 

Charges: 

Street Sprinkling 1924 $10 32 

Credit: 

Excess and Deficiency $10 32 

WATER CHARGES 1924 ABATED 

Charges : 

Abatements $81 63 

Credit: 

Excess and Deficiency $81 63 

TELLERS OVERS AND SHORTS 

Charges: 

Shortages adjusted $76 16 

Credit: 

Appropriation from Revenue $76 16 

STATE INCOME TAXES 
Credit: 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1922 $810 50 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1923 4,052 50 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1924 6,484 00 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1925 221,500 29 

$232,847 29 

Charges : 

Estimate 1925 $186,762 29 

Revenue 1925 46,085 00 

$232,847 29 

CORPORATION TAXES 

Credit: 
Cash from Commonwealth, Account 

Prior Years $5,114 14 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1925 97,454 28 

$102,568 42 

Charges: 

Esitimte 1925 $90,000 00 

Revenue 1925 12,568 42 

■ $102,568 42 

NATIONAL BANK TAX 

Credit: 
Cash from Commonwealth, Account 

Prior Years $6 57 

Cash from Commonwealth, Account 1925 2,443 25 

Revenue Deficit 50 18 

$2,500 00 

Charges : 

Estimate 1925 $2,500 00 



CITY AUDITOR 37 

SALE OF LAND 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $737 68 

Cash, sale of land Beacon Street 2,800 00 

Cash, sale of land Elm Street 340 00 

$3,877 68 

Charges : 
Appropriated for Outlay Purpose 1,500 00 

Balance to 1926 account $2,377 68 

TAX TITLES 

Charges : 

Balance from 1924 account $1,402 80 

Taxes 1924 162 08 

Balance to 1926 account $1,564 88 

GRADE CROSSINGS ADVANCES 

Charges : 

Balance from 1924 account $477 30 

Credit: 

Cash, Boston Elevated Railway $15 91 

Cash, Boston and Maine Railroad 310 25 

Cash, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.. 103 41 
Appropriation from Excess and De- 
ficiency 47 73 

$477 30 

TAILINGS 

Credit: 
Balance from 1924 account $291 65 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS 

Credit: 
Cash, bond issue of July 1 $1,438 89 

SURPLUS WAR BONUS FUND 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $46,598 "06 

Charges : 

Appropriation for Outlay Purposes $46,598 06 

REVENUE FROM TAXES, SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANTS 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $545 55 

Supplementary Warrants, 1925 627 24 

$1,172 79 

Charges : 

Abatements $57 96 

Collections credited to Revenue 1925 487 59 

545 55 

Balance to 1926 account 627 24 



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Charges : 

Abatements $402 60 

Overlay Reserve 392 48 



195,709 14 



38 ANNUAL REPORTS 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS RESERVED 

Charges : 

Balance from 1924 account $12,930 31 

Street Sprinkling Assessment 46,036 26 

Highway Betterment Assessments 23,982 00 

Sidewalk Assessments 6,645 73 

Sewer Assessments 6,114 84 

Charges : 

Committed Sidewalk Assessment 1924 $82 05 

Apportioned Betterment Assessments 

1923 62 35 

Abated Sidewalk Assessments 1925 411 84 

Collections credited to Estimated Rev- 
enue 75,232 69 

75,788 93 

Balance to 1926 account $19,920 21 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 

Credit: 

Cash received $4,655 12 

Charges : 

Cash paid, titles redeemed $4,655 12 

OVERLAY ACCOUNTS 

Overlay 1921 
Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $12 44 

Charges: 

Abatements $12 44 

Overlay 1922 ■ 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $50 60 

Charges : 

Abatements $45 60 

Overlay Reserve 5 00 

$50 60 

Overlay 1923 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $785 08 

Taxes paid after abatement 10 00 



$795 08 



$795 08 



CITY AUDITOK 3& 

Overlay 1924 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $15,421 17 

Taxes paid after abatement 9 74 

$15,430 91 

Charges: 

Abatements $6,591 58 

Overlay Reserve 8,504 89 

15,096 47 

Balance to 1926 account $334 44 

Overlay 1925 

Credit: 

Taxes 1925 $27,060 36 

Taxes paid after abatement 4 00 

$27,064 36 

Charges: 

Abatements 12,180 62 

Balance to 1926 account $14,883 74 

RESERVE FUND, SURPLUS FROM OVERLAYS 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $14,383 46 

Overlay 1922 Surplus 5 00 

Overlay 1923 Surplus 392 48 

Overlay 1924 Surplus 8,504 89 

Balance to 1926 account $23,285 83 

EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY 

Credit: 

Balance from 1924 account $57,876 83 

Refunds 1924 accounts 179 60 

Revenue Excess 1925 90,189 34 

$148,245 77 

Charges: 

General Appropriations $40,500 00 

Outlay Appropriations 7,260 00 

Appropriation, Grade Crossings 47 73 

Adjustment Military Aid account 1924.... 25 00 

Adjustment Accounts Receivable 1924.... 60 00 

Adjustment National Bank Tax 1923.... 2 45 
Abatements Special Assessments, Prior 

Years 10 32 

Water Charges 1924 Abated 81 63 

$47,987 13 

Balance to 1926 account $100,258 64 



40 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



CLASSIFICATION OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



Receipts 
General Revenue 

Taxes: — 

Taxes 1925 $2,485,652 11 

Taxes 1924 420,221 80- 

Taxes 1923 387 48 

Taxes 1922 5 00 

From State: — 

Corporations, Prior Years 5,114 14 

Corporations, 1925 97,454 28 ' 

National Bank, Prior Years 6 57 

National Bank 1925 2,443 25 

Street Railway 1925 13,324 31 

Income, Prior Years 11,347 00 

Income, 1925 , 221,500 29 

Boston Elevated Railway Deficit 869 75 

Excise Tax, Ship Owners 26 02 

Licenses and Permits: — 
Licenses: — 

Dealers in Motor Vehicles 775 00 

Amusements 1,128 00 

Junk 750 00 

Milk 515 00 

Pool, Billiards and Bowling 312 00 

Sunday 1,369 00 

Innholders and Victuallers 206 00 

Pedlers 1,338 00 

All Other 1,675 50 

Permits :- 

Marriage 1,448 00 

Buildings 3,490 00 

Electrical Department 4,347 50 

All Other 1,530 62 

Fines and Forfeits: — 

Court Fines 18,972 93 

Departmental Penalties 298 00 

Grants and Gifts: — 

From State: — 

Vocational School 11,990 42 

Continuation School 5,845 23 

Smith-Hughes Fund 3,316 14 

Americanization 3,494 71 

From County: — 

Dog Licenses 2,383 54 

From Individuals: — 

South Middlesex Health Association.... 391 86 



CITY AUDITOR 41 

All Other General Revenue: — 

Sale of Land 3,140 00 * 

State, in Lieu of Taxes 83 05 

Electrolysis 500 00 

Bankrupt, 1921 Tax 2 00 

Total General Revenue $3,327,654 50 



Commercial Revenue — Special Assessments 

For Expenses: — 

Street Sprinkling 1925 $38,685 92 

Street Sprinkling 1924 7,096 68 

For Outlays: — 

Sewers 1925 3,136 68 

Sewers 1924 1,655 00 

Sidewalks 1925 2,168 14 

Sidewalks 1924 2,022 11 

Street Betterments 1925 11,345 50 

Street Betterments 1924 8,869 00- 

Committed Sidewalk 1924 82 05 

Apportioned Betterments 1923 62 35^ 

Total Commercial Revenue — 

Special Assessments $75,123 43 



Commercial Revenue — Departmental 

General Government: — 

Treasurer, — fees $995 35 

costs 5,033 82 

Assessors 4 75 

City Clerk 2,334 54 

Engineering 6 35 

Protection of Persons and Property: — 

Police, — Rent of Court Room 765 00 

Miscellaneous 560 54 

Fire, — Sale of Old Materials 180 60 

All Other 872 09 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 830 72 

Health and Sanitation: — 

Contagious Hospital 5,534 75 

Health Department 1,590 93^ 

Inspection of Milk 2,288 00^ 

Collection of Ashes and Waste 2,856 80 

Incinerator 400 00 

Sanitary Buildings 638 00 



42 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Highways: — 

Labor and Materials 18,464 60 

Sidewalks Maintenance 71 08 

Sidewalks Construction 429 56 

Street Sprinkling 15 00 

Charities: — 

Almshouse: — 

Sale of Produce, etc 2,831 92 

Board 4,552 68 

Outside Reliefs- 
Individuals 299 00 

Cities and Towns 6,080 64 

State 12,625 58 

Mothers' Aid: — 

Cities and Towns 2,744 08 

State 18,825 80 

Soldiers' Benefits: — 

State Aid 6,296 00 

Military Aid 1,917 25 

Soldiers' Burials 120 00 

Education: — 

Tuition, State Wards 2,162 46 

Other Tuition 8,851 27 

School Department, Miscellaneous 56 39 

Rent High School Hall 575 00 

School Buildings 686 43 

Libraries: — 

Pines, lost books, etc 2,406 84 

Buildings 7 27 

Recreation: — 

Shower Baths 478 05 

Bathhouse 251 10 

Total Commercial Revenue — Depart- 
mental $115,640 24 

Commercial Revenue — Public Service Enterprises 

Water Department: — 

Sale of Water: — 

Metered 1925 $245,545 09 

Metered 1924 32,297 14 

Annual 6,906 33 

Additional 1,599 91 

Service Assessments 12,417 97 

Maintenance Bills 7,351 80 

Total Commercial Revenue — Public 
Service Enterprises $306,118 24 



CITT AUDITOR 43 

Commercial Revenue — Interest 

Deposits, City Treasurer $10,381 91 

Deposits, City Clerk 8 39 

Taxes 14,593 82 

Special Assessments 234 63 

Apportioned Assessments 22 47 

Trust Funds: — 

School 228 75 

Library 829 79 

Poor 75 05 

Total Commercial Revenue — Inter- 
est $26,374 81 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Temporary Loans:— $2,000,000 00 

General Loans: — 

Sewer 60,000 00 

Highway 125,000 00 

Total Municipal Indebtedness $2,185,000 00 

Agency, Trust and Investment 

Agency: — 

Liquor Licenses for State $5 00 * 

Redemption of Tax Titles 4,655 12 S 

Grade Crossings 429 57 

Trust and Investment: — 

Sarah Lorane Graves Funds 400 00 

Total Agency, Trust and Investment $5,489 69 

Refunds 

General Appropriations $1,005 51 

General Appropriations, Account Prior 

Years 179 60 

Outlay Appropriations 701 42 

Accrued Interest 1,438 89 

Advance, Soldiers' Benefits 100 00 

Soldiers' Benefits 900 00 

Total Refunds $4,325 42 



Total Receipts $6,045,726 33 



44 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Board of Aldermen Expenses 

Books, postage and supplies 106 37 

Printing and advertising.... 226 50 

Refreshments 883 75 

Badges 21 10 

Special Items: — 

Gavel 19 81 

Stenographic service .... 51 00 

Flowers 42 00 

Transportation 14 00 



Clerk of Committees Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Clerk 

Assistant Clerk 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

All other 



Executive Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Mayor 

Secretary 

Clerks 

Other Expenses: — 

Auto Maintenance 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

Contingent Expenses .... 

All other 

Auditing Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Auditor 

Clerks 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

Binding 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Typewriter 



EXPENDITURES 
General Government 

Expenses Outlays 



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2,200 


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800 


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104 


90 


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1,364 53 



3,207 43 



9,143 84 



6,877 76 



CITY AUDITOR 



Treasury Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Treasurer and Collector 

Deputy Collector 

Cashiers 

Clerks 

Tax Investigator 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

Bonds 

Car Hire 

All other 

Special Items: — 

Typewriters 

Convention Expenses.... 

Check Endorser 

Perforator 



Assessors' Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Chairman 

Assessors 

Assistant Assessors 

Clerks (Office) 

Clerks (Street) 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Carfares, Disbursements 
and Auto Hire 

Telephones 

All other 



Licensing Commission 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioners 

Secretary 

Inspector 

Clerk 

Assistant 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 



3,000 00 

5,091 67 

1,650 00 

8,289 59 

550 00 



1,045 79 
4,251 15 

38 86 
52 55 
69 76 



900 00 
300 00 
200 00 
852 92 
240 00 



131 68 



Expenses 



45 

Outlays 



4,000 


00 




2,200 


00 




2,781 


45 




10,524 


30 




275 


00 




3,098 


80 




907 


13 




153 


87 




317 


73 




11 


50 




116 


44 




283 


00 




78 


31 




190 


00 




163 


00 


25,100 53 



/ 



24,039 37 



2,624 60 






4C> ANNUAL REPORTS 



Pedlers' License Commision 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 14 75 

Printing 9 50 



Registration of City Laborers 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Registration Clerk 450 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Stationery and postage 12 25 



Law Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Inspector 


2,800 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 






Carried forward 


3,900 00 



Expenses Outlays 



24 25 



Certification of Notes and Bonds 

Certifying 550 00 / 

550 00 



City Clerk's Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

City Clerk 3,800 00 

Assistant City Clerk 2,200 00 

Clerks 4,232 92 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 554 44 

Printing and advertising 193 81 

Binding 26 00 

Equipment and repairs.... 47 23 

Telephone 158 19 

All other 26 30 

Special Item: — 

Typewriters 101 25 

11,340 14 



462 25 



CITY AUDITOR 



47 



Brought forward 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Recording 

Clerical Hire 

Telephone 

Service Fees 

All other 



3,900 00 



Expenses 



Outlays 



68 


00 


66 


18 


1 


00 


160 


00 


30 


00 


56 


28 


34 


25 



4,315 71 



/ 



City Messenger's Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Messenger 2,400 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Stationery and postage 2 00 

Auto Maintenance 808 40 

Telephone 23 62 

Carfares 11 40 



3,245 42 



Engineering Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

City Engineer 

Assistants 

Clerks 

Other Expenses: — 

Supplies, printing and 
postage 

Telephone 

Auto Maintenance 

Instruments and equip- 
ment 

Carfares 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Maps 



4,000 00 
7,601 34 
1,177 50 



253 78 
115 42 
810 16 

97 45 

289 66 

6 47 



70 53 



14,422 31 



-, 



Public Buildings Department, 
Commissioner of Public Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioner 3,300 00 

Inspector of Plumbing 2,100 00 

Clerks 2,498 01 

Carried forward 7,898 01 



48 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 7,898 01 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies 319 36 

Printing and advertising 156 50 

Binding 35 00 

Telephone 163 77 

Auto Maintenance 625 00 

All other 28 41 

Special Items: — 

Adding Machine 242 25 

Revising Building Ord- 
inance 525 00 

Typewriter 71 25 



Public Buildings Department, 
Maintenance Municipal Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitors 5,965 78 

Labor 3,258 95 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel and Light 2,025 29 

Furniture and furnish- 
ings 2,417 34 

Janitor supplies 166 08 

Repairs to buildings .„. 705 65 

Plumbing and supplies 582 52 

Hardware and materials 294 92 

Ice 171 35 

All other 114 65 

Special Items: — 

Moving Safes 48 00 

Drawings for Memorial 

Building 200 00 

Ventilators 142 50 

Guard for windows 103 95 

Concrete steps 267 50 

Office signs 135 35 

Portrait Mayor Webster 250 00 



City Hall Additions 

Construction Contract .... 1,114 36 

Architect Contract 242 14 

Heating and Ventilating 

Contract 1,537 95 



Expenses Outlays 



10,064 55 



16,849 83 



Carried forward 2,894 45 



CITY AUDITOR 49 



Brought forward 2,894 45 

Equipment and Supplies 891 37 

Tower Clock 197 90 

Grading Grounds 122 53 

Walks and Steps 1,299 93 

Retaining wall and steps 4,534 00 

Fire Escape 2,125 00 

Ashes 3 00 

Flag Pole 735 00 

Changing Vent Fan 129 00 

Letter Box 180 00 



City Planning Board 

Contracting work, zoning 

Telephone 

Clerical Service 

Expenses to Convention 

Printing and advertising.... 

Other Supplies 

Catering 

Special Item: — 

Framing 



Election Expenses, City Clerk 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Clerks $600 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment, supplies, sta- 
tionery and postage.... 54 22 
Printing and advertising 1,027 55 
Carfares and auto hire.... 180 00 

Refreshments 17 75 

Repairs ballot boxes 75 

Special Item: — 
Maps 120 00 



7,032 


37 


25 


20 


90 


95 


58 


00 


42 


00 


122 


30 


164 


25 


230 


00 



Election Expenses, Registrars of 
Voters 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Registrars 

Clerks 

Other Expenses: — 

Stationery and Postage 

and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Refreshments 

Car hire 

Registers 

Posting 



1,260 


00 


1,910 


17 


194 


85 


1,466 


19 


45 


00 


36 


41 


149 


00 


35 


16 



Expenses Outlays 



13,112 18 



7,765 07 



2,000 27 



5,096 78 



50 ANNUAL REPORTS 

_, . Expenses Outlays 

Election Expenses, Pay of Election 

Officers 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Wardens 552 00 

Inspectors 2,070 00 

Clerks 552 00 



3,174 00 



Public Buildings Department, 
Maintenance Polling Places 

Labor 

Teaming 

Fuel and Light 

Rent Halls 

Repairs buildings 

Hardware and materials .... 



Police Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Chief 

Captains and Lieuten- 
ants 

Sergeants and Inspec- 
tors 

Patrolmen 

Special Police 

Matrons 

Other employees 

Equipment and Repairs: — 

Motorcycle and auto 

maintenance 

New Equipment 

Equipment for men 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 
and supplies 

Care of prisoners 

Telephone 

Laundry 

Travel and disburse- 
ments 

Reimbursements for in- 
juries, etc 

Convention expenses 

Trucking 

All other 

Special Items: — 

Peerless 

Patrol 

Detective Service 



313 


48 


120 


00 


15 


55 


65 


00 


12 


02 


48 


20 



574 25 



3,300 


00 


15,250 


00 


13,500 

178,395 

2,000 

1,139 

7,023 


00 
69 
20 

80 
36 


2,671 
113 
464 


43 
40 
10 


385 

328 

538 

92 


09 
63 
33 
10 


1,156 


61 


246 
50 

85 
31 


10 
00 
51 
76 


500 

4,347 

347 


00 
50 
92 
— 231,967 53 



Public Buildings Department, 
Maintenance Police Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitors 2,485 79 

Labor 261 28 

Maintenance of Buildings: — 

Fuel and Light 1,589 10 

Janitors' supplies 63 65 

Furniture and furnish- 
ings 270 01 

Repairs to buildings 45 94 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 1 95 

Plumbing and supplies.... 49 70 

Hardware and materials 126 42 

Ice 44 85 

All other 32 00 

Special Item: — 

Insurance 96 54 



CITY AUDITOR 51 

Expenses Outlays 



Fire Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Chief Engineer 


3,300 00 


Assistant Engineer 


2,750 00 


Firemen 


240,440 12 


Equipment and Repairs: — 




Apparatus and equip- 




ment 


5,526 67 


Hose 


1,174 61 


Equipment for men 


148 35 


Power 


8 79 


Hardware, tools, etc 


285 16 


All other 


55 49 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, printing, postage 




and supplies 


100 24 


Telephone 


820 26 


Janitors' supplies 


375 43 


Furnishings 


140 24 


Laundry work 


502 15 


Ice 


122 55 


Reimbursements 


318 35 


All other 


58 69 


Supplies: — 






176 45 


Gasoline 


934 27 


Soda and acid 


314 99 


Special Items: — 




Convention Expenses .... 


170 39 


Buick 


295 00 







5,067 23 



258,018 20 



52 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Public Buildings Department, 
Maintenance Fire Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Labor 


819 

6,307 

190 
56 

161 
794 
382 
132 
24 

455 

360 
398 
235 


44 


Other Expenses: — 

Fuel and light 

Furniture and furnish- 
ings 


94 

64 


Repairs to buildings .... 
Heating apparatus and 

Plumbing supplies 


24 

40 
47 


Hardware and materials 
Janitors' supplies 


40 
66 


All other 

Special Items: — 

Installing boiler and 
heater 


90 

30 
00 


Insurance 


31 




00 



Expenses 



Outlays 



10,318 70 



Weights and Measures 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Sealer 

Assistant 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, stationery and 

postage 

Printing and advertising 
Equipment and supplies 

Telephone 

Auto maintenance 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Installing markers 



1,900 


00 


1,460 


67 


42 


60 


23 


75 


193 


17 


42 


33 


269 


88 


1 


03 


28 


98 



3,962 41 



Electrical Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioner 

Assistant Inspector .. 

Clerk 

Labor 

Other Expenses: — 
Fire Alarm System.. 
Police Signal System 
Auto maintenance .... 
Telephone 

Carried forward 



2,800 


00 


1,288 


00 


940 


18 


13,413 


75 


1,199 


55 


311 


32 


925 


21 


174 


38 


21,052 


39 



CITY AUDITOR 53 



Brought forward 21,052 39 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies 229 44 

All other 51 74 

Special Item: — 

Inspection Service 2,198 85 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Electrical Department Buildings 

Janitor 1,118 00 

Fuel 699 95 

Light 30 15 

Furniture and furnishings 2 25 

Janitors' supplies 7 50 

All other 91 

Special Item: — 

Insurance 63 23 



Underground Construction 

Cable and Wires 647 44 

Connections to fire boxes.... 45 12 

Posts 283 50 

Reels 36 00 

Shell Castings 173 75 



Highways, Suppression of Moths 

Labor 3,975 64 

Hired teams and trucks.... 343 01 

Hardware, tools and equip- 
ment 59 70 

Insecticides 200 08 

Other materials and sup- 
plies 75 04 

Spraying 95 00 



Highway Department, Care of Trees 

Printing, stationery / and 

postage 3 25 

Labor 4,351 00 

Teams and trucks 664 40 

Equipment and tools 153 48 

Lumber and materials 246 84 

Use of steam roller 45 50 

Insecticides 3 50 



Expenses Outlays 



23,532 42 



1,921 99 



1,185 81 



4,748 47 



5,467 97 



54 ANNUAL REPORTS 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Expenses Outlays 

Health Department 

General Administration: — 

Agent 1,800 00 

Clerks 3,174 50 

Medical Inspector and 

Bacteriologist 2,750 00 

Acting Medical Inspec- 
tor 68 57 

Technician 331 42 

Health Nurses 3,900 00 

Books, printing and 

postage 417 86 

Carfares, etc 351 61 

Telephone 370 54 

Quarantine and Contagious Diseases: 

Cities and Towns 2,987 67 

State 19 30 

Other Institutions 758 30 

Groceries 48 00 

Tuberculosis: — 

Board and Treatment: — 

Cities and Towns 3,883 09 

State 7,843 51 

Other Institutions 182 00 

Groceries and Provisions 764 14 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment and supplies 70 14 

Medicine and Medical at- 
tendance 19 17 

Auto and ambulance 

maintenance 627 13 

Burying dead animals.... 124 00 

All other 14 95 

Ice 75 96 

30,581 86 

City Clerk's Department, Vital Statistics 

Canvassing and reporting 

births 750 80 

Reporting deaths 129 00 

Postage and supplies 57 22 

Printing and advertising.. 35 00 

972 02 

Contagious Hospital 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Matron 1,083 30 

Nurses and other help 9,582 74 



Carried forward 10,666 04 



204 08 




5,626 46 




1,259 37 




60 26 




102 47 




19 08 






18,080 42 



Brought forward 10,666 04 

Other Expenses: — 

Drugs and medicines .... 142 66 

Bedding, dry goods and 
clothing 

Groceries and provisions 

Equipment and supplies 

Telephone 

Electrical power 

All other 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Contagious Hospital 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitor and Labor 928 93 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel 930 97 

Light 409 05 

Janitors' supplies 23 03 

Furniture and furnislv 

ings 140 57 

Repairs to buildings .... 60 82 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment 154 49 

Plumbing and supplies 149 65 

Hardware and materials 52 54 

All other 21 35 

Special Items: — 

Refrigerators 550 00 

Ironing machine 146 30 

Insurance 120 80 



Inspection of Animals and Provisions 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspector 2,300 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Telephone 34 40 

Auto maintenance 200 00 



Inspection of Milk and Vinegar 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspector 2,750 00 

Milk Collector and Dairy 

Inspector 1,800 00 

Milk Collector 207 00 

Technician 331 42 

Carried forward 5,088 42 



CITY AUDITOR 55 

Expenses Outlays 



3,688 50 



2,534 40 



5G 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing a, n d 

postage 

Auto maintenance 

Equipment and supplies 

Diary Inspection 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Typewriter 

Inspection of School Children 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspectors 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies 

Carfares 

School Nurses' Salaries 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Nurses 

Sewers Construction 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Labor 

Printing 

Other Expenses: — 

Teaming 

Pipe and fittings 

Brick and cement 

Sand 

Castings 

Other Materials 

Contract Work 

Constructing catch 
basins 

Middlesex Ave., Storm 
Drain 

Sewers — Meacham and 
Edgar Sts 

Sewers — Jacques St. .. 

Shore drive 

Sewers — Puritan Road 

and Putnam Road 

Sewers — Fellsway West 
All other 



5,088 42 


Expenses 


190 24 




602 96 




292 29 




292 12 




3 85 




92 25 






6.562 13 



Outlays 



1,600 00 



15 00 
113 63 



2,600 00 



5,070 
121 


87 
00 


1015 
4,454 
2,093 
96 
2,066 
577 


84 
17 
63 
20 
44 
04 


1,258 


80 


66,799 


16 


1,857 

2,025 

384 


15 

70 
81 


598 
233 

485 


17 

28 
16 



V 



1,728 63 



2,600 00 



89,123 42 



Engineering Department, Sewers 
Maintenance 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspector 1,438 27 

Labor 10,965 30 

Other Expenses: — 

Teaming 10,111 79 

Tools and equipment .... 934 71 
Other materials and sup- 
plies 77 39 

Care of Medford Street 

Pump 642 63 

Telephone 77 07 

Repairs 122 67 

All other 88 96 

Special Items: — 

Changing catch basins.... 105 85 

Hose 417 48 



CITY AUDITOR »1 

Expenses Outlays 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Sewer Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Labor 73 83 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel 40 76 

Light 78 30 

Repairs to building 1 75 

Plumbing 17 79 

Lumber and materials.... 8 57 



Sanitary Department 

General Administration: — 

Superintendent 2,400 00 

Bookkeeper 300 00 

Printing and stationery 45 47 

Telephone 78 71 

Auto maintenance 872 98 

All other 70 

Ashes, Rubbish and Garbage: — 

Labor 74,126 41 

Hired teams and trucks 71,644 46 

Equipment and repairs.. 85 67 

Rent of dump 1,430 00 

Materials and supplies.... 204 86 

Contract work 34,800 00 



24.982 12 



221 00 



Carried forward 185,989 26 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 185,989 26 

Stable Expenses: — 

Shoeing 209 30 

Stable equipment 112 10 

Board of horses 1,357 00 

Horses 400 00 

All other 60 

Special Item: — 

Auto 1,175 00 

Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Sanitary Buildings 

Labor 5 52 

Fuel 82 81 

Light 219 96 

Lumber and materials 18 42 

Furniture and furnishings 1 80 

Repairing drain 190 00 

Highways, Street Cleaning 

Labor 19,046 07 

Hired teams and trucks.... 3,436 42 

Sweeper Maintenance 1,927 24 

Supplies 194 17 

Gasoline 448 85 

Highway Maintenance 

General Administration: — 

Superintendent 3,300 00 

Bookkeeper and Clerk .... 3,095 50 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies 158 82 

Telephone 233 83 

Maintenance Superin- 
tendent's Auto 74 10 

All other 18 10 

General: — 

Labor 59,194 52 

Tools, equipment and re- 
pairs 973 77 

Autos and supplies 6,470 61 

Broken stone, gravel, etc. 1,926 38 
Edgestone, bricks and ce- 
ment 1,194 13 

Lumber 306 43 

Tarco and road oil 3,412 72 

Fuel 442 48 

Oil and waste 649 91 

Steam rollers 183 36 

Carried forward 81,634 66 



Expenses 



Outlays 



189,243 26 



v 



518 51 



25,052 75 



CITY AUDITOR 



Brought forward 81,634 66 

Hardware, paint and 

varnish 1,660 13 

Other materials and 

supplies 540 14 

Hay, grain and straw 6,515 19 

Shoeing 202 51 

Veterinary and medicine 123 80 
Harnesses and horse 

clothing 503 84 

All other 11 51 

Horses 305 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Signs 372 80 

All other 27 00 

Special Items: — 

Taxes, City of Waltham 317 18 

Roadster 544 50 

Repairs to fence 172 45 

Mixer 283 71 

Fords 946 00 

Adding machine 118 75 

Part cost of Dane and 

Tyler Streets 214 23 

Insurance 65 69 

Snow plow 268 52 

Sprayer and paint ma- 
chine 205 00 

Typewriter 98 70 

95,131 31 
Less Service transfers for 
teaming, use of roller and 

horses 13,856 89 

Highway Construction, New Streets 

Labor 3,845 52 

Hired teams and trucks 459 97 

Use of roller 205 50 

•Contracts 27,348 58 

Tarvia 6,144 06 

Advertising, Recording, etc. 85 09 
Edgestones, crushed stone 

and circles 15,493 17 

Mixer 24 00 

Other materials 712 83 

Highway Construction, Permanent Pavement 

Labor 1,419 54 

Contracts 195,313 63 

Hired Teams and Trucks.. 263 31 

Carried forward 196,996 48 



Expenses 



.7.1 
Outlays 



81,274 42 



54,318 72 



60 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 196,996 48 

Use of Roller and Mixer.... 14 00 

Equipment 2,078 35 

Brick, stone and cement.... 164 05 

Other materials 293 73 

All other 8 73 

Special Item: — 

Removing tracks 1,023 30 



Highway, Reconstruction and Resurfacing 

Labor 7,124 92 

Hired teams and trucks.... 775 98 

Use of roller 993 75 

Tools and equipment 583 20 

Road Binders 7,637 62 

Brick, stone and cement.... 10,364 87 

Other materials 108 78 

Tarvia 907 44 

Special Item: — 
Contract, — 

Resurfacing Broadway 3,955 01 



Sidewalks Construction 



Expenses Outlays 



Labor 

Hired teams and trucks .. 
Stone, brick and cement.. 

Edgestone 

Mixer 

Other Materials 

Equipment 

All other 74 86 



Sidewalks Maintenance 

Labor 

Hired teams and trucks .... 

Use of mixer 

Stone, brick and cement.... 
Other materials and sup- 
plies 



Street Sprinkling 

Labor 

Hired teams and trucks .... 
Equipment and repairs .... 
Oil and other dust layers 

Carried forward 25,788 55 



9,459 


95 


1,096 


61 


3,042 


70 


371 


35 


250 


88 


1,494 


71 


320 


29 


74 


86 


7,091 


83 


1,023 


08 


13 


50 


1,703 


93 


465 


56 


5,513 


81 


2,705 


49 


21 


64 


17,547 


61 



200,578 64 



32,451 57 



16,471 35 



10,297 90 



25,788 


55 




350 


05 




5,850 


00 




, 4,910 


81 




425 


83 




76 


66 


37,401 90 






74,291 


70 




46 


97 




27 


08 




253 


60 




33 


19 




6 


44 


74,658 98 



Brought forward 

Maintenance water posts 

and hydrants 

Use of car sprinkler 

Gravel 

Hardware and materials .... 
All other 



Street Lighting 

Electricity 

Spot Lights 

Memorial tablets 
Relocating lights 

Traffic signal 

All other 



Public Bu-ildings Department, Maintenance 
Highway Buildings 

Labor 468 22 

Fuel 863 47 

Light 248 50 

Hardware and materials .... 77 80 

Lumber 341 62 

Plumbing supplies 124 62 

Furniture and furnishings 33 28 

Repairs to buildings 23 56 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 2 21 

All other 5 25 

Special Items: — 

Insurance 69 10 

Installing heating 535 00 



CITY AUDITOR 61 

Expenses Outlays 



Welfare Department, Miscellaneous 

General Administration: — 

Agent 2,400 00 

Clerks 2,492 00 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies 103 58 

Telephone 120 09 

Conference Expenses 224 79 

All other 5 25 

Outside Relief: — 

City Physician 2,300 00 

Acting City Physician 87 96 

Auto maintenance 200 00 

Board and care 1,205 01 



2,792 63 



Carried forward 9,138 68 



€2 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 9,138 68 

Cash 29,175 80 

Cash Allowance 687 41 

Groceries and provisions 1,402 16 
Medicine and medical at- 
tendance 235 77 

Nursing 6 50 

Dry Goods and clothing 68 46 

State Institutions 5,571 47 

Other Institutions 11 43 

Somerville Hospital 10,000 00 

Burials 270 00 

Relief by other Cities or Towns: — 

Cities 6,762 00 

Towns 1,040 67 

Mothers' Aid: — 

By City 38,896 00 

Other Cities or Towns.... 4,304 64 

Taxi and ambulance hire 68 00 



Expenses Outlays 



Welfare Department, City Home 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Warden and Matron 

Bookkeeper 

Domestic labor 

Farm labor 

Other Expenses: — 

Auto maintenance 

Groceries and provisions 

Clothing 

Medicine and hospital 
goods 

Household furnishings 
and supplies 

Farm equipment and 
supplies 

Hay, grain and feed 

Horse shoeing 

Harnesses and horse 
clothing 

Seeds and fertilizer 

Books, printing, station- 
ery, postage 

Telephone 

Power 

Ice 

Disinfectant and sprayer 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Boiler 

Cow 



2,400 


00 


150 


00 


3,015 


19 


3,178 


98 


91 


24 


4,588 


60 


419 


82 


58 


84 


196 


88 


465 


04 


1,070 


70 


37 


50 


10 


10 


148 


45 


47 


15 


74 


59 


45 


00 


112 


60 


40 


51 


63 


38 


798 


46 


125 


00 



107,638 99 



17,133 OS 



Public Buildings Department, City 
Home Buildings 

Labor 461 93 

Fuel 1,747 82 

Light 562 37 

Furniture and furnishings 75 21 

Repairs to buildings 240 06 

Plumbing and supplies 69 67 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 466 69 

Hardware and materials.... 192 56 



CITY AUDITOR 63 

Expenses Outlays 



Special Items: — 

Fence 

Insurance 87 44 



Fence 671 19 



4,574 94 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 
Soldiers' Benefits, General Administration 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Agent 300 00 

Clerk 1,095 50 

Other Expenses 24 31 

1,419 81 

Soldiers' Relief 

Cash as per pay rolls 28,514 00 

Medicine and Medical At- 
tendance 56 85 

Groceries 38 20 

28,609 05 

State Aid 

Cash as per pay rolls 5,520 00 

5,520 00 



Military Aid 

Cash as per pay rolls 4,695 00 

4,695 00 

Soldiers' Burials 

Burials 180 00 

180 00 



<»4 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



EDUCATION 

School Contingent 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Superintendent 5,012 10 

Asst. Superintendent .... 280 25 

Clerks 8,462 79 

Truant Officer 2,000 00 

Other employees 419 37 

General Expenses: — 

Stationery, postage and 

office supplies 1,109 74 

Telephones 1,411 48 

Automobile maintenance 341 64 

Travel 110 00 

All other 117 82 

Textbooks and Supplies: — 

Text and reference books 

and Music 14,325 49 

Maps 203 42 

Stationery and supplies.. . 13,660 56 
Equipment and repairs.. 1,242 44 
Manual Training Sup- 
plies 3,841 71 

Other Expenses: — 

Support of Truants 860 28 

Diplomas and graduation 637 36 

Printing and advertising 1,326 76 

Catering 124 00 

Power 767 48 

Binding 917 03 

Disbursements 981 22 

All other 25 00 

Special Items: — 

Typewriters 1,780 00 

Piano 369 00 

Hire of Bus 50 00 

School Department, Outside Tuition 

Tuition: — 

City of Boston 7,431 46 

Other Cities 1,616 22 

School Teachers' Salaries 

Day Schools 777,040 05 

Evening Schools 8,291 00 

Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
School Buildings, Janitors' Salaries 

Janitors' Salaries 68,785 23 



Expenses 



Outlays 



60,376 94 



9,047 68 



785,331 05 



68,785 23 



Maintenance School Buildings, Fuel and 
Light 

Fuel 31,860 40 

Light 11,260 02 

Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 

School Buildings, Buildings and Grounds 

Labor 12,146 36 

Furniture and furnishings 5,959 18 

Janitors' Supplies 1,134 59 

Laundry 47 06 

Repairs to buildings 5,545 26 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 3,559 21 

Equipment and repairs 465 80 

Plumbing 4,242 10 

Glass, Hardware and paint 6,283 54 

Lumber 900 40 

Other materials and sup- 
plies 3,183 32 

Care of grounds 1,994 24 

Flags and Flag poles 238 88 

Auto maintenance 218 21 

Power 403 59 

Teaming 1,078 38 

All other 205 69 

Special Items: — 

Furnishing and install- 
ing motor 610 00 

Painting Cutler School.... 577 10 

Painting Western J r . 

High School 507 00 

Buick 1,325 00 

Fence — Northern Eastern 

Jr. High School 1,078 80 

F e n c e — Southern J r . 

High School 429 00 

Fence— Durell School .... 307 00 

Retaining wall — Southern 

Jr. High School 2,310 00 

Steps — Hanscom School 1,555 56 

Roof— Hanscom School .. 400 00 

Insurance 1,712 25 

New School Building, East Somerville 

Heating contract 1,046 70 

Additional Land, Burns Schoolhouse 

Recording 4 47 

Taking of land and build- 
ings 1,013 50 



CITY AUDITOR 65 

Expenses Outlays 



43,120 42 



58,417 52 



1,046 70 



1,017 97 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



S. Newton Cutler Funds 
Books 



SCHOOL TRUST FUNDS 

Expenses 



Smith-Hughes Fund 
School Teachers' Salaries. 

Caroline G. Baker Fund 
Christmas celebrations 



659 09 



3,677 96 



13 50 



Outlays 



659 09 



3,677 96 



13 50 



LIBRARIES 
Central Library 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Librarian 3,300 00 

Assistants 20,540 78 

Other Expenses: — 

Books 5,235 31 

Periodicals 698 78 

Music 8 99 

Binding 1,454 18 

Postage and office sup- 
plies 1,420 25 

Printing and advertising 608 27 

Telephone 146 13 

Express 164 24 

All other 87 68 

'.Special Items: — 

Typewriter 89 50 

Convention Expenses .... 45 05 

i. 

Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Central Library 

Janitors 3,378 80 

Labor , 60 94 

Fuel 620 85 

Light 1,086 75 

Furniture and furnishings 271 34 

Janitors- supplies 92 05 

Repairs to buildings 156 90 

Hardware and materials .... 9 45 

All other 1 00 

Special Item: — 

Insurance 80 23 



33,799 16 



5,758 31 



1,723 


75 


315 


39 


421 


04 


194 


80 


43 


12 


40 


90 


207 


12 


6 


05 



West Somerville Branch Library 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants 6,522 41 

Other Expenses: — 

Books 

Periodicals 

Binding 

Postage and office sup- 
plies 

Printing and advertising 

Telephone 

Express 

All other 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
West Somerville Branch Library 

Janitor 1,434 99 

Labor 142 33 

Fuel 427 68 

Light 356 20 

Repairs to buildings and 

plumbing 45 94 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 15 45 

Care of Grounds 54 00 

Hardware and materials .... 12 88 

All other 10 38 

Special Items: — 

Repair Roof 171 50 

Fence 38 50 

Insurance 63 23 



East Somerville Branch Library 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants 4,812 36 

Other Expenses: — 

Books 1,129 14 

Periodicals 145 43 

Music 95 

Binding 286 92 

Postage and office sup- 
plies 136 63 

Printing and advertising 28 54 

Telephone 38 25 

Express 204 93 

Ice 16 20 



CITY AUDITOR 67 

Expenses Outlays 



9,474 53 



2,773 08 v 



6,799 35 



08 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
East Somerville Branch Library 

Janitor 1,222 00 

Labor 29 96 

Fuel 324 16 

Light 189 42 

Furniture and furnishings 2 70 
Repairs to building and 

plumbing 14 57 

All other 2 75 

Sepcial Item: — 

Insurance 63 23 



Union Square Branch Library 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants 4,709 65 

Other Expenses: — 

Books 1,433 12 

Periodicals 11 95 

Music 157 34 

Binding 206 55 

Postage and office sup- 
plies 190 57 

Printing and advertising 24 07 

Telephone 49 04 

Express 205 08 

Ice 12 45 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Union Square Branch Library 

Janitor . 1,213 17 

Labor 474 26 

Fuel 413 76 

Light 251 16 

Furniture and furnishings 16 40 

Janitors' supplies 1 50 

Care of Grounds 186 59 

Repairs to building and 

plumbing 114 94 

Hardware and materials .... 123 65 

All other 22 02 

Special Item: — 

Painting building 530 00 



Expenses Outlays 



1,848 79 



6,999 82 



3,347 45 



CITY AUDITOR 69 

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Expenses Outlays 

S. Newton Cutler Fund 

Books 27 75 

27 75 

Martha R. Hunt Art Fund 

Books and pictures 73 29 

73 29 

Martha R. Hunt Book Fund 

Books 465 76 

465 76 

Isaac Pitman Poetry Fund 

Books 27 71 

27 71 

Hunt Fund For Expenses 

Investments 299 77 

299 77 

Wilder Childrens Fund 

Books 15 46 

15 46 

Sarah Lorane Graves Fund 

Investment 400 00 

400 00 v 

Engineering Department, Parks 
Maintenance 

Labor 7,089 62 

Teaming 326 67 

Tools and equipment 335 47 

Materials and supplies 305 85 

Trees, shrubs and plants 1,879 60 

Repairs 269 40 

Flags and Flag poles 57 50 

Care of bubblers and foun- 
tains 364 39 

Care of grounds 110 28 

All other 8 50 

Special Items: — 

Contract work 1,986 14 

Fences 1,367 64 

Driveway and walk 757 58 

Field Artillery 60 00 

Gutters, Powder House 

Boulevard 161 60 

15,080 24 x 



70 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Park Buildings 

Labor 607 40 

Fuel 327 43 

Light 254 58 

Repairs to buildings 21 67 

Plumbing 99 97 

Hardware and materials .... 40 47 
Laundry and Janitors' sup- 
plies 229 41 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 45 00 

All other 6 00 

Special Item: — 

Erecting hot water tank 274 84 



Engineering Department, Playgrounds 
Maintenance 

Labor 4,450 82 

Teaming 719 50 

Tools and equipment 277 02 

Materials and supplies 606 46 

Use of roller 322 10 

Repairs to fountain, fences 

and backstops 231 84 

Repairing seats 63 30 

Caretaker, Tufts Oval 178 20 



Public Welfare and Recreation 
Commission 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Supervisor 

Instructors 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment and supplies 

Civic social centre 

Demonstrations 

Disbursements 

Telephone 

Music 

Printing 

All other 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Bathhouse 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Attendants and Labor .... 1,415 74 

Other Expenses: — 

Teams and trucks 5 25 



1,304 


17 


4,477 


46 


1,510 


70 


37 


50 


100 


00 


365 


92 


39 


40 


70 


00 


42 


50 


52 


25 



Expenses Outlays 



1,906 77 



6,849 24 



,999 90 



Carried forward 1,420 99 



CITY AUDITOR 



71 



265 00 



284 


05 


60 


63 


80 


64 


1,296 


00 


3,152 


10 


92 


85 


64 


90 


609 


34 


107 


15 


59 


50 



Brought forward 

Bathing suits 

Towels 

Repairs to buildings 

Equipment and supplies 

Sand 

Telephone 

Laundry 

Hardware and materials 
Plumbing 

Special Item: — 

Painting 

Celebrations 

Labor 

Trucking 

Printing and postage 

Music 

Decorating and Fireworks 

Refreshments 

Lumber 

Miscellaneous supplies 

April 19th Celebration 

All other 



Improvement of Playgrounds, Walter 
Ernest Shaw 

Labor 1,001 17 

Teams 98 02 

Equipment 33 00 

Playground, Ward Six 

Labor 315 76 

Teams 23 63 

Contract work 3,075 79 

Supplies 46 74 

Fence 1,704 47 

Field House — Dilboy Field 

Labor 1,311 22 

Blueprints 21 98 

Construction Contract 15.875 00 

Miscellaneous materials .... 190 09 

Installing water service 301 06 

All other 1 50 

Constructing sewer, etc 576 00 

Equipment 740 52 

Grading 678 60 

Teams 375 12 

Furniture 71 25 

Cinders 405 00 





Expenses 


1,420 99 




262 53 




136 12 




3 50 




46 41 




390 00 




38 08 




121 03 




53 75 




41 77 





Outlays 



2,779 18 



5,807 16 



/ 



1,132 IS- 



5,166 39 



20,547 34 



72 ANNUAL REPORTS 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Memorial Day 



Expenses Outlays 



Music and Catering 407 41 

Flowers and Flags 248 67 

All other 39 92 

Markers 56 92 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Bandstand 

Labor 109 63 

Teaming 174 54 

Hardware and materials .... 1 40 



Rifle Practice Cos. A. & B, First Engineers 

Use of Range 571 64 

Transportation 965 00 



Municipal Documents 

Printing 2,219 04 

Quarters for George Dilboy Post, V. F. W. 

Rent 600 00 



Quarters for American Legion 

Rent 600 00 



Quarters for Spanish War Veterans 
Rent 30 00 



Convention, American Legion, 
Middlesex County 

Printing 57 75 

Rent 15 00 

Music 52 25 

Catering 375 00 



Workmens' Compensation 

Compensation for Injuries 3,756 30 

Medical Attendance 220 75 

Books, postage, supplies.... 15 95 



752 92 



285 57 



1,536 64 



2,219 04 



600 00 



600 00 



30 00 



500 00 



3,993 00 



CITY AUDITOR 



Pensions 

Janitors 1,620 51 

Police 11,313 30 

Fire 6,549 34 

Weights and Measures 812 50 

Miscellaneous Welfare 850 00 

Laborers: — 

Highway 9,724 39 

Sanitary 7,685 61 

Water :.. 3,379 18 

Damage to Persons and Personal 
Property 

Settlement of Claims 9,530 80 



Expenses 



73 

Outlays 



41,934 83 



9,530 80 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Interest 

Temporary Loans: — 

Anticipation of Revenue 39,824 Z5 V 
General Loans: — 

Sewer 5,506 25 

Highway 6,180 00 

City 4,850 00 

Bridge 857 50 

Metropolitan Park 175 00 

Public Buildings 7,075 00 

Schoolhouse 31,360 00 

City Hall Additions 5,855 00 

101,683 10 

Reduction of Funded Debt 

General Loans: — 

Sewer 20,000 00 

Highway 35,000 00 

City 23,000 00 

Bridge 1,000 00 

Metropolitan Park 1,000 00 

Public Buildings 18,000 00 

Schoolhouse 45,000 00 

City Hall Additions 8,000 00 

151,000 00 



WATER WORKS 
Water Maintenance 

Administration : — 

Commissioner 3,300 00 

Clerks 9,771 91 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies ?. 1,984 05 

Carried forward 15,055 96 



15,055 


96 


335 


06 


38 


73 


43,808 


39 


2,717 


23 


5,730 


04 


116 


27 


2,189 


71 


6,413 


82 


262 


33 


9 


25 


194 


37 


657 


86 


44 


36 


273 


70 


20 


21 


64 


86 



74 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Telephone 

All other 

General: — 

Labor 

Pipe and fittings 

Meters and fittings 

Hydrants and fittings .... 

Tools 

Autos, trucks and sup- 
plies 

Horses and equipment .... 

Power 

Miscellaneous supplies.... 

Street repairs 

Fountains 

Contract Labor 

Maps 

All other 

Special Item: — 

Convention Expenses .... 121 50 



Less Service Transfers for 
Teams and Street Sprink- 
ler Hydrants 

Water Works Extension 

Labor 

Hired teams and trucks 

Pipe and fittings 

Hydrants and fittings 

Meters and fittings 

Tools and equipment 

Contract work 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Water Buildings 

Labor 514 79 

Fuel 315 80 

Light 433 92 

Lumber and Materials 393 83 

Repairs to buildings 13 27 

All other 6 75 

Special Items: — 

Hot Water Heater 87 32 

Insurance 63 23 



Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Assessment 138,498 07 



Expenses Outlays- 



78,053 


65 


721 


36 


6,603 


95 


305 


00 


35,380 


16 


2,671 


91 


2,297 


33 


42 


50 


6,107 


S4 



77,332 29 



53,408 69 



1,828 91 



138,498 07 



CITT AUDITOR 



O 



OTHER ACCOUNTS 

Temporary Loans 

Expenses 
Loans in anticipation of 

Revenue 2,000,000 00 

2,000,000 00 " 

Tax Titles 

Taxes 1924 162 08 

162 08 

State Taxes 

State 189,480 00 

189,480 00 v 

Metropolitan and Other Assessments 

Metropolitan Park 72,073 09 

Metropolitan Sewer 109,022 32 

Wellington Bridge 2,154 16 

Charles River Basin 9,887 75 

Alewife Brook 997 43 

Prevention of Fire 1,140 94 

State Highway 791 50 

Soldiers' Exemption 300 35 

Division Metropolitan 

Planning 1,085 91 

Abatement of Smoke 417 21 

197,870 66 

County of Middlesex 

County Tax 1925 144,324 14 

144,324 14 

Cash Refunds 

Taxes 363 40 

Water 165 91 

Other 102 11 

631 42 ; 

Tellers Overs and Shorts 

Short 76 16 

76 16 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Liquor License Fees 5 25 



Outlays 



5 26 



76 ANNUAL REPORTS 

PRIVATE TRUST 

Expenses Otitlays 

Redemption of Tax Titles 

Tax Titles Redeemed 4,655 12 

4,655 12 v 

Totals $5,640,255 54 $440,817 65 

Refunds 2,005 51 351 20 ' 

$5,642,261 05 $441,168 85 
Total Cash Pay- 
ments $6,083,429 90 ' 

* Expenditures as shown in all accounts are net 



CITr AUDITOR 



77 



SCHEDULE OF PUBLIC PROPERTY 

Land and 

School Buildings Buildings Personal Totals 

Prescott 72,200 00 3,000 00 75,200 00 

East Somerville Junior High 62,000 00 2,000 00 64,000 00 

Hanscom 66,500 00 4,000 00 70,500 00 

Davis 53,500 00 17,500 00 71,000 00 

Clark Bennett 54,500 00 3,500 00 58,000 00 

Knapp 53,000 00 5,500 00 58,500 00 

Baxter 39,200 00 1,500 00 40,700 00 

Perry 52,000 00 1,500 00 53,500 00 

Bell and Southern Jr. High 236,000 00 10,000 00 246,000 00 

Pope 83,600 00 5,000 00 88,600 00 

Cummings 18,400 00 1,500 00 19,900 00 

Edgerly 43,000 00 5,000 00 48,000 00 

Northern Eastern Jr. High 618,000 00 20,000 00 638,000 00 

♦High 396,000 00 30,000 00 426,000 00 

Glines 96,400 00 5,000 00 101,400 00 

Forster 64,000 00 4,500 00 

Forster (Annex) 40,000 00 3,500 00 112,000 00 

tProctor 42,000 00 5,000 00 47,000 00 

Bingham 77,000 00 5,000 00 82,000 00 

Morse 59,000 00 5,000 00 64,000 00 

Carr 58,600 00 4,500 00 63,100 00 

Durell 22,600 00 1,500 00 24,100 00 

Burns 45,000 00 3,000 00 48,000 00 

Brown 80,000 00 3,000 00 83,000 00 

Highland 71,600 00 5,000 00 76,600 00 

Lowe 57,000 00 2,000 00 59,000 00 

Hodgkins 116,700 00 5,000 00 121,700 00 

x West Somerville Jr. High 200,000 00 8,000 00 208,000 00 

Lincoln 21,800 00 1,000 00 22,800 00 

Cutler 135,800 00 10,000 00 145,800 00 

Total $3,035,400 00 $181,000 00 $3,216,400 00 



* Land included in Central Hill Park 

t Building and fixtures. Land owned by State 

x Land included in Walter Ernest Shaw Playground 



<> s ANNUAL REPORTS 

Land and 

Buildings Personal Totals 
Fire Buildings 

New Fire Alarm Building $27,500 00 *$105,000 00 $180,200 00 

Central 47,700 00 

Engine Two 42,000 00 27,000 00 69,000 00 

Engine Six 39,900 00 25,000 00 64,900 00 

Hose Five 23,500 00 8,000 00 31,500 00 

Ladder One 61,400 00 25,000 00 86,400 00 

Ladder Two 19,700 00 15,000 00 34,700 00 

Engine Four 21,000 00 7,000 00 28,000 00 



Total $282,700 00 $212,000 00 $494,700 00' 

* Includes Electrical Department equipment 

Libraries 

♦Central 137,500 00 100,000 00 237,500 00 

East Somerville Branch 24,400 00 24,400 00 

West Somerville Branch 41,000 00 6,500 00 47,500 00 

Prospect Hill 20,000 00 2,000 00 22,000 00 



Total $222,900 00 $108,500 00 $331,400 00 

Miscellaneous Buildings 

Highway (stables, etc) 55,000 00 30,000 00 85,000 00 

Sewer 9,000 00 500 00 9,500 00 

Contagious and Tuberculosis 

Hospital 63,500 00 9,000 00 72,500 00 

City Home 106,200 00 17,000 00 123,200 00 

Police 70,500 00 8,000 00 78,500 00 

*City Hall 347,000 00 200,000 00 547,000 00 

*City Hall Annex 68,200 00 12,500 00 80,700 00 

* Land included in Central Hill Park 

Parks 

Trum 3,500 00 3,500 00 

Broadway 3,100 00 3,100 00 

Lincoln 3,000 00 3,000 00 

Bathhouse 5,000 00 5,000 00 

Polling Booths 300 00 300 00 

Sanitary 21,000 00 19,200 00 40,200 00 

Water 49,000 00 6,500 00 55,500 00 



Total $804,300 00 $302,700 00 $1,107,000 00 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Saxton C. Foss Park $421,200 00 $421,200 00 

Central Hill 472,000 00 472,000 00 

Lincoln 84,500 00 3,500 00 88,000 00 

Prospect Hill 69,800 00 1,500 00 71,300 00 

Tufts 109,000 00 109,000 00 

Paul Revere 1.000 00 1,000 00 

Belmont Street 5,100 00 5,100 00 



CITY AUDITOR 



79 



Land and 
Building-s 

Trum Playground 70,900 00 

Glen Street 17,300 00 

Kent Street 12,000 00 

Poplar Street 5,800 00 

Beacon Street 3,000 00 

Dilboy Field 64,000 00 

Ward Six 36,000 00 

Walter Ernest Shaw Playgr'd 54,500 00 

Total $1,426,100 00 

Miscellaneous Land 

Somerville Avenue 300 00 

Putnam 400 00 

Murdock Street 600 00 

Lowell Street 100 00 

Spencer Avenue 100 00 

Weston Avenue 2,100 00 

Endicott Avenue 700 00 

Waltham Gravel Land 10,000 00 

Cameron Avenue 1,000 00 

Alpine Street 1,200 00 

Princeton Street 1,600 00 

Cutler Street 400 00 

Wilson Avenue 600 00 

Total $19,100 00 

SUMMARY 

School Buildings $3,035,400 00 

Fire Buildings 282,700 00 

Libraries 222,900 00 

Miscellaneous Buildings 804,300 00 

Parks and Playgrounds 1,426,100 00 

Miscellaneous Land 19,100 00 

Total $5,790,500 00 

Sewer (cost) 

Water Works (cost) 

Total value public prop- 
erty 



Personal 



Totals 

70,900 
17,300 
12,000 
5,800 
3,000 
64,000 
36.000 
54,500 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



$5,000 00 $1,431,100 00 



300 


00 


400 


00 


600 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


2,100 


00 


700 


00 


10,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,200 


00 


1,600 


00 


400 


00 


600 


00 


$19,100 00 



$181,000 00 $3,216,400 00 



212,000 


00 494,700 00 


108,500 


00 331,400 00 


302,700 


00 1,107,000 00 


5,000 


00 1,431,100 00 




19.100 00 




$809,200 


00 $6,599,700 00 




1,477,741 00 




1,241,524 71 



$9,318,965 71 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF 

TAXES 



Somerville, Mass. 

January 30, 1926 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 

the City of Somerville : 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present the annual report of the City Treas- 
urer and Collector of Taxes for the year 1925. The outstand- 
ing feature of the report is the statement showing uncollected 
taxes, the balance uncollected prior to the 1925 commitment 
being $334.44 for the year 1924. The amount allowed for 
Overlay & Abatement in the commitments of 1922, 1923 and 
1924, was f 87,475.00, being approximately 1% of the total 
warrant for these years. Of this amount there was saved for 
and credited to Keserve, Surplus from Overlays the sum of 
$27,364.05 because of the prompt collection of the taxes. This 
saving was equal to 31% of the total allowed for Overlay & 
Abatement account for the years referred to. The taxes of 
1925 show satisfactory collections. The total poll commit- 
ments were $61,872.00, outstanding December 31, $2,696.00, 
or approximately 4J^ % ; personal tax commitments $267,297.- 
96, outstanding December 31, $27,392.35, or approximately 
10% ; real estate commitments $2,649,876.06, outstanding De- 
cember 31, $412,574.48, or approximately 16%, which would 
seem to be a fairly good record. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph S. Pike, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Tames. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 81 

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSE 

Excess and Deficiency Credit Bal. Jan. 1, 1925 $57,876 83 

By adjustment credits 179 60 



58,056 4a 
To adjustment charges 227 13 



Assessed in Taxes, 1925 $2,905,222 16 

Excise Taxes 18 77 



57,829 30 



2,905,240 93 

Estimated Revenue (net) 598,633 43 

Surplus War Bonus Fund 46,598 06 

Corporation Taxes 102,568 42 

Income Taxes 232,847 29 

National Bank Tax 2,449 82 

337,865 53 



Boston Elevated Deficit 869 75 

So. Midd. Health Assn 391 86 

Dividend Bankruptcy 2 00 

1,263 61 

Supplementary Warrants prior years 487 59 

Sale Land (appropriated to Outlays) 1,500 00 



General Expenses $2,710,869 62 

Interest 101,683 10 

Reduction Funded Debt 151,000 00 

Met. Water Asst 138,498 07 



$3,949,418 45 



3,102,050 79 



State Tax 189,480 00 

State Assessments 197,870 66 

County Tax 144,324 14 

531,674 80 

Tellers Shorts & Overs 76 16 

3,633,801 75 

Appropriated to Outlays for Permanent 

Improvements 215,358 06 

Balance to the credit of Excess and Defi- 
ciency account, December 31, 1925 100,258 64 



$3,949,418 45 



BORROWING CAPACITY, DECEMBER 31, 1925 

Valuation, 1923 $92,519,400 00 

Supplementary 9,000 00 

$92,528,400 00 

Valuation, 1924 99,311,000 00 

Supplementary 6.500 00 

99,317,500 00 

Carried forward $191,845,900 00- 



82 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Brought forward $191,845,900 00 

Valuation, 1925 104,769,800 00 

Supplementary 12,600 00 

104,782,400 00 



Total $296,628,300 00 

Abatements 1923 $481,487 00 

1924 549,625 00 

1925 406,300 00 



1,437,412 00 



$295,190,888 00 

Average three years, one-third 98,396,962 66 

Two and one-half per cent 2,459,924 06 

Funded debt Dec. 31, 1925 1,613,000 00 

Met. Park Asst. Loan 1902, Chap. 325 

(outside limit) 4,000 00 



1,609,000 00 

Borrowing capacity Dec. 31, 1925 $850,924 06 

Maturities : 

January 1, 1926 29,000 00 

April 1, 1926 64,000 00 

July 1, 1926 $42,000 00 

Less outside limit 1,000 00 

41,000 00 



October 1, 1926 21,000 00 155,000 00 



$1,005,924 06 

Maturities within limit 1926 155,000 00 

Maturities outside limit 1926 1,000 00 



$156,000 00 



Per cent of Funded Debt Dec. 31, 1925 to average valua- 
tion three years as above .01 64. 

Population April 1, 1025, 99,206 (official). Estimated 
Dec. 31, 1925 100,000. Per capita debt $16.13. 



CONDENSED CASH STATEMENT 

Receipts Payments 

Revenue $5,855,364 79 $5,656,408 90 

Non-Revenue 190,361 54 427,021 00 



$6,045,726 33 $6,083,429 90 

Cash Balance Cash Balance 

Jan. 1, 1925 336,210 76 Dec. 31, 1925 298,507 19 



$6,381,937 09 $6,381,937 09 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 83 



DETAILED CASH STATEMENT 

RECEIPTS 

Balance from 1924 $336,210 76 

Taxes 1922 $5 00 

1923 387 48 

1924 420,221 80 

1925 2,485,652 11 



Excise 1924 18 26 

1925 7 76 

Street Sprinkling 1924 7,096 68 

1925 38,685 92 

Highway Assessments 1924.... 8,869 00 

1925.... 11,345 50 

Apportioned 62 35 

Committed Interest 18 12 

Sidewalk Assessments 1924.... 2,022 11 

1925.... 2,168 14 

Committed 82 05 

Committed Interest 4 35 

Sewer Assessments 1924 1,655 00 

1925 3,136 68 

Metered Water Charges 1924.. 32,297 14 

Water Sales 254,061 33 

Maintenance 7,341 80 

Services 12,417 97 



Treasury Department: 

Cost: Taxes 4,986 17 

Assessments 17 00 

Tax Lien Certificates 996 00 

Redemption Certificates 22 00 

Departmental Accounts 87,822 99 

Departmental Deposits 13,454 83 



Interest: 

Taxes 14,593 82 

Assessments 234 63 

Bank, Treasurer 10,381 91 

City Clerk 8 39 



$2,906,266 39 

26 02 

45,782 60 

20,294 97 

4,276 65 
4,791 68 

306,118 24 



6,021 17 
101,277 82 



25,218 75 



Carried forward $3,420,074 29 $336,210 76 



84 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Brought forward $3,420,074 29 $336,210 76 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Corporation Taxes $102,568 42 

Bank Taxes 2,449 82 

Street Railway Taxes 13,324 31 



Income Taxes: 

1922 810 50 

1923 4,052 50 

1924 6,484 00 

1925 221,500 29 



118,342 55 



232,847 29 



For Schools: 

Continuation 5,845 23 

Vocational 11,990 42 

Americanization 3,494 71 

21,330 36 

Boxing Licenses 284 62 

Soldiers' Benefits 8,333 25 

Lieu Taxes 83 05 

Elevated Deficit 869 75 

County of Middlesex: 

Dog Licenses 2,383 54 

Courts, Police 17,217 18 

County 1,755 75 

18,972 93 

Departmental Penalties: 

Schools 298 00 

Licenses & Permits 18,600 00 

Miscellaneous Revenue: 

Edison Electric Illumi- 
nation Company, elec- 
trolysis 500 00 

Costs of Suit 8 00 

So. Midd. Health Assn 391 86 

Bankrupt Dividend 2 00 

901 86 

Excess & Deficiency 179 60 

Sale of Land: 

Beacon St 2,800 00 

Elm St 340 00 

3,140 00 

Soldiers' Benefits Advance .... 100 00 

Grade Crossings 429 57 

Revenue Loans 2,000,000 00 

Accrued Interest 1,438 89 



Carried forward $5,848,609 55 $336,210 76 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 85 

Brought forward $5,848,609 55 $336,210 76 

General Expense (Refunds). .. 1,905 51 

Trust Funds, Income: 

School: Cutler $214 50 

Smith-Hughes 3,316 14 

Baker 14 25 

3,544 89 



Library: Cutler 42 88 

Hunt Art 59 72 

Hunt Books 495 30 

Pitman Art 171 32 

Pitman Poetry .... 42 82 

Wilder 4 75 

Graves 13 00 

829 79 

Welfare: Cummings 75 05 

Sarah L. Graves Fund, 

principal 400 00 



Non-Revenue 

Bonds Sold 185,000 00 

Offset to Outlays 701 42 

Redemption Tax Titles 4,655 12 

Comm. of Mass. Liquor Li- 
cense Fees 5 00 



5,855,364 79 



190,361 54 



6,045,726 33 

$6,381,937 09 
PAYMENTS 
Revenue 
Advance Soldiers' Benefits.. $100 00 

Refunds : 

Taxes 1924 $93 84 

1925 269 56 



Street Sprinkling, 1925 

Water prior years 

current year 

Tax Titles 

Revenue Loans 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State Tax 

Assessments 

Soldiers' Exemptions 

County of Middlesex, County 
tax 

General Expenses 

Interest Funded Debt 

Revenue Loans 

Reduction Funded Debt 

Metropolitan Water Assess- 
ment 



Carried forward 







363 40 






39 QQ 






6 60 






159 31 






162 08 






2,000,000 00 


$189,480 


00 




197,570 


31 




300 


35 


387,350 66 
144,324 14 






2,726,922 


98 




61,858 


75 




39,824 


35 




151,000 


00 




138,498 


07 


3,118,104 15 








$5,650,610 00 



86 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Trust Funds Investment: 

Hunt Art 

Graves 


659 

3,677 

13 


09 
96 
50 


299 77 
400 00 


$5,650,610 00 




699 77 


Trust Funds Income: 

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Smith-Hughes 


4,350 55 
609 97 


Baker 








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27 
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465 
27 
15 


75 
29 
76 
71 
46 




Pitman Poetry 

Wilder 














4,960 52 
76 16 
62 45 


Tellers Shorts & Overs 

Excess & Deficiency 


$422,360 63 
4,655 12 

5 25 


Non-Revenue 

Outlay Appropriations 


$5,656,408 90 


Redemption Tax Titles 

Com. of Mass. Liquor License 
Fees 






427,021 00 




3,582 94 
294,924 25 


Cash in office 


$6,083,429 90 


Deposits in banks 


298,507 19 








$6,381,937 09 



BALANCES, DECEMBER 31, 1925 

Debit 

Cash $298,507 19 

Cash Advances 200 00 

Taxes, 1924 334 44 

1925 435,350 59 

Excise, 1925 11 01 

435,696 04 

Street Sprinkling, 1925 7,312 24 

Overlay & Abatement, 1924.... 

1925.... 
Supplementary Assessments.... 
Highway Assessments, 1925.... 12,636 50 

Highway Apportioned 239 SO 

Sidewalk Assessments, 1925.... 4,065 75 

Sewer Assessments, 1925 2,978 16 

19,920 21 

Metered Water Charges, 1925 33,299 79 

Soldiers' Benefits 8,047 50 

Tax Titles 1,564 88 

Carried forward $804,547 85 



Credit 



$334 44 

14,883 74 

627 24 



$15,845 42 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 87 

Brought forward $804,547 85 $15,845 42 

Temporary Loans 600,000 00 

Funded Debt 1,613,000 00 

Net Funded Debt 1,613,000 00 

Accrued Interest ' 1,438 89 

Outlay Appropriations 39,968 19 

Trust Funds: 

School: Cutler 54 

Baker 7 50 

8 04 

Library: Cutler 20 34 

Hunt Art 51 74 

Hunt Books 34 90 

Pitman Art 381 42 

Pitman Poetry 67 00 

Wilder 2 58 

Graves 13 00 

570 98 

Welfare: 

Cummings 582 32 

Sundry Persons . 291 65 

Excess & Deficiency 100,258 64 

Reserve Fund (Surplus from 

Overlay) 23,285 85 

Special Assessments Reserved 19,920 21 

Sale of Land I 2,377 68 

Public Trust Funds: 

School: Cutler 5,000 00 

Baker 300 00 

5,300 00> 

Library: Cutler $1,000 00 

Hunt Books 12,000 00 

Hunt Art 1,299 77 

Pitman Art 80% 

Pitman Poetry 20% 5,314 58 

Wilder 100 00 

Graves 400 00 

20,114 35 

Welfare: 

Cummings 1,681 66 

Investment 27,096 01 



!,444,643 86 2,444,643 86 



The assessor's warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon 
polls and property April 1, 1925, amounted to $2,978,485.65. 

Real Estate: 

Land $26,624,850 00 

Buildings 68,402,150 00 

95,027,000 00 
Personal 9,742,800 00 

Total Valuation $104,769,800 00 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



At a rate of $27.40 

Polls, 30,795 at $2.00 
Street Sprinkling 



Committed Highway Assess- 
ment 

Committed Sidwalk Assess- 
ment 

Committed Highway Interest 

Committed Sidewalk Interest 



Additional Assessments: 
Personal $12,600 at $27.40 

Polls, 141 at $2.00 

Excise 



Total commitment by Asses- 
sors 





$2,870,692 52 
61,590 00 
46,036 26 


$62 35 

82 05 

18 12 

4 35 


$2,978,318 78 
166 87 




$345 24 

282 00 
18 77 


$2,978,485 65 
646 01 






$2,979,131 66 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



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STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS 

1924 1-925" 

Balance Dec. 31, 1924 $7,107 00 , 

Committed $'46;036 26 

Refunds 39 66 



Total charges $7,107 00 $46,075 92 

Collected , 7,096 68 38,685 92 1 

Abated 10 32 77 76 



Total credits $7,107 00 $38,763 68 

Balance Dec. 31, 1925 $7,312. 2£ 



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94 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REVENUE LOANS 



In anticipation of Revenue 



Balance from 1924 

Borrowed by authority of an order of the 
Board of Aldermen on city notes, as 
follows : 

Nos. 

1241-1248 274 days @ 2.94 disct $100,000 00 

1249-1254 259 " 3.04 " *($4.00).. 300,000 00 

1255-1262 226 " 3.29 " 150,000 09 

1263-1270 219 " 3.35 " 150,000 00 

1271-1282 189 " 3.46 " 200,000 00 

1283-1289 169 " 3.33 " 250,000 00 

1291-1298 199 " 3.33 " *($1.25) .. 250,000 00 

1299-1300 198 " 3.21 " *($7.00) .. 100,000 00 

1301-1302 226 " 3.21 " 100,000 00 

1303-1307 

& 1314 194 " 4.03 " *($7.00) .. 150,000 00 

1308-1313 229 " 4.03 " 150,000 00 

1315-1318 185 " 3.63 " *($2.30).. 100,000 00 

Paid notes maturing in 1925 

Maturing in 1926 

♦Premium 

Amount paid for discount on amount 

borrowed in 1925 $39,824 35 

Notes average 213 days and the average 

rate 3.365 + 

Average for 1924, 216 150/195 days and 

average rate 4.07+ 



$600,000 00 



2,000,000 00 

$2,600,000 00 

2,000,000 00 

$600,000 00 



The funded debt December 31, 1925, was $1,G13,000.00 
classified as follows: 



Met. Park Asst. Loan at 3Mj per cent 
Lowell Street Bridge at Sy 2 per cent 

Sewer at ZV 2 per cent 

Sewer at 4 per cent 

Sewer at 4 1 / 4 per cent 

City at 3 x /2 per cent 

City at 4 per cent 

Highway at 3y 2 per cent 

Highway at 4 per cent 

Highway at 4y 2 per cent 

Highway at 5 per cent 

City Hall Addition at 4 per cent 

City Hall Addition at 4^4 per cent 

Public Building at 4 per cent 

Public Building at 4V 2 per cent 

Schoolhouse at 4 per cent 



$4,000 


00 


24,000 


00 


32,000 


00 


137,000 


00 


18,000 


00 


4,000 


00 


103,000 


00 


6,000 


00 


168,000 


00 


16,000 


00 


55,000 


00 


64,000 


00 


70,000 


00 


107,000 


00 


50,000 


00 


755,000 


00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 95 

Funded debt within the limit fixed by law 

Lowell Street Bridge $24,000 00 

Sewer 187,000 00 

City 107,000 00 

Highway 245,000 00 

City Hall Addition 134,000 00 

Public Building 157,000 00 

Schoolhouse 755,000 00 

$1,609,000 00 



Beyond limit fixed by law 
Met. Park Asst. (Chap. 325, Acts 1902) .... $4,000 00 



4,000 00 



$1,613,000 00 



96 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



97 



BONDS DUE IN 1926 



January 

Met. Park .... 

Lowell Street 

Bridge 

Sewer $1,000 00 



City 

Highway .... 
City Hall 

Addition .. 
Public Bldg. 
Schoolhouse 



2,000 00 
6,000 00 



5,000 00 
15,000 00 



April 



$1,000 00 

9,000 00 

10,000 00 

22,000 00 



July 



5,000 00 
17,000 00 



October 



'C-'-l uvv v " 




11,000 00 




7,000 00 




15,000 00 






$8,000 00 


8,000 00 






13,000 00 







Total 

$1,000 00 

1,000 00 

21,000 00 

19,000 00 

43,000 00 

8,000 00 

18,000 00 

45,000 00 



$29,000 00 $64,000 00 $42,000 00 $21,000 00 $156,000 00 



BOND INTEREST DUE IN 1926 



Met Park .... 


January 
$70 00 


April 


July 
$70 00 


October 


Total 
$140 00 


Lowell Street 
Bridge 


$420 00 

2,142 50 

870 00 

2,555 00 

2,767 50 

860 00 

9,700 00 


$402 50 

1,966 25 

672 50 

2,055 00 

2,767 50 

760 00 

9,360 00 


822 50 


Sewer 

City 


1,540 00 
1,260 00 
2,645 00 


1,520 00 
1,220 00 
2,540 00 


7,168 75 
4,022 50 


Highway .... 
City Hall 
Addition .. 


9,795 00 
5,535 00 


Public Bldg. 
Schoolhouse 


2,405 00 
5,400 00 


2,305 00 
5,100 00 


6,330 00 
29,560 00 




$13,320 00 


$19,315 00 


$12,755 00 


$17,983 75 


$63,373 75 



BONDS OUTSTANDING DECEMBER 31, 1925 



With 



Met. Park 

Lowell Street Bridge 

Sewer 

City 

Highway 

City Hall Addition ... 

Public Bldg 

Schoolhouse 



Interest to Maturity 




Bonds 


Interest 


Total 


$4,000 00 


$350 00 


$4,350 00 


24,000 00 


10,080 00 


34,080 00 


187,000 00 


42,845 00 


229,845 00 


107,000 00 


14,080 00 


121,080 00 


245,000 00 


41,390 00 


286,390 00 


134,000 00 


51,682 50 


185,682 50 


157,000 00 


33,775 00 


190,775 00 


755,000 00 


264,320 00 


1,019,320 00. 


$1,613,000 00 


$458,522 50 


$2,071,522 50; 



98 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



YEARLY BOND MATURITIES WITH INTEREST 

Date Due Pricipal Interest Total 

1926 $156,000 00 $63,373 75 $219,373 75 

1927 146,000 00 57,156 25 203,156 25 

1928 137,000 00 51,343 75 188,343 75 

1929 135,000 00 45,771 25 180,771 25 

1930 128,000 00 40,386 25 168,366 25 

1931 '.. 118,000 00 35,348 75 153,348 7*5 

1932 108,000 00 30,781 25 138,781 25 

1933 92,000 00 26,613 75 118,613 75 

1934 91,000 00 22,926 25 113,926 25 

1935 84,000 00 19,361 25 . 103,361 25 

1936 61,000 00 16,073 75 77,073 75 

1937 61,000 00 13,603 75 74,603 75 

1938 55,000 00 11,173 75 66,173 75 

1939 54,000 00 8,983 75 62,983 75 

1940 53,000 00 6,831 25 59,831 25 

1941 52,000 00 4,716 25 56,716 25 

1942 52,000 00 2,621 25 54,621 25 

1943 24,000 00 846 25 24,846 25 

1944 1,000 00 192 50 1,192 50 

1945.. 1,000 00 157 50 1,157 50 

1946 1,000 00 122 50 1,122 50 

1947 1,000 00 87 50 1,087 50 

1948 1,000 00 52 50 1,052 50 

1949 1,000 00 17 50 1,017 50 



$1,613,000 00 



$458,522 50 



$2,071,522 50 



MEMORANDUM OF PAYMENTS IN 1925 ON ACCOUNT OF DEBT 



Bonds, General City Debt 

Revenue Loans 

On account of 

Metropolitan District Debt: 

Sewers 

Parks 

Wellington Bridge 

Charles River Basin 

Alewife Brook 

Water 

Somerville's proportion 
for debt requirements: 

In State Tax 

In County Tax 



Principal 
$151,000 00 



30,399 23 
3,962 42 



305 69 

818 39 

14,180 47 



16,896 14 
15,402 00 



Interest 
$61,858 75 
39,824 35 



23,378 

13,641 

25 

3,381 

179 

80,534 



91 
15 
30 
73 
04 
66 



22,106 00 

5,889 00 



Total 
$212,858 75 
39,824 35 



53,778 

17,603 

25 

3,687 

997 

94,715 



14 
57 
30 
42 
43 
13 



39,002 14 
21,291 00 



$232,964 34 $250,818 89 $483,783 23 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 99 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 1925 

Appropriated in budget $25,300 00 

Salaries and Wages: 

Treasurer and Collector $4,000 00 

Deputy Collector 2,200 00 

Cashiers 2,781 45 

Clerks, including tracer 10,799 30 

Other Expenses: 

Books, postage and supplies 3,074 86 

Printing and advertising 930 58 

Telephone 153 87 

Bonds 310 00 

Carfares and car hire 25 20 

All other 110 96 

Special Items: 

Typewriters and repairs 283 00 

Check endorser 190 00 

Receipting machine 163 00 

Convention expenses 78 31 



$25,100 53 
Balance unexpended 199 47 



$25,300 00 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



PUBLIC WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

1925 



CHARLES S. CLARK 

MRS. SOPHIE C. BATEMAN 



Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 



MEMBERS 



MRS. SOPHIE C. BATEMAN 
GEORGE H. EVANS 
ERNEST W. BAILEY 
WILLIAM E. COPITHORNE 
DR. WINNIFRED P. DAVIS 
CHARLES S. CLARK 
WILLIAM STUART HOWE 
MRS. FLORENCE B. HAMILTON 
MISS MARY M. McGANN 
MRS. ELBRIDGE NEWTON 



Term 

Expires 

January 

1927 

1927 

1927 

1927 

1927 

1926 

1926 

1926 

1926 

1926 



FRANCIS J. MAHONEY 



Secretary to the 
Commission 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 101 

CITY OF SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 



February 19, 1926 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : 

The Public Welfare and Recreation Commission submits 
this report of its work for the municipal year 1925 with recom- 
mendations for the development of the interests committed to 
its care. The municipal appropriation for the work of this 
Commission during" the past year was $8,000. x\n itemized 
statement of the expenditure of this money is given in a 
table in another part of this report. The Commission 
has carried on during this last year the general undertak- 
ings which have been established in previous years and which 
have heretofore been reported upon by the Commission and by 
the Director of Recreation, employed by the Commission. All 
of these branches of work have been carefully managed and 
developed as far as public interest and the resources at the 
command of the Commission have warranted. As the Com- 
mission has no control over outdoor areas or over buildings or 
parts of buildings, its work has been mainly in providing serv- 
ice. During the winter it has carried on recreational activ- 
ities in certain schoolhouses ; during the summer it conducted 
supervised playgrounds on certain parks and school grounds, 
and during the open season it has also provided supervisors of 
play for certain localities and on certain days of the week. A 
full account of these activities for the year 1925 will be found 
in the report of the Director of Recreation, presented herewith. 
In its concern for the development of recreational opportu- 
nities in the City of Somerville, the Commission notes with 
pleasure the advances made by the City during the year 1925 
in the erection of a commodious Field House for Dilboy and 
Somerville Fields and the purchase of additional land for the 
Burns School playground. It recognizes also the interest in 
playgrounds shown by the Planning Board and approves of the 
recommendations made by that body for increasing the play 
areas under control of the city. It gives approval to the pro- 
posal of City Engineer Ernest W. Bailey to devote the north- 
easterly end of Saxton C. Foss Park to playground purposes, 
affording for the eastern part of the city opportunities equiv- 
alent to those now provided by Dilboy and Somerville Fields. 
In connection with these actual and proposed additions to the 
playgrounds of the city, the Commission calls attention to the 
fact that practically the only play areas now open to the use of 



102 ANNUAL REPORTS 

children are those owned or controlled by the city. Vacant 
lots have almost entirely disappeared. Backyards no longer 
furnish room for the play of children, such spaces now either 
being occupied by dwellings or by garages. The streets are 
unsafe and the sidewalks are too narrow for children's play. 
Hence, the only chance they have for play is upon the public 
areas. Therefore, it is important that these areas shall be nu- 
merous enough to provide room for all the children and shall 
be in such a condition as to furnish a fit place for children to 
play all the year round. Neither of these conditions is true at 
the present time. There are not enough play areas and those 
that we have are not properly and adequately conditioned. 
Such being the case, the Commission conceives it to be its duty 
to call the public attention to this situation and to offer a rea- 
sonable plan for escape from it. With this purpose in view 
the Commission presents the following program of improve- 
ments to be undertaken progressively during the next five 
years. This program is expressed in two parts. The first 
contains a minimum statement of things which ought to be ac- 
complished within that time; the second contains a list of 
things which it is desirable to have provided within five } T ears 
but which, owing to their greater cost, the Commission does 
not urge as a part of its five-3 T ear minimum provision. 

The Commission recommends that an appropriation be 
made this year for a part of this work and that in succeeding 
years appropriations be made to carry on the improvements 
continuously until the whole undertaking is accomplished. 
The Commission is convinced that it is necessary for the City 
to do this work before its recreational areas can yield their full 
value. Never before has there been such urgent need of places 
of safety and refuge for children from the dangers of the street 
as exist today. Moreover, the urgency of this need will grow 
with the increase of building and with the increase of traffic 
congestions in the streets of the city. The Commission believes 
that the adoption of the following program of improvements 
would, in five years, go a long distance in the direction 
of providing adequate outdoor recreation for the whole 
community. 

t 

Program I The Commission urges that the following 

improvements be made progressively during the next five years. 

1. Kesurfacing parks and playground areas and certain 
schoolyards. 

2. Fully equipping all playground areas with apparatus 
varying according to the size and nature of the play- 
ground. Specifically it is urged that suitable out- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 103* 

door permanent equipment be installed on Lincoln 
Park, Trum Field, Cherry Street Grounds, and Dil- 
boy Field. 

3. Enlarging the wading pool at Lincoln Park, repair- 
ing the wading pool at Trum Field, and providing, 
wading pools in other localities. 

4. Constructing running tracks at Somerville Field and 
Lincoln Park. 

5. Converting the northeasterly end of Foss Park into 
a playground in accordance with plans of the City 
Engineer approved by the Somerville Planning 
Board. 

6. Providing a new Public Bath House on the Mystic 
River to take the place of the one now located at the 
Wellington Bridge. This Bath House and Beach 
is no longer suitable for public use because of a new 
storm drain which has recently been constructed on 
account of the Ford plant located nearby. This 
drain crosses the bathing beach to empty into the 
Mystic and greatly reduces the amount of free space 
available for beach purposes. 

Program II 

1. Erecting recreation houses to contain storage rooms, 
showers, toilet, etc. at Cherry Street Playground and 
Foss Park. 

2. Acquiring additional play areas for neighborhood 
playgrounds. 

CONCLUSION: 

There are many evidences of a new and increasing inter- 
est among the people of Somerville in improving the recrea- 
tional opportunities of the city. This condition encourages the 
Commission to believe that the adoption by the City Govern- 
ment of this plan of progressive improvement would have the 
approval of citizens generally. In this hope and belief the 
Commission makes this report and asks for it the thoughful 
consideration of those in authority as well as of all persons 
to whose benefit and enjoyment these improvements would 
greatly contribute. 

Respectfully submitted, for the Commission, 

Charles S. Clark, 

Chairman. 



104 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF RECREATION 



To the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission: — 

In addition to the customary annual statement covering 
the year's activities, undertakings, and accomplishments under 
your Commission, the Director has been required by vote of the 
Commission at its December 1925 meeting, to present, as sup- 
plementary to such report, a further statement, 

(a) analysing the present status of the Commission's 
general undertakings ; 

(b) setting forth the Director's judgment regarding 
provisions which are necessary or highly desirable for the 
future success of Recreation and Welfare in the City; 

(c) offering suggestions and information that may as- 
sist the commission in denning its policies and elaborating 
.and reorganizing its service. 

Accordingly this communication, in form and in content, 
varies somewhat from previous reports by the Director, and 
from the more common form of routine statement that is con- 
noted by the term "Annual Report". Whereas customarily 
the emphasis is placed upon presentation of statistics, records, 
comparison with previous records, and specific details of the 
ivork in hand , the emphasis in this Report is transferred to the 
other divisions of the Report, mentioned above as additional, 
and distributed among them. For more complete and more 
specific information concerning the details of the work carried 
on during the year, reference is made to the Annual Report of 
the Director of Recreation for 1921, contained in the Annual 
Report of the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission for 
1921. The details given in this previous report explain the 
system, the methods, the conditions of carrying on the work, 
etc. The extension of this system and these methods, the im- 
provement or mastery of these conditions, and the initiating 
of entirely new enterprises for Public Recreation, have been 
the business of the year 1925, just closed. 

The customary record of the year's activities under my 
supervision is submitted first; and the other business of the 
.report comes later in this communication. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 105 



STATEMENT OF 1925 ACTIVITIES 

It seems wise, in presenting this report, to give separate 
consideration to the various branches of the Recreation work. 
They include 



I. The Summer Playgrounds 

II. The Spring-and-Fall Supervised Athletics 

III. The Saturday Playgrounds for Small Chil- 

dren 

IV. Evening Adult Recreation Centers 

V. The Neighborhood Center 

VI. The Preserving and Canning Activities of 

School Children 

VII. The Recreational Activities Involving the 

General Public 

VIII. The Experiment in Community Recreational 

Drama 

IX. Public Celebrations. 



Summer Playgrounds 

The essential character and general mode of the Summer 
Playgrounds Season are the same as those of the 1924 season, 
reported a year ago by the Director. 



Features 

But some new features of the season of 1925 are conspic- 
uous to the observation of the Director, and are judged worthy 
of special mention under this caption. More detailed reference 
to them, each under its proper heading, will follow. 

New units of supervised play, added to the Summer Play- 
grounds system this year to serve the interests of children in 
sections of the City hitherto served most meagerly or not at all, 
have, in the Director's estimation, been so successfully operat- 
ed as to constitute one of the most beneficial accomplishments 
that can be cited under consideration of Summer Playgrounds 
for some time. 

Enlargement of the supervisory corps, consequent on the 
expansion of the system, has increased and complicated the 
Director's task of unifying and vitalizing the work, standard- 



10(5 annual retorts 

izing objectives, co-ordinating the various units, superintend- 
ing details, supplying materials where and when needed, assist- 
ing in training the workers to highest efficiency, and evaluat- 
ing the relative efficiency of the workers. 

A marked public interest in playground work, noted and 
reported last year, has continued to express itself this year, 
even to more marked degree and in greater variety of ways, 
especially among citizens in those sections of Somerville where 
new playground units have been supervised this past Summer 
for the first time. 

The zealous corps of play-supervisors and assistants 
whose previous accomplishments have brought forth many fa- 
vorable comments of public officials, private citizens and the 
public press, has undergone some important changes in per- 
sonnel for 1925, without any lowering of efficiency, in the Di- 
rector's opinion. While regretting the withdrawal from the 
ranks of several well-qualified, trained, loyal workers, whose 
contributions to the system make the community their debtor, 
the Director reports an asset in the addition to the corps of an 
even larger number of equally valuable workers. 

Grounds 

Fourteen areas were used for playground purposes during 
the past Summer. Seventeen units were conducted, however, 
some of these areas having separate units for boys and girls. 
The various units are named as follows, and the names suggest 
the areas utilized : 

Bennett School Ground (for girls) 

Central Hill Park (for girls and boys) 

George Dilboy Field (for boys) 

Fellsway East (for boys) 

Saxton C. Foss Park (for girls) 

Glen St. Playground (for girls and boys) 

Hodgkins School Grounds (for girls) 

Joy St. Playground (for boys) 

Kent Street Boys' Playground 

Kent Street Girls' Playground 

Lincoln Park (for boys) 

Morse School Grounds (for girls and boys) 

Perry School Grounds (for girls) 

Richard Trum Boys' Playground 

Richard Trum Girls' Playground 

Tufts College Old Campus (for girls) 

Western Playground (for boys) 

(At Western Junior High School Grounds) 

Two of these units were new this year to the Playgrounds 
system: — those at Glen Street Playground and at Tufts Col- 
lege Old Campus. We have already stated that they have been 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 107 

operated with complete success, in the Director's opinion, and 
that, in service to the play needs of Somerville children, their 
operation seems to be a very considerable development in Play- 
grounds system. 

The Playground at Tufts Old Campus had been originat- 
ed in 1924, and financed in greater part not by the City, 
through this Department, but through the private initiative 
and enterprise of citizens in the upper Clarendon Hill sec- 
tion, led by the Mothers' Circle. These ladies had enlisted the 
interest of parents and children and sought assistance and 
encouragement from the Public Welfare and Recreation De- 
partment. This year the activities of this playground were 
more completely incorporated into the City-wide system main- 
tained under the Commission. New permanent play equip- 
ment, including swing frames, swings, sand boxes, etc., 
was installed at expense from the Commission's funds, and 
the Commission and the Mothers' Circle shared the expense 
of Supervision. The local supervisor was paid by the Circle 
for 5 weeks. The Commission financed the remainder of the 
payment of this position, — and provided the services of the 
Director and the special supervisors in dancing and hand- 
work ; while workers under the Commission attended to pub- 
licity for the enterprise and co-ordination with other play- 
ground units. The City supplied also the portable play ma- 
terials. In this enterprise a third cooperating agency was 
the Trustees of Tufts College, who in public spiritedness 
granted the use of an attractive, ample and suitable section of 
its grounds. 

The Glen Street Playground unit was entirely new. It 
is located on the vacant land (a large part of which is City 
property) at the junction of Glen and Oliver Streets, — a piece 
of land which the Director urges upon the Commission as ex- 
tremely desirable for complete ownership by the City and for 
very thorough-going conversion into a playground. Its oper- 
ation during the past Summer was a booi/to hundreds of chil- 
dren who reside in an area hitherto totally unserved. The imme- 
diate district, within four minutes of this land, has a child 
population of several hundred, and the districts outlying are 
also unequipped with playgrounds. Several main thorough- 
fares for motor vehicles — Franklin Street, Cross Street, Wash- 
ington Street, Meclford Street, Glen Street and newly paved 
Pearl Street — pass within one or two minutes' walk of this 
playground, constituting a menace to so many hundred chil- 
dren who might be freed from danger by means of a properly 
equipped, active and attractive playground. Regardless of 
more detailed plans the Director urges complete fencing of 
this area by a 12 ft. wire screen fence ; provision of drinking- 



108 ANNUAL REPORTS 

water facilities and seats ; resurfacing ; replacement of base- 
ball back stop ; provision of shelter or shade trees or both. 

In the Director's fourteen years of experience with City 
supervision of play no such response on the part of children 
and their families has been shown, when supervised play op- 
portunities have been provided, as was shown during the past 
Summer when this unit was first operated. Scores of expres- 
sions have come to the Director from residents of the neigh- 
borhood, to the effect that this operation has supplied a much 
felt need of long standing and that even in the opening weeks 
very tangible evidence of good had resulted. The spontaneous 
response of the children was inspiring to all connected with 
the enterprise. (The Director feels an urge to express at this 
point admiring appreciation for the enthusiastic leadership 
supplied by the two persons assigned to supervision at the 
Glen Street Playground : Miss Mary Eaton and Mr. William 
Koen.) Further comments on the grounds, their conditions, 
etc., are made in the supplementary statement later in this 
report. 

Supervision 

Twenty-six persons including the Director were employed 
in the supervision of the Summer play. Of this number, four 
were assigned to individual playgrounds ; two acted as special 
supervisors of folk dancing; and one as supervisor of hand- 
work. 

All but three of the supervisors are residents of Somer- 
ville. This statement is made to indicate that despite the 
Civil Service requirements as to qualifications, it is possible 
to secure from our own residents efficient supervision. The 
Director feels that this policy should be continued in Somer- 
ville unless its continuance should in any way hand- 
icap the effects of the playground organization. All of the 
three non-residents were specialists, specially trained, 
for whose positions no trained Somerville applicant could be 
found in spite of thorough investigation. 

New problems in organizing the supervisory corps, grad- 
ually presenting themselves previously, have now become 
major problems of the whole undertaking, as a result of the 
increased number of playgrounds and the increased number 
of children under supervision. 

During 1924 and 1925 the number of summer units has 
increased from eleven to seventeen, and the number of child- 
ren under supervision has increased about 40 per cent. Di- 
rect superintendence, by the Director, of individual supervi- 
sors' work among their own groups of children is more dif- 
ficult. Administrative problems are larger and more com- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 109 

plicated. Special supervision for special activities can no long- 
er be delegated to part-time specialists, but requires full-time 
special supervision. Any progress, and in fact maintenance 
of present efficiency, urgently demands 

(a) Employment of Assistants to the Director, who 
shall not be attached to any given playground in 
particular. 

(b) Increased provision for interplayground visitation 
and transportation of supplies. 

(c) Increased provision for expense of coordinating 
supervision through central headquarters. 

(d) Employment of additional persons to assist in 
supervision on larger units, — Lincoln Park, Foss- 
Fellsway, Glen Street. 

Attendance 

Attendance has been high and regular at all the play- 
grounds, with a significant uniformity throughout each week 
and throughout the season on any given playground. The 
City-wide aggregate attendance this season, partly because 
of the increased number of play units, was greater than that 
of the 1924 season by about ten per cent; and the same is true 
of the average daily attendance. Most noticeable in increased 
attendance among the older playgrounds were the Fellsway 
and Morse grounds. 

Activities 

The activities conducted on the playgrounds may be 
grouped under six heads and distinguished as Games, Hand- 
work, Dancing, Safety Campaign, Miscellaneous Activities, 
and Special Events including the Final Play Festival and Dis- 
play of Handwork. For the sake of brevity, the activities are 
not discussed in detail. The Report of the Director for 1924 
gives a detailed explanation of them. 

CLOSING PLAY FESTIVAL. The closing festival held on 
the Wednesday evening of the final week of the season, at twi- 
light, was calculated to serve a four fold purpose, namely: 

1. The purpose suggested by its name. 

2. To demonstrate organized play to the public, and 
exhibit its results, with a view to securing wider 
public interest. 



110 \XXUAL REPORTS 

3. To encourage the children in their play activities, 
and to provide free public recreation for adults. 

4. To give the children an opportunity to repay the 
community in part for the benefits they had received 
from the supervised playgrounds. 

The Festival attracted several thousands of the public 
in addition to the three thousand five hundred boys and girls 
who participated in the twenty events on the program. It 
was conducted on Central Hill Park, in the area in front of 
the High School Buildings and the City Hall Annex. The pro- 
gram of events included competitive games for boys and girls, 
folk dancing accompanied by music furnished by a brass 
band , relay races, marches, drills, a doll carriage parade, and 
a procession of the participating children. 

This festival furnished a fitting close to the playground 
season. 

Finances 

The total expenditure from the City Treasury for the 
Summer Playgrounds program under your Commission was 
$3,550.00. Of this amount the expense of the supervision was 
$2,229.00, not including salary paid to the Director during 
the summer, which is elsewhere included as a part of the all- 
year item of Director's Salary; for supplies, maintenance and 
labor, $1,321.00. 

The Somerville Playgrounds Association has been of 
great financial assistance (for some years past), in providing 
equipment, particularly on those areas not under control of 
the City Engineer's Department. 

Further financial assistance came, of course, from the 
fact that the cost of supervision on the Tufts Old Campus 
Playground was met by the Mothers' Circle. 

As a result of these facts, and of the additional fact 
that new equipment and repairing of old equipment must be 
provided to cope with the results of wear and deterioration 
through several years, it seems wise to point out here that in 
anticipating the year 1926 from the financial standpoint a 
fairly substantial increase in expenditure for equipment, and 
for City supervision of the Tufts unit, must be considered. 
And at this point, too, the Director, regarding finances, calls 
attention to the possibility of still additional cost involved 
in the proposed increase of number of playgrounds to be oper- 
ated in the Summer and at other seasons. This increase is pro- 
posed in the series of Recommendations later in this report. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 111 

Recommendations — Summer Playgrounds 

Based on thoughtful study and thirteen years of intimate 
experience with the playground situation in Somerville, the 
following recommendations for the future are submitted at 
this point, as belonging most especially to the Summer sea- 
son's interest ; they will be included again in a series of rec- 
ommendations later in this report, covering the general Rec- 
reation work of the entire year. Other recommendations 
prompted by experience in the Summer Playgrounds season 
of 1924, are purposely omitted at this point and reserved, on 
the ground that they have application beyond the Summer sea- 
son, for inclusion in the General Recommendations near the 
close of this General Report. 

1. The early completion of the Playground at the West- 
ern Junior High School. 

2. Improvement (and possibly extension) of the play- 
ground at Joy Street. 

3. Providing a playground surface and equipment on 
the vacant land (a large part of which is City prop- 
erty) at the junction of Oliver and Glen Streets, 
the equipment to include fencing, replacement of 
baseball back-stop, swing-frames, seats, shelter 
house and shade trees. 

4. Early completion of Saxton C. Foss Park, with a 
view to utilizing the lower end of it for athletic 
purposes, or the alternative suggested later in this 
report under the caption, "Playgrounds." 

•5. Resurfacing the playground at the Morse School; 
and completing the enclosure of the area by adding 
erection of a screen fence, on the westerly side, like 
that on the southerly side. 

6. Installing of more permanent framework for swings 
and teeters at the Morse Playground. 

7. The planting of shade trees on some of the play- 
grounds to provide a natural shelter for the future. 

8. Provision for a male supervisor at Central Hill 
Playground to serve the athletic interests of the boys 
at that center and to give part time supervision to 
older boys' activities at the Morse School Playground 
in Summer. (No male supervisor has ever been as- 
signed to either playground.) 



112 ANNUAL REPORTS 

9. Operation in Summer of additional units on the 
grounds of the Union Square branch of the Public 
Library; at the Cherry Street grounds recently pur- 
chased for play uses ; and on the grounds of the 
Northeastern Junior High School. 

10. Increasing the length of the period of supervision 
by at least one week. 

11. Provision of musical accompaniment for folk danc- 
ing. 

12. Provision for increase in the supervision corps to 
meet the needs mentioned earlier in this report under 
the caption, "Supervision." 



Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

Conduct of supervised play on Saturdays is calculated 
specifically to encourage active play of children under eleven 
years of age. Still further expansion of the supervised play 
plan, a program of after-school supervised athletics, aims to 
serve the older boys and girls, — those of the Junior High 
School and High School age. 

For details of the work in this branch, reference is made 
to the 1924 report. 

For outlining the methods, the activities, and the results 
in both these fields, it is well to emphasize the distinctive 
characteristics of each of these activities as they are to be 
differentiated from each other and from the Summer activi- 
ties. 

Specific Objectives 
In the Saturday Playgrounds supervision: 

(1) The "Neighborhood Playgrounds" idea is empha- 
sized, as expressed in the selection of smaller and 
less pretentious play areas, close to the homes of 
the children of districts somewhat limited in area, 
rather than the larger play centers, such as the 
public parks, which are intended to serve larger 
districts. 

(2) Special emphasis is given to the attempt to inter- 
est and provide activity for smaller children — 
those below eleven years of age. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION U<> 

In the After-School supervised athletics : 

(1) More active and less varied organized games, 
adapted to play by older boys and girls are en- 
couraged. 

(2) The larger areas, intended to serve larger districts,, 
are operated ; and fewer units have therefore been 
organized. 

Saturday Playgrounds 

Gradually, eight units of organized play have 
GROUNDS: been under supervision. They are listed in the 
Director's 1924 report. 

It should be noted that no Saturday playground is west 
of the summit of Spring Hill; and that all units are located 
within approximately only one-third of the City's area ; and 
that all but those at the Morse School are located within one- 
quarter of Somerville. This limitation has been necessary be- 
cause funds were not available for any expansion. The Di- 
rector is decidedly of the conviction that the number of Sat- 
urday playgrounds to be supervised in 1926 should be at 
least twice as great as the number supervised in 1925. There 
is a present demand on the part of children and adults in sev- 
eral sections for added units. 

Repetition is here made of the analysis offered in the 
1924 Report, regarding the value of this branch of the work 
and the Director's judgment regarding desirable future 
policy : — 

1. The Saturday Playground is entitled to a position of 
great importance in developing a Municipal Recreation pro- 
gram. 

2. The "Neighborhood Playground" plan enlists the 
activity of quite as many children — though in a larger num- 
ber of units — as does the Summer Playgrounds plan of organ- 
ization, within the sections of the City thus far provided for. 

3. The "Neighborhood Playground" plan has the impor- 
tant merit that it reaches very many children who otherwise 
might not acquire the habit of utilizing the City's playground 
facilities. 

4. The '^Neighborhood Playground" plan enlists the 
more intimate interest of a great number of parents. 

5. The ''Neighborhood Playground" plan must result 
in a greater attendance on the large playgrounds later, inas- 
much as it "educates" children in their early years to the 
Municipal Playground idea. 



114 ANNUAL REPORTS 

6. The Saturday Playground plan contributes largely 
to a "carrying over" from summer to summer of the desirable 
results obtained in following the objectives of the Playground 
work. 



Afternoon Supervision 

The after-school supervision of athletic activities for 
boys and girls of High and Junior High School age, two after- 
noons a week during the 18 weeks of Spring and Fall seasons, 
was conducted on the same basis as during the preceding 
year. No funds being available for expansion of, or further 
experiment in, the idea, there are only a few matters to be 
reported as new. These are mentioned immediately below and 
reference is here made, for complete statement on this branch 
of this work, to the Director's 1924 report. 

Attendance at the boys' units has increased about 40 
per cent beyond that of 1924, without increased cost, indicat- 
ing growth in appreciation and utilization of their opportuni- 
ties among the boys of the city ; also the need and demand 
for this branch of your Commission's service ; the increasing 
Talue to the Community to be realized from this undertaking 
as time goes on without proportionate increase in cost; and 
the worthiness of the expenditure that would be involved in 
extending the service to sections of the City not now reached. 

Attendance and activity at the Girls' Centers, reported 
at the close of 1924 to be far less satisfactory than that of the 
boys' centers, was not much increased during 1925, in spite 
of persistent effort and study by your Director and the re- 
sponsible supervisors; and the experiment in this phase of 
the work was discontinued by action of the Commission, at 
the Director's recommendation, at the close of October, 1925. 
This discontinuance was made partly because of the need for 
transference of funds to other branches of the Commission's 
work where more immediate results were possible. 

In explanation of the apparent temporary failure of the 
experiment here, it should be recalled 

1. That this experiment had been launched considerably 
later than that among the boys, and had therefore not had 
time to develop to the same degree ; 

2. That between September 15, 1924 and October 25, 
1925, not more than $220 was expended on the supervision for 
the girls, while some actual physical and recreational value 
came during this time to a small number of girls who took ad- 
vantage. All of them, according to the Commission's view, 
were fully entitled to these advantages. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 115 

3. That the inherent difficulty of enlisting the interest 
of present-day post-adolescent girls in this kind of activity is 
very great, especially when all of the centers of possible ac- 
tivity are so public and unsecluded. 



Finances — ■Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

Expenditure in the field of Saturday and after-school 
supervised play amounted to $1,505.01 ; of which $1,339.50 was 
expended for supervision and $165.51 for supplies, etc. 



Recommendations — Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

The following recommendations regarding future con- 
duct of the Saturday and Afternoon Supervised Play are re- 
spectfully submitted. They are repeated later in this report 
among the General Recommendations concerning the Recrea- 
tion work as a whole : — 

1. Increasing the number of Saturday "Neighborhood" 
Playground units from 8 to at least 16, making this branch 
of the work City-wide in scope, beginning immediately with 
the Kent Street Grounds. 

2. Increasing the number of units of boys' supervised 
after-school athletics from two to four. 

3. Increasing the number of sessions per week at after- 
school j)l ay grounds, — from two to three afternoons. 

4. Provision of the necessary field equipment for Ten- 
nis, Field Hockey, Soccer, etc., for use at these after-school 
sessions. 

Girls* Canning and Preserving Activities 

A most efficiently administered and supervised branch 
of the undertaking of the Public Welfare and Recreation Com- 
mission is the activity among girls who during spare time in 
Spring, Summer and Fall preserve fruits, vegetables, etc. 
Though this branch is perhaps less spectacular and is less 
known publicly, a high degree of efficiency in preserving has 
been attained among many girls of Somerville, whose ages 
range from 10 to 15 years; and a highly enjoyable and profit 
able form of recreation has been provided them. 

This work has been carried on in 1925 more extensively 
than ever before. Girls were enrolled earlier and in larger 



11 (> 4NNUAL REPORTS 

number ; and a larger numerical proportion of them completed 
the season's exercises and requirements. 

The organization of the work requirements made upon 
participating girls, schedule of sessions, centers, etc., and the 
details of the work are carefully presented in the Director's 
Report for 1924 to which reference is again made. (See pp. 
28-30. Annual Report of the Commission for 1924.) 

INCREASED ENROLLMENT. One hundred thirty-live girls 
were enrolled in the Clubs. 

The products of their activity included approximately 
8,000 jars, glasses, etc. These contained fruits, vegetables, 
jellies, jam, soups, fish, and pickle products. 

EXHIBITION. On September 25, 1925, a central exhibition 
was held at the High School. About 800 jars were attrac- 
tively displayed. First, second and third prizes were given 
for the best work in each year of enrollment. Honorable men- 
tion was given to ten others. Over 75% of the parents of 
children enrolled in the clubs were present at the exhibition 
showing more decidedly than ever the widespread in- 
terest which is growing from year to year in this home-making 
work. 

FINANCES. The total cost of carrying on this work was 
$568.81, of which $420. was expended on salaries of supervi- 
sors ; $48.81 on supplies and prizes ; and $100 for dues paid 
to the Middlesex County Bureau of Agriculture and Domestic 
Science Division of Junior Extension Work, for securing the 
County cooperation denned and described in the 1924 Report, 
page 29. 

Public Evening Recreation Centers 

The Public Evening Recreation Centers aim at profitable 
recreation — indoors — for adults. The scope of the work thus 
far has been limited to young men. No elaborate or inten- 
sive program has been carried out, because of a variety of rea- 
sons, which are here indicated. But in general summary 
the Director submits as his estimate that results have been 
proportionate to the City's financial expenditure (about 
$430.00 for the year) ; proportionate to the possibilities of an 
undertaking in which appropriate indoor recreation facilities 
are almost totally lacking and the workers in supervision all 
part time or occasional workers; and proportionate to the 
time during which this branch of the work has had opportun- 
ity for evolution. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 117 

CENTERS. The three centers are located in the buildings of 
the Bennett, Bingham and Morse Schools. In each building 
a room (a double room at the Bennett Center), used during 
the day by children of the lower primary grades, is at the dis- 
posal of the young men in attendance, with sessions from 7 :30 
to 9 :30, two evenings each week. The evenings vary with the 
various centers. A piano is available at each. 

ATTENDANCE. The average attendance for all centers has 
been thirty young men an evening, with a maximum attend- 
ance of 175 at the Bingham ; 85 at the Bennett, and 65 at the 
Morse. The average age of those in attendance has been 19 
years. The minimum age for participation is 17 years. Very 
few above the age of twenty-one have been attracted, though 
it has not been the intention to restrict the activity for the 
benefit of youths. 

ACTIVITIES. Since the whole enterprise has not passed 
the experimental nature, the program of activities is still in 
process of evolution. Naturally, a diversity is found among 
the local communities to which the centers cater; and accord- 
ingly there is a diversity in the nature of the activities. 

Among the activities carried on may be mentioned : 

1. Group singing and the organization of Glee Clubs. 

2. Some reading. 

3. Table games, puzzles and pastimes. 

4. Half-hour "talks" by prominent athletes. 

5. Indoor athletics (in the Bingham School only.) 

6. Discussion of current topics of interest, as radio. 

7. Informal, unpretentious, improvised entertainments. 

8. Whist and checker tournaments. 

9. An orchestra. 

10. Initial steps in developing adivities in drama. 

11. Debating. 

12. A movement to arouse interest and organization 
leading to out-of-door activities, after the indoor sea- 
son, among the same young men, and their friends, 
who frequent the indoor centers. This movement 
crystalized itself in organization of a baseball league 
for Somerville young men, which operated success- 
fully in the Summer. The members and followers 
of each team held occasional meetings in the build- 
ings where the centers are located in the hours of 



118 ANNUAL REPORTS 

the center sessions. Some of the teams have con- 
ducted recreational enterprises, such as whist 
parties, to finance the outfitting of the baseball 
teams, and in this way they have provided recrea- 
tion for parents and friends in their respective com- 
munities ; and have also enlisted the interest of per- 
sons in those communities in the Recreation Centers 
and in the general program of the Public Welfare 
and Recreation Department. 

SUPERVISION. In the conduct of this undertaking three 
persons besides the Director have been employed for supervi- 
sion ; one being the Supervisor of one center, one a leader in the 
musical activities in all three centers, and one a general assist- 
ant employed according to need in one center or another. 

An analysis of the values of recreation centers to Somer- 
ville, the provisions that are necessary for any further develop- 
ment and the difficulties of the work at present, is given 
in the Director's 1924 report. Definite Recommendations, on 
this study and analysis are submitted at the close of this 
present report. 



Neighborhood Center 

For the Welfare and Recreation work at the Anne Mc- 
Carthy Neighborhood Center, located in the Bennett School 
building, report of operations for 1925 would be very much 
the same as for 1924. All of the work outlined in the pre- 
vious report (pages 35-37) has been carried forward and the 
organization and methods have continued the same until the 
usual closing in Ma}\ 

With the resumption of the Fall Season, however, an im- 
portant change was made necessary in the Commission's policy 
with regard to this Center. The entire financial responsibility 
for this center, or, as alternative, minimizing its operations, 
was made necessary by the withdrawal from the enterprise 
of the representatives of the Committee on Ways and Means 
of the Somerville Federated Women's Clubs, who had for sev- 
eral years shared in the administration and financing of this 
center to such degree that the control of the Center was large- 
ly in the hands of these ladies. 

Since the Commission was without funds for assuming 
the entire burden, and since any continuance of operation 
opened up the problem of developing a new organization under 
City administration, the Commission adopted a policy of de- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 119 

liberation as to its future program; and thus the usual fall 
reopening of the center's activities has been postponed in 
1925, and only in December was any decision reached. In ac- 
cordance with this decision, an experimental reopening is to 
be made in the beginning of January 1926, with greatly re- 
duced activities. 



Community Drama in Recreation 

The work under the Commission in Recreational Drama,, 
in which experimental beginnings were made late in 1924, has 
been carried somewhat further in 1925, still without any ex- 
pense to the City. 

The general theory in this experiment has been 

(1) that a city of Somerville's size has a goodly num- 
ber of young men and women who are interested 
in dramatic expression and its kindred arts of 
aesthetic dancing, pageantry, choral activities,, 
scenic lighting, stagecraft, public speaking, etc. ; 

(2) that such interest can be stimulated into organ- 
ized activity encouraged by the Municipal Depart- 
ment controlled by your Commission ; 

(3) that cultural and recreational value to the com- 
munity at large would result from any consider- 
able activity by groups thus organized, to be af- 
fected by amateur theatricals and pageants, or- 
ganization of district dramatic clubs, etc. ; 

(4) that the Public Recreation Centers, Church and 
Parish Associations and Clubs, the High School 
Players' Club, etc., constitute a ready medium of 
organizing activities ; 

(5) that public observances of such holidays as Christ- 
mas, Independence Day, etc., can furnish another 
medium. 

In addition to the beginnings reported a year ago, the 
outstanding feature has been the organization of about 75 
persons from various sections of Somerville and of widely 
varying ages, into "The Somerville Little Theatre," which 
has held monthly meetings and some special meetings, at 
which several one-act plays have been staged ; and which fur- 



1-0 ANNUAL REPORTS 

nished the cast, coaching, lighting, etc. for a very creditable 
performance of a modern comedy in High School Hall during 
May for financial benefit to the Somerville Amateur Baseball 
League, organized under the auspices of your Commission and 
discussed later in this Keport. 



General Public Activities 

Under head of General Public Activities, the promotion 
of an amateur baseball league for young men is reported as 
the outstanding feature of the year. Eight teams were mem- 
bers, each with a large following of young men; and there 
was conducted successfully a ten-week schedule of games in 
which each team played twice a week in the league. 

Hundreds of Somerville people besides the participants 
were furnished recreation by the activities of the league, in- 
cluding the preliminary preparations during February, March 
and April. In this preseason period were held various 
meetings for organization, Committee meetings, etc., which 
have had, the Director believes, great social-civic value to 
Somerville as a community. The great social and recrea- 
tional values of organized public recreation were brought to 
the attention of hundreds of residents. Groups from distant 
sections of the Cit}^ met in common enterprise. Exchange of 
ideas and reflection on the recreation possibilities available 
and needed in Somerville were some of the products of this 
business. So strongly have the possibilities been demonstrat- 
ed that the Director is fully convinced that with workers and 
facilities provided, and with very small expense, there could 
be rapidly developed in Somerville a far-reaching organiza- 
tion of young men who would be actively interested in an all- 
year-round program of indoor and outdoor sports, with great 
profit to themselves physically, socially, and morally, and with 
immeasurable benefit to the Community at large. 

Such development is, of course, impossible with the pres- 
ent limited organization of workers, and with the extreme 
limitations of time at the disposal of present workers under 
the Commission. 

Significant as to future possibilities, not only in this, 
but in other branches of this work, is the fact that this league 
was very largely financed from the proceeds of the play con- 
ducted for the league's benefit by the Little Theatre, as men- 
tioned above under "Kecreational Drama." One recreation 
.activity promoted another with mutual benefit and benefit to 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 121 

the Community at large. No expenditure was incurred by the 
city for either, other than the Director's time and effort, in- 
dicating that expenditure by the City would be negligible in 
promoting this kind of activity to its greatest possibilities. 



Public Celebrations 

Somerville concentrated into its special 17th of June ac- 
tivities its observance of the historic events of 1775 in which 
this City's territory so prominently figured. A major part of 
the program for June 17 was in charge of the Recreation Com- 
mission, which thus cooperated with the Committee of Alder- 
men directing the observance. 

The program carried on by the Commission at Central 
Hill Park was for children and adults. It included children's 
games, athletic contests, procession, doll carriage parade, etc. 

This undertaking was financed by special appropriation 
from the Celebration's Fund. 

The preparations and the program itself were directed 
by workers under your Commission. 

In the Director's 1924 report is contained a detailed ac- 
count of the Community Christmas Observance for that year, 
directed by agents of your Commission. The objectives, pro- 
gram^ results, and estimated values are stated in this prev- 
ious report. (Pages 40-42.) A similar observance was con- 
ducted at Christmas time, 1925, with this difference in the 
procedure : — that the financial burden was assumed to larger 
degree by the City in 1925 than in 1924. The expenditures 
were shared by the Commission's fund and the Celebration's 
fund controlled by His Honor the Mayor. 



Summary of 1925 Activities 

This report, up to the present point, has dealt with all 
of the important divisions of the work during 1925: — (1) 
The Summer Playgrounds, (2) The Spring and Fall After- 
School Playgrounds, (3) The Saturday "Neighborhood" Play- 
grounds, (4) The Girls' Canning Activities, (5) Evening Rec- 
reation Centers, (6) The Neighborhood Center, (7) The Gen- 
eral Public Activities, (8) The Experiment in Community 
Recreational Drama, (9) Public Celebrations. In summary 
it may be said that a secure footing in all of these fields of 
undertaking has been secured and that the future will show 
that the year 1925 has seen far-reaching, effective work for 



122 ANNUAL REPORTS 

community welfare in Somerville. While some of the begin- 
nings have been necessarily modest and slow, this is a natural 
condition attendant upon the limitation of resources and 
equipment at the disposal of your Commission. Experiences 
during the past year prompt the expression of the estimate- 
that the near future will demonstrate that an effective basis 
for future work has been set up. 

Finances 

A complete general financial statement for 1925 is ap- 
pended to this report. 



ANALYSIS, OUTLOOK, AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

Five years have passed since the establishment, by City 
Ordinance, of the Public Welfare and Recreation Commis- 
sion. Its predecessor, The Playgrounds and Recreation Com- 
mission, had been established three years earlier. Eight 
years of legal recognition of Recreation as a distinct element 
of public welfare have passed. Naturally the Commission's 
first duty has been that of exploring — investigating the na- 
ture of its task : — studying the general relation of Recrea- 
tion to a Community's well-being, discovering the peculiar 
needs of Somerville, devising means for coping with local 
needs and problems ; and organizing its policies, corps of 
workers, and mode of procedure. Its financial expenditures 
have been extremely small, averaging during these eight years 
iLout four and one-half cents per capita a year. During this 
eight-year period, your Commission and the workers under its 
direction have eagerly and ceaselessly studied the problem in 
hand. From time to time your Commission and these workers 
have defined their conclusions and offered their recommenda- 
tions for use by the City Government in discharging its duty 
to Somerville in the field of this well-recognized department 
of modern public welfare. In all of these repeated recom- 
mendations, proposals for financial appropriations have been 
notably modest. The most severe economy has been practiced 
always. 

During this time a well-organized system of outdoor rec- 
reation for children, limited, unfortunately, to certain sec- 
tions of Somerville, restricted to a comparatively few days of 
each year, and seriously impeded by lack of facilities not with- 
in the Commission's power to provide, has been evolved; — 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 123 

a system whose results, it may be affirmed without hesitation, 
are far beyond the proportions of the money expended. And 
beginnings have been established in a recreation program for 
adults. 

That the exploratory time has passed, and that no fur- 
ther considerable progress can be made in meeting the very 
great recreational needs of this Community without a far- 
reaching movement on the part of the City Government cal- 
culated to extend this system to the entire Community, to re- 
move the impediments in the lack of facilities mentioned, and 
to make unnecessary the limiting of the benefits from your 
Commission's work to a small fraction of the year, is the cen- 
tral idea of this supplementary statement, offered by the Di- 
rector in response to the Commission's direction. 

The considerations on which this conclusion is based are 
here set forth, with an effort at brevity. 

To understand the situation it is necessary to keep in 
mind the paradoxical arrangement whereby the Recreation 
Commission has no jurisdiction over the facilities, which might 
be styled the tools, of Recreation. The play areas, maintained 
and controlled by two other Departments ; storage places ; 
basins for wading pools ; and the municipal bathing beach, 
are examples. Skating facilities and regulation in allotment 
of baseball fields to users, are other examples. While the 
officials of these other Departments have practised coopera- 
tion within the limits of possibility, the resources at their 
disposal are so extremely limited and the business of provid- 
ing and conditioning these "recreation tools" is so decidedly 
incidental to their general jurisdiction, that little is being 
accomplished in way of first-class Recreation service, in spite 
of the apparent desire to cooperate on the part of the officials 
concerned. 

Putting together the two propositions stated above, 
namely 

(1) that a far-reaching movement by the City Govern- 
ment, calculated to bring service to the entire Com- 
munity and to remove present limitations and im- 
pediments, is imperative for progress ; and 

(2) that the distribution of responsibility for, and 
control of, recreation facilities among several de- 
partments, is essential in the Somerville Recrea- 
tion situation ; the conclusion is obvious that the 
present situation demands from the City Govern- 
ment 



124 ANNUAL REPORTS 

(a) Provision for increased emphasis on those branch- 
es of the work under the City Engineer's, Build- 
ing, Water, and other Departments that have to do 
with Recreation facilities ; 

(b) Recognition of the essential fact that the grounds 
for play, buildings for storage, basins for wading 
pools, baseball diamonds, etc., are of the nature 
of "Recreation tools" the utilization of which should 
be largely directed by the Recreation Department ; 

(c) Substantial increase in appropriation of funds to 
all of these Departments, with specification that 
the Recreation Commission's intentions and plans 
be regarded and consulted in the disposition of these 
funds ; 

(d) Substantial increase in appropriation of funds to 
the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission. 

The foregoing generalization is reduced, in the following 
paragraphs, to specific enumeration of needs and difficulties ; 
and specific recommendations are given. In the presentation 
of these the order of consideration coincides with the division 
of the Commission's activities, as outlined in the earlier part 
of this Report. 

Playgrounds 

Progressive cities are obtaining a minimum standard of 
50 square feet per school child for play area. In Somerville, 
if those improvised play areas under supervision in the Sum- 
mer of 1925 be included, there are available about 10 square 
feet per child. Of the acreage included, more than half is in 
poor condition and without play-provoking equipment. If some 
of the school yards were conditioned, if the newly-purchased 
Cherry-Street site were made usable, and if the extensions 
were provided at Kent St., Joy St., Glen St., and Fellsway 
Playgrounds as recommended by the Director in the 1924 
Report, and again recommended in this Report, the addition- 
al areas would, at maximum, raise the play area to about 25 
square feet per school child. 

For play supervision on the already available areas only 
a seven-weeks program in Summer, and Saturday morning 
supervision in that end of Somerville east of Spring Hill, can 
be carried on because of the limitation of money available. 

No playground in Somerville is fully equipped to meet 
the needs of both boys and girls of various ages. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 125 

Lincoln Park, Kichard Trum Field, and Dilboy Field are 
the only playgrounds affording good baseball fields. More 
than one-half of Somerville's boys of baseball age must walk 
from points ranging from a half-mile to a mile away from 
these spots. 

Shelter houses are totally lacking on Somerville play- 
grounds. 

Constructive suggestions for remedying the situation are 
mentioned in the Director's comments earlier in this Report 
under the caption, "Summer Playgrounds — Grounds." They 
are here summarized and others are added : 

The Glen Street Playground is located on the vacant land 
(a large part of which is City property) at the junction of 
Glen and Oliver Streets, — a piece of land which the Director 
urges upon the Commission as extremely desirable for com- 
plete ownership by the City and very thorough-going conver- 
sion into a playground. Its operation during the past Sum- 
mer was a boon to hundreds of children who reside in an area 
hitherto totally unserved. The immediate district, within 
four minutes of this land, has a child population of several 
hundred, and the districts outlying are also unequipped with 
playgrounds. Several main thoroughfares for motor vehic- 
les — Franklin Street, Cross Street, Washington Street, Med- 
ford Street, Glen Street, and newly paved Pearl Street — pass 
within one or two minutes' walk of this playground, constitut- 
ing a menace to so many hundred children who might be freed 
from danger by means of a properly equipped, active and at- 
tractive playground. Regardless of more detailed plans the 
Director urges complete fencing of this area by a 12-ft. wire 
screen fence ; provision of drinking-water facilities and seats, 
re-surfacing, re-placement of baseball backstop ; provision of 
shelter or shade trees or both. 

• 

The surface of the Joy Street grounds has been some- 
what improved by operations by the City Engineer's Depart- 
ment. But there is imperative need of still further improve- 
ment of the ground, providing of shade trees, and the erec- 
tion of a durable screen fence for the triple purpose of pro- 
tecting the children at play from the extreme danger of in- 
tense commercial traffic through the adjoining streets (which 
are among the narrowest in the City,) protecting neighbor- 
ing property, and affording a touch of attractiveness to the 
grounds which at present have a most cheerless and unattrac- 
tive aopearance. Equipment is lacking. 



12(5 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Even under conditions of great improvement the total 
area of the Joy and Bennett playgrounds is so small that the 
provisions would be extremely inadequate for this locality, 
which has a greater child population within the immediate, 
vicinity of the playground than can be found in any other 
district of similar size in the City. It seems, therefore, that 
the City would do well to make some approach to providing at- 
tractive safe, and play-provoking features on the present area, 
and to consider seriously the possibilities of increasing or even 
multiplying the area of both of these playgrounds. 

At the Morse School Playground, there is need of resur- 
facing the ground. One section was formerly surfaced with 
concrete, which is now higher by inches than the remainder 
of the area; and that part which is not concreted is uneven 
and stony, with here and there uncovered parts of tree roots. 
Another screen fence along the Craigie Street side is almost 
a necessity both from the standpoint of safety on the play- 
ground and for the interest of the abutting property. 

The grounds of the Western Junior High School, where 
the area affords possibilities for the play of active games, but 
where the City has long delayed in providing presentable sur- 
face and any play equipment, meet only to a feeble degree the 
needs of an ever-increasing population in a district where no 
playground suitable for active boys' play is nearer than a 
mile almost in any direction. The Western Playground for 
boys and the Hodgkins School-yard unit for girls were jointly 
supervised. The combination has proved effective in spite of 
the wretched condition of both grounds. 

Equalty desirable, in my opinion, would be the carry- 
ing out of plans contemplated some time since for the im- 
provement of the rear end of Saxton C. Foss Park, with a 
view to getting the maximum use from this area for recrea- 
tion purposes. In the light of the rapid development of rec- 
reation activity on this playground, the urgent need of early 
attention to this improvement is still more apparent. 

Saxton C. Foss and Fellsway Playgrounds are in fact 
conducted on the same area, with segregation and separate 
supervision of boys and girls for sectioning off the area. The 
attendance and the activities have so increased as to place 
both the girls' and boys' units among the most successful play- 
grounds. 

As an alternative to the course recommended above, 
should there be question on the advisability of using a corner 
of Foss Park for a playground, attention is called to the 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 127 

land that comprises the so-called Fellsway playground. This 
land is owned in part by the City, and was formerly a part 
of a much larger open space that is gradually being used up 
by the erection, in various spots, of unsightly buildings. While 
the location is highly desirable for a play area, the city-owned 
land is too small and poorly surfaced; and the privately 
owned land is hilly, weedy and unkempt. The two taken to- 
gether would afford possibilities, provided that further en- 
croachment for building be forestalled. 

Whether anything additional is to be considered or not, 
the Director urges the imperative necessity of immediate 
provision of a high screen fence along the Boulevard side of the 
Fellsway grounds, both to protect children from the great num- 
ber of speeding automobiles on the Fellsway East, and to pro- 
tect motorists from flying baseballs, etc. Several cases of 
shattered windshields and flying bits of glass have come to the 
Director's notice recently. 

The attention of the Commission is again respectfully 
called to the necessity of more space for playing in the district 
served by the Kent St. Playground. This ground caters to a 
very populous section of our city, and is at present inadequate 
for the playing of active games. 



Play Supervision 

Following is an excerpt from the report of the Somerville 
Planning Board, 1923 : — 

''Supervision is crucial in playground operation. An un- 
supervised playground is for the child, hardly better than a 
vacant lot. On an unsupervised playground the large boys 
and rowdies will keep the girls and small boys off. There will 
be little play, and that ordinarily of poor quality, except for 
baseball ; and there is a tendency for boys' gangs to congregate 
and smoke, engage in low conversation or shoot craps. A situa- 
tion of this sort is most regrettable where there are thousands 
of children needing the peculiar moral and physical help which 
supervised play has to offer, for play provides one of the major 
opportunities for moral development on the part of the youth 
of the land. Family supervision of play is generally not pos- 
sible, particularly in those sections where the mother in her 
second or third story kitchen cannot watch the play or choose 
the associates of her child. A good playground director is a 
Godsend to the children of such families. There is supervised 
play during only about two months of the twelve on the Som- 



128 ANNUAL REPORTS 

erville playgrounds and on some playgrounds there was no 
supervision of play at all. In visiting the playgrounds, it was 
found that there was no play of value going on, as a rule, out- 
side of the days and hours and places where supervision was 
provided. This finding, however, is in accordance with the 
experience of American cities in general. During six months 
of the year play can be directed during the daylight hours 
when children are not at school, to the enormous advantage of 
the children and of all citizens." 

Under our present system, the greatest asset is a zealous 
and competent corps of part-time supervisors, who, in the 
Director's judgment, are underpaid. The problem of directing 
this corps is increasing with the growth of the system. 

During 1924 and 1925 the number of summer units has 
increased from 11 to 17, and the number of children under 
supervision has increased about 40 per cent. Direct su- 
perintendence by the Director of individual supervisors' work 
among their own groups of children is more difficult. Admin- 
istrative problems are larger and more complicated. Special 
supervision for special activities can no longer be delegated 
to part-time specialists, but requires full-time special supervi- 
sion. Any progress, and in fact maintenance of present 
efficiency, urgently demand 

(a) Employment of Assistants to the Director, who 
shall not be attached to any given playground in 
particular. 

(b) Increased provision for interplayground visitation 
and transportation of supplies. 

(c) Increased provision for expense of coordinating 
supervision through central headquarters. 

(d) Employment of additional persons to assist in 
supervision on larger units, — Lincoln Park, Foss- 
Fellsway, Glen Street. 

A problem that confronts us annually is that of "breaking 
in" new workers as a result of the fact that our skilful play 
leaders are attracted by higher salaries to other communities. 
The energy and time expended by your Director in this "break- 
ing in" process might be diverted into channels leading to im- 
provement of the system by new enterprise, if there were avail- 
able the very small fund necessary for advancing the salaries 
of the experienced workers. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 129 

For Supervision of Saturday play, the present Saturday 
corps should be doubled, as only about one-fourth of the City's 
area is now reached by the Saturday opportunities. 



Playground Equipment 

The report of the Planning Board, 1923, is again 
quoted : — 

"It is necessary that there should be sand boxes for the 
very young; swings, slides, the Giant Stride, and similar ap- 
paratus for the somewhat older but p re-adolescent boys and 
girls ; and there should be small ball fields for the younger 
adolescent boys and larger fields for the larger boys and men. 
In addition to these, provision for golf, tennis, wading, bath- 
ing, boating, outdoor basket ball or volley ball, skating, tobog- 
ganing, and a variety of other games and sports should be 
made. Of the existing playgrounds, Lincoln Park and the 
Richard Trum Playground are the only ones physically ad- 
equate in size to meet the needs of children, young and old, 
of their districts, even after they have been properly organized 
and equipped. 

"Often it is good policy to separate the playgrounds for 
large children from those for small children." 

"TYPES. In general it may be said that there should be small 
playgrounds for little children, that is children under school 
age, ranging from a city lot to a quarter of an acre in size, 
equipped with sand boxes for the very young children, and 
seats under the trees for their mothers and nurses. There 
should be one of such playground within one-eight of a mile of 
every home. For children of elementary school age, there 
should be a larger playground equipped with apparatus, wad- 
ing pool, volley ball and basket ball courts, and an outdoor 
gymnasium, within a quarter-mile of each home. For children 
over 12 years of age, a play field is necessary upon which sev- 
eral games of baseball may proceed at the same time. Other 
games as tennis, football, soccer, volley ball, should also be 
provided for. This playground should also be at least sev- 
eral acres in size and should be located within one-half mile of 
every home. To meet these standardized needs of the populace 
of Somerville, it would be then necessary to increase several- 
fold, both the playground space and the amount of supervision 
available." 



130 ANNUAL RErORTS 

"In the above suggestions, no criticism of the quality of 
the present supervision of playgrounds is intended, for the in- 
vestigators have been most favorably impressed with the char- 
acter of supervised play so far provided. What is suggested, 
is an increase in quantity, which means eventually a several- 
fold increase of the appropriation for play purposes in the city. 
Such an increased appropriation should come back to the city 
many-fold in the form of healthier, happier and better cit- 
izens." 

The same Planning Board reported in 1923 the following 
general recommendation regarding establishment, equipment, 
and supervision of playgrounds : — 

"The program for Somerville's playground improve- 
ment should include three things : first, the provision of 
apparatus for the playgrounds already established and 
supervised; second, provision during six months of con- 
tinuous supervision for all the playgrounds already exist- 
ing; and third, the provision of supervised playgrounds 
with adequate apparatus for areas not yet served." 

More specific recommendations have been made in this 
Teport under the captions "Summer Playgrounds" and "Satur- 
day — and afternoon Playgrounds," and they are included near 
the close of this report in a general list of recommendations. 



Drama and Dramatics in Community Recreation 

Kegrettable from the civic point of view is the inability 
of the Recreation organization to respond to the opportunities 
for developing Somerville's local social-civic spirit through the 
medium of recreational community drama, pageantry, and 
allied arts of expression. That the possibilities are great, and 
that hundreds of adult persons in the City are eager for munic- 
ipal encouragement and leadership has been amply dem- 
i onstrated by the experiment reported in 1921 and continued as 
•reported in 1925. 

Voluntary leadership has carried the experiment to the 
present conclusion. But voluntary leadership on the part of 
a non-resident cannot be had always. And it is physically 
impossible for the present part-time paid workers under the 
Commission to carry on this work in addition to the other 
work discussed in this report. A very moderate increase of 
funds could make possible a worthwhile program of Recreation 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 131 

in Somerville that could add a much-needed aesthetic note to 
Somerville life; offer an antidote for some modern commercial- 
ized pleasure-habits that are more dissipative than recreation- 
al ; serve the City by its performances on such occasions as the 
observance of public holidays, etc; and furnish a medium for 
financing other recreational activities, so as to enable the City 
Government to promote varied Kecreation without paying for 
it. An example of this last possibility is found in the financ- 
ing last Summer of the young men's baseball league from the 
proceeds of the Little Theatre's dramatic production. 

The Director recommends urgently the appropriation of 
not more than flOO for initial expenditure for promotion of 
this branch of Recreation during 1926 as encouragement to 
non-official, non-governmental agencies, who can easily meet 
the financial needs of its continuance, if the City will lend, 
through your Commission, its official leadership. 

General Public Activities 

In general public activities during the past year the out- 
standing feature is the Twilight Amateur Baseball League 
promoted by your Commission. Two such leagues could be 
organized during the coming year, with greater results in each. 

So strongly have the possibilities in this direction been 
demonstrated that the Director is fully convinced, with work- 
ers and facilities provided, and with very small expense, that 
there could be rapidly developed in Somerville a far-reaching 
organization of young men who would be actively interested 
in an all-year-round program of indoor and outdoor sports, 
with great profit to themselves physically, socially, and moral- 
ly, and with immeasurable benefit to the Community at large. 
Such development is, of course, impossible with the present 
limited organization of workers, and with the extreme limit- 
ations of time at the disposal of present workers under the 
Commission. Accordingly, in the proposed budget of 1926 
needs, there is included an item calling for a small sum for 
promotion of this business. 

That there is equal demand for and equal value to the 
Community in, similar leagues for Hockey and Basketball in 
season, the Director has had ample evidence during study of 
the local situation. For these, provision should be made by 
providing the physical facilities through the proper depart- 
ments and by appropriation of a small sum for promotion of 
these activities by your Commission. Examples of a mode of 
precedure and of noteworthy success at moderate cost are at 
hand, in the experience of several near-by municipalities. 



132 ANNUAL REPORTS 

General Recommendations 

To meet in part the needs of Kecreation in Somerville, 
the following recommendations are enumerated. They are 
based on the considerations given in this report, and divided 
into two groups. Group 1 has to do with those branches of 
the work to which, by the present activities, your Commission 
is definitely committed. Group 2 includes suggestions look- 
ing toward expansion of the plans to raise municipal recreation 
from its hitherto undefined level, to the more definite and 
comprehensive plans to which it is destined if Somerville is 
to meet the problem presented by the large and congested pop- 
ulation. 



(1) Employment of a part-time, all-year clerical work- 
er to assist the Director and to act as clerk for the 
Commission. 

(2) Expansion of the Summer Playgrounds organiza- 
tion to include new units for boys at the newly 
purchased City land at Elm and Cherry Sts. ; the 
Southern Junior High School grounds ; the North- 
eastern Junior High School grounds; and the 
Brown School premises. 

(3) Providing a playground surface and equipment 
on the vacant land (a large part of which is City 
property) at the junction of Oliver and Glen 
Streets, the equipment to include fencing, replace- 
ment of baseball back-stop, swing-frames, seats, 
shelter-house and shade trees. 

(4) Early adjustment of Northeast corner of Foss 
Park to use for athletics purposes, or the alterna- 
tive suggested earlier in this report under the Cap- 
tion, "Summer Playgrounds — Grounds." 

(5) Securing more adequate play space and improved 
conditions of present areas at Joy Street, Bennett, 
and Kent Street grounds. 

(6) Early completion of the playground in the rear of 
the Western Junior High School. 

(7) Resurfacing the Morse School Playground and 
erection of high screen fence on westerly side of 
this area. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 133 

(8) Purchase of land for additional playgrounds, es- 
pecially for serving smaller children near their 
homes. 

(9) The planting of some shade trees on several of the 
playgrounds to provide natural shelter for the fu- 
ture. 

(10) Provision for a male supervisor at 'Central Hill and 
Morse playgrounds jointly. 

(11) Installing of additional permanent framework for 
swings and teeters at the Morse Playground. 

(12) Increasing the length of Summer supervision pe- 
riod by at least one week. 

(13) Provision for increase in the Summer supervisory 
corps to meet the needs mentioned earlier in this 
report under the heading "Summer Playgrounds — 
Supervision." 

(14) Increasing from 8 to 16, the number of Saturday 
"Neighborhood Playground" units, so as to make 
the organization City-wide. (See "Saturday and 
Afternoon Playgrounds" above.) 

(15) Expansion of the After-School supervision of play- 
grounds to provide three sessions per week at each 
unit instead of two sessions, and 4 units instead 
of 2. 

(16) Provision of the necessary field equipment for ten- 
nis, Field Hockey, Soccer, etc., for use at these 
after-school sessions. 

(17) Provision for outdoor active recreation in winter, 
for children and adults, such as hockey, tobogan- 
ning, and skiing. 

(18) Provision of additional skating rinks for the gen- 
eral public in winter. 

(19) Providing a Recreation Center, with others to fol- 
. low (for women) on parallel lines with those of the 

young men's centers. 

(20) Provision for additional facilities for indoor athlet- 
ics and physical exercise in all Recreation Centers 
for men. 

(21) Employment, in the Recreation Center undertak- 
ing, of special leaders for special activities. 



/ 



134 ANNUAL REPORTS 

(22) Provision for securing workers for the Evening Rec- 
reation Centers who have the special qualifications 
for that work, to overcome the present lack of ap- 
plicants for this work. 

(23) Provision for increased publicity and public in- 
formation concerning the objectives and opportuni- 
ties of -the Recreation Centers. 

(24) Appropriation of funds for promotion of Adults* 
Athletic Leagues, in Baseball, Hockey, Basketball, 
etc. 

(25) Appropriation for promoting Community drama 
and kindred activities as Community Recreation. 

II 

Pageantry 

Dramatic Clubs 

Other Activities in Drama 

Forum 

Civic Meetings 

Music Week 

Lectures 

Hockey Rinks. (Some expense incurred under 
this" item in 1924.) 

Aquatic Sports Day at Somerville Beach 

Vacant Lot Playground Campaign. 

Marble Tournament 

Public "Walks" 

Respectfully submitted 

Francis J. Mahoney, 

Director. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION 135 

Appendix 

General Financial Statement 

|7,999.90 were expended from the City Treasury, for the 
operations here reported. The sum appropriated had been 
18,000.00. 

Following is a general statement of financial expendi- 
tures : — 

Summer Playgrounds 

Supervision $2,229 00 

Supplies, Maintenance, Printing, etc. 1,208 00 

Janitor, Repair Man, Gen'l Helper 105 00 

Other Labor 8 00 

3,550 00' 

Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

Supervision 1,339 50 

Supplies 165 51 

1,505 01 

Evening Recreation Centers 

Supervision 310 00 

Supplies, Publicity, Printing 122 05 

432 05. 

Canning Activities 

Supervision and Instruction 420 00 

Supplies 48 81 

County Dues, (Paid to Middlesex 
County Bureau of Agriculture & 
Domestic Science) 100 00 

568 81 

Neighborhood Center 

Supervision 162 50 

Supplies, Rental, etc 37 50 

200 00 

Little Theatre & Adults' Baseball League 23 27 

Hockey Rink, Western Jr. High School 

Playground 28 35 

Director's Salary 1304 17 

Postage 31 18 

Clerical Help and Rental of Tynewriter 110 25 

Use jjf Automobile, Messengers, Tele- 
phone, Carfares and Maintenance Sun- 
dries 187 41 

Office Supplies 59 40 

Total $7,999 90 



136 ANNUAL REPORTS 



APPENDIX TO THE COMMISSION'S REPORT 

Public Welfare and Recreation Department 
Proposed Budget 
for 
1926 

I. SUMMER PLAYGROUNDS SEASON $5,925 

II. SATURDAY AND AFTERNOON PLAYGROUNDS 

(See Table 1) (Jan. 1 to June 30-Sept. 10 to 

Dec. 31 dV 2 months' program) 2,420 

III. EVENING CENTERS 1,150 

IV. GIRLS' CANNING ACTIVITIES 600 

V. NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE 800 

VI. MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 1400 

VII. SALARY, DIRECTOR 1300 

VIII. TYPEWRITER & ACCESSORIES 100 

IX. PART-TIME (All-year-round) CLERK 350 

X. USE OF AUTOMOBILE (12 months) 165 

XI. OFFICE SUPPLIES, POSTAGE, STATIONERY, Etc. 125 

XII. CONTINGENT 165 

TOTAL $14,500 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 137 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Organization — 1925 
C. A. C. Richardson, M. D., Chairman 
James A. Kiley 

LlZETTE L. VORCE 

Executive Clerk 
Laurence S. Howard 

Assistant Clerk 
Olive M. Stanley 

Agent 
George I. Canfield 

Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist 
Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Charles M. Berry, V. S. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
Herbert E. Bowman, Ph. G. 

Milk Collector and Dairy Inspector 
William H. Wallis 

Technician 
Georgia H. Moreland, Ph. G.-Ph. C. 

Milk Collector 
Francis W. Small 

Plumbing Inspector 
Duncan C. Greene 

School Nurses 
Grace M. Andrews, R. N. Gladys M. Grant, R. N. 

Health Nurses 

Helen B. Berry Mary L. Scott, R. N. 

Grace E. Pickering, R. N. 

Matron at Contagious Hospital 
Lillian E. Gould, R. N. 



138 ANNUAL REPORTS 



/ 



Office of the Board of Health,. 
City Hall, January 2, 1926. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : 

We respectfully submit the following as the forty-eighth 
annual report of the Board of Health in which is presented 
a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary condi- 
tion of the city and the business of the board for the year 
ending December 31, 1925. 

Nuisances 

A record of the nuisances abated during the year, in 
compliance with notices issued by the board, or under the 
board's direction, is presented in the following table : 

Complaints referred from 1924 1 

Complaints received during 1925 649 

650 

Complaints received with no just cause 19 

Complaints abated on verbal notice of Agent 124 

Complaints abated on notices sent 497 

Complaints referred to 1926 10 

650 

First notices sent 496 

Second and third notices sent 56 

Total notices sent 552 

Annually the cellars and alleyways of the city are ex- 
amined and the owners of property where unsanitary condi- 
tions exist are required to remedy the same. 

Record of Licenses and Permits Issued 

GOATS. Eight applications were received for permits 
to keep eight goats, all of which were granted. One applica- 
tion to keep one goat was refused. The fee is one dollar for 
each goat. 

HENS. Twenty-seven applications for permits to keep 
302 hens were received. Sixteen to keep 205 hens were grant- 
ed and eleven permits were refused. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 1 39 

COWS. Two applications for permits to keep two cows 
were received, which were granted. 

GREASE. Fifteen applications were received for permits 
for eighteen teams to collect grease, which were granted. The 
fee is two dollars for each team. 

MELTING AND RENDERING. Three parties have 
been licensed to carry on the business of melting and render- 
ing, for which a fee of one dollar is charged. 

MASSAGE AND MANICURE. Seventy persons have 
been licensed to practice massage and manicure. The fee is 
one dollar for each license. 

SALE OF ALCOHOL. The statutes provide that no 
person, firm or corporation other than a registered druggist 
shall engage in the business of manufacturing, buying, sell- 
ing or dealing in methyl alcohol, or wood alcohol so called or 
denatured alcohol, or any preparation containing more than 
three percent of any of the said alcohols, without being licens- 
ed so to do by the board of health. 

Under the provisions of this act thirty licenses have been 
issued. A fee of one dollar was received for each license. 

BOTTLING. CARBONATED BEVERAGES. Chapter 
303, Acts of 1921 provides that no person shall engage in the 
manufacturing or bottling of carbonated non-alcoholic bev- 
erages, soda waters and mineral and spring water without a 
permit from the board of health. Five such permits were 
granted, a fee of ten dollars being charged in each case. 

Stables 

No person has the legal right to erect, occupy or use 
any building in this city, as a stable, without obtaining a 
license from the board for such occupancy. Each application 
is referred to the Agent of this board and no license is grant- 
ed unless all regulations of the board are complied with. The 
following is a record of applications received and licenses 
granted : 

Applications pending from 1924 

Applications received during 1925 7 



7 

Licenses granted 3 

Licenses refused 4 



140 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Board of Infants 

Twenty applications having been made to the State De- 
partment of Public Welfare for licenses to care for children 
in this city were referred to this board under provisions of 
Chapter 119 of the General Laws, and were approved. 

Lying-in Hospitals 

Two applications having been made to the State Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare for licenses to maintain lying-in- 
hospitals in this city were referred to this board under the 
provisions of Section 71 of Chapter 111 of the General Laws 
and were approved. 

There were 1110 deaths and sixty-one stillbirths in the 
city during the year, as specified in the following table. 

Deaths at Somerville Hospital 122 

Deaths at hospital for contagious diseases 8 

Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland Avenue) 41 

Deaths at city home 7 

Deaths at other institutions 54 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
Mortality in Somerville in 1925 



141 



















(H 








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42 


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> 

o 



I. Epidemic, Endemic and 
Infectious Diseases. 

1A Typhoid Fever 

7 Measles 

8 Scarlet Fever 

9 Whooping Cough 

10 Diphtheria 

11 Influenza 

21 Erysipelas 

31 Tuberculosis of Lungs 

32 Tubercular Meningitis 

33 Tubercular Peritonitis 

34 Tuberculosis of verterbral 
column 

35 Tuberculosis of joints 

37A Acute Disseminated Tub- 
erculosis 

38 Syphilis 

41 Septicaemia 

II. General Diseases not 
Includes in Class I. 

43 Cancer of Buccal Cavity 

44 Cancer of Stomach A: Liver 

45 Cancer of Peritoneum, In- 

testines and Rectum 

46 Cancer of Female Genital 

Organs 

47 Cancer of breast 

48 Cancer of Skin 

49 Cancer of other Organs 

51 Acute Rheumatic Fever 

52 Chronic Rheumatism 

57 Diabetes Mellitus 

58 A Pernicious Ana?mia 

62 Diseases of the Thymus 

Gland 

65B Hodgkins Disease 

69 Other General Diseases...... 

III. Diseases of the Nervous 
System and of the Organs 
of the Special Sense. 

70 Encephalitis 

71A Simple Meningitis 

71B Non-Epidemic Cerebro- 
spinal Meningitis 

72 Tabes Dorsalis 

73 Other Diseases of the Spi- 
nal Cord 

74A Cerebral Hemorrhage 

74B Cerebral Thrombosis 

75A Hemiplegia 

75B Others under this title 

77 Other forms of Mental Al- 

ienation 

78 Epilepsey 

80 Infantile Convulsions 

81 Chorea 

84 Other Diseases of the Ner- 
vous System 



1 
3 



10 



1 



11 



1 
3 
3 
5 
3 
2 
3 

39 
5 
5 



4 

49 

22 

14 
8 
1 

22 
3 
1 
4 

12 

2 
1 

4 



2 
3 

2 
2 

2 

92 
4 
4 
2 

2 
3 
2 
1 



142 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Mortality in Somerville in 1925 — Continued 





>> 

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IV. 

89 


Diseases of the Circula- 
tory System. 

Angina Pectoris 

Other Diseases of the Heart 
Aneurysm 


2 

16 


2 
15 


2 
20 


2 
11 


2 
22 


1 

19 


3 
6 
I 

11 
1 






3 
11 


7 
10 


3 
24 


27 


90 
91A 


12 


8 


174 

1 


91B 
92 


Arterio Sclerosis 

Embolism 


20 
2 


14 

1 


13 


13 

1 


14 


12 


4 


10 


13 
1 


18 


14 

1 


156 


96 


Other Diseases of the Cir- 
culatory System 










1 


V. 
99A 


Diseases of the Respira- 
tory System. 

Acute Bronchitis ... 




1 


1 
16 


2 




1 
I 
6 








2 




6 
2 

81 
1 

52 
6 
2 

1 

2 

1 

3 

9 

2 
5 
6 
5 
2 
2 
2 


99B 


Chronic Bronchitis.. 












100A 


Broncho Pneumonia 

Capillary Bronchitis 

Lobar Pneumonia .. 


7 


9 


13 


11 






2 


4 


5 


8 
1 
4 

1 


•100 B 






101A 


9 


14 
2 

1 


7 


4 


6 

1 


2 









2 

2 


4 
1 


103 


Congestion of the Lungs... 

Asthma 

Other Diseases of the Res- 
piratory System 









105 






107C 


















1 
1 


VI. 
109 B 


Diseases of the Digestive 
System. 

Septic Sore Throat 














1 








111A 


Ulcer of the Stomach 

Other Diseasesof theStom- 
mach 














1 






112 










i 

1 






1 
3 






1 


113 


Diorrhea and Enteritis 
(under 2 years) 

Diorrhea and Enteritis 
(2 years and over) ... 


2 






1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


2 




114 


1 


1 

1 
1 






117 


Appendicitis 


1 


1 
1 


1 
2 




1 
1 








118B 


Intestinal Obstruction 

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Biliary Calculi 












T22B 


1 
1 




1 
1 
1 






123 












124 


Other Diseases of the Liver 
Peritonitis 

Non Venereal Diseases 

of the genito-urinary 

System and Annkxa. 

Acute Nephritis 

Chronic Nephritis 

Other Diseases of the Kid- 
neys 

Calculi of the Urinary 
Passages 












1 










126 


•I 




VII. 
.128 






1 
4 

1 


2 


1 
5 

1 














129 
131 


3 


2 


6 


3 


2 




1 


4 


2 


2 
34 

2 


.132 










1 










133 


Diseases of the Bladder 

. The Puerperal State 

Accidents of Pregnancv ... 
Puerperal Hemorrhage ... 
Cesarean Section 






















1 


1 
1 

2 

2 

1 


VIII 
143C 








1 












1 
I 1 




144 












1 




1 






1145A 


















146 


Puerperal Septicaemia 

Puerperal Albumenaria ... 




1 






1 

1 


2 












148 






1 


1 




1 






4 














1 


4 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
Mortality in Somerville in 1925 — Continued 



143 





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H 


IX. Diseases of the Skin and 
of the Cellular Tissues. 

152 Furuncle 


1 

1 

2 

1 








1 
















2 




1 




















2 


154 Other Diseases of the Skin 






















2 


X. Diseases of the Bones 
and Organs of Locomotion 






1 


















1 


XI. Malformations. 

159A Congenital Hydrocepha- 
lus. 
















1 

1 

1 
2 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 


2 


159B Congenital Malformations 




















1 
1 

2 
2 


2 

2 


159C Others under this title ... 


2 

3 


6 


1 

4 
1 














1 

1 
9 
4 


XII. Early Infancy. 
160 Congenital Debility 


4 
3 


3 
2 


1 
6 
2 
1 

2 


2 
2 


1 
3 
1 
1 

1 


1 

4 
2 


161A Premature Birth 

161B Injury at Birth 


19 

43 

14 

5 

10 

1 
1 
3 


162 Other Diseases 


2 


2 








XIII. Old Age. 
164 Senilitv 






1 


1 


1 


XIV. External Causes. 

166 Suicide by Corosive Sub- 

stances „ 

167 Suicide by Poisonous Gas 








170 Suicide by Fire Aims 






1 




1 






1 








177 Accidental Poisoning 




1 










1 


178 Accidental Asphyxia by 
Fire 






















1 

1 
1 


1 
4 

5 

1 

1 


179 Accidental Burns 


1 

1 
2 

1 


1 
1 
















1 


1 
1 


180 Accidental Mechanical 
Suffocation 






2 






i 




181 Accidental gas poisoning.. 
183 Accidental killing by 
Firearms 








185 Accidental Fall 


1 

1 


2 

1 
1 






2 


1 


1 


2 


"i" 

2 


2 


11 
2 


188A Railroad Accident 






188C Auto Accident 






1 


1 


2 

1 


4 

1 
1 


15 

2 


188E Motorcycle Accident 






188F Injuries by other Vehicles 






1 
















2 

1 


197 Homicide by Firearms 


109 


1 

103 


















XV. Ill-Definkd Causes. 


110 


99 

1 


115; 


98 

1 


64 


55 i 


f5 


103 


86 


103 


Total Deaths 






1110 



.'Population census Qq m9 

■Death rate per thousand ......".....!..!..!..!.....!.!."!.'.'" 11 20 



144 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



DEATHS BY AGES 



Ages. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Under one 


146 


93 


53 


One to two 














20 


11 


9 


Two to three 














7 


4 


3 


Three to five 














16 


10 


6 


Five to ten 














16 


8 


s: 


Ten to fifteen 














12 


5 


7 


Fifteen to twenty 














16 


5 


11 


Twenty to thirty 














48 


16 


32 


Thirty to forty •. 














43 


18 


25 


Forty to fifty 














82 


32 


50 


Fifty to sixty 














129 


62 


67 


Sixty to seventy 














197 


90 


107 


Seventy to eighty 














220 


103 


117 


Eighty to ninety 














127 


46 


81 


Ninety and over 














31 


8 


23 


Total 














1110 


511 


599 



Total Deaths During the Last Ten Years 



Year. 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1023 

1924 

1925 

Average 



death rate per 1000 for ten years 



No. of 

Deaths. 

1,081 


Rate 
per 
1,000 

12.01 


1,067 


11.85 


1,533 


16.84 


1,074 


11.30 


1,137 


12.22 


986 


10.38 


1,019 


10.41 


1,108 


11.30 


979 


9.79 


1,110 


11.20 




11.73 



Table Showing the Five Principal Causes of Death in Somerville 

in 1925 



Heart 
Disease. 


Arterio 
Sclerosis 


Pneumonia 
All Forms. 


Cancer 

All Forms. 


Apoplexy. 


a ® 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


o . 

n 2 

£ a) 

3ft 


S8 


P QJ 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


Number of 
Deaths. 


f-< Q, 

& o 
£8 

3© 


^ 2 

|« 


,q o 


201 


20.29 


156 


15.75 


133 


13.43 


120 


12.11 


92 


9.28 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



145 



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146 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Diseases Dangerous to the Public Health 

This board has adjudged that the diseases known as 
actinomycosis, anterior poliomyelitis, anthrax, Asiatic cholera, 
cerebrospinal meningitis, chicken pox, diphtheria, dog-bite, 
(requiring anti-rabic treatment), dysentery, German measles, 
glanders, hookworm disease, infectious disease of the eye, in- 
fluenza, leprosy, malaria, measles, mumps, pellagra, plague, 
pneumonia, (Lobar only), rabies, scarlet fever, septic sore 
throat, small pox, tetanus, trichinosis, tuberculosis (all 
forms), typhoid fever, typhus fever, whooping cough, yellow 
fever, are infectious or contagious and dangerous to the public 
health and safetv within the meaning of the statutes. Phvsi- 
cians are required to report immediately to the board every 
case of either of these diseases coining under their care and 
postal cards conveniently printed and addressed are supplied 
to them for the purpose. On receipt of a card from a physi- 
cian, the principal of the school in the district in which the 
patient resides, the librarian of the public library and state 
board of health are notified. 

Specimens and Supplies 

Outfits for specimens to be examined for tuberculosis, 
diphtheria and typhoid fever, and diphtheria anti-toxin, vac- 
cine lymph and nitrate of silver solution may be obtained at 
the laboratory and at the following places : 

Edward Edwards, 25 Union Square 

R. A. Peckham, 154 Perkins Street 

Ernest M. Yose, 310 Broadway 

Ernest B. McClure, 529 Medford Street 

George E. Wardrobe, 716 Broadwav 

Willis S. Furbush & Co., 1153 Broadway 

Hall Drug Co., Hobbs Building, Davis Square 

John B. Maitland, 288 Highland Avenue 

Hereafter the Agent of this Board will collect, daily, at 
five o'clock p. in., all specimens left at culture stations for 
examination, prior to that hour. 

Physicians desiring reports on the following day, of 
specimens taken after this collection has been made must de- 
posit same at the City Hall, in the receptacle provided, be- 
fore nine-thirty p. m. 

Results of all examinations of specimens received at the 
City Hall prior to nine-thiry p. m., will be reported to the 
physicians on the following morning. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



147 



Medical Inspection at Schools 

The medical inspection of the schools of Somerville which 
was instituted in December 1907, has been continued during 
the year. The value of the system has been constantly dem- 
onstrated, and the work has been done in a very satisfactory 
manner. There has been harmony of action between the 
board of health and the school board, and the school princi- 
pals and teachers have very generally co-operated with the 
inspectors in making the system as successful as possible. 

The inspectors make daily visits to the schools under 
their charge, and to them are referred all children who show 
evidences of disease or abnormal conditions. Children who 
are found to be unfit to remain in school are sent home, ac- 
companied by a slip properly tilled out advising that the fam- 
ily physician be consulted. The inspectors also make an an- 
nual inspection of all the children in the schools, and any 
defects discovered are called to the attention of the parents. 
Monthly inspections of the school buildings and premises are 
made, and suggestions or criticisms are referred to the proper 
authorities. Every effort is made to protect the health of the 
children and to co-operate with the parents in keeping the 
"Children in as normal a condition as possible. 

In accordance with the provisions of the statute, tests of 
eight and hearing are made by the principals or teachers. 

District No. 1 

Inspector Dr. Francis Shaw, 57 Cross Street. 
Schools Prescott, Hanscom, Edgerly and Boys' Voca- 
tional Schools. 

* 4 

I 

District No. 2 



Inspector Dr. Edward J. Dailey, 46 Bow Street. 
Schools Baxter, Knapp, Perry and Southern Junior 



BEigh Schools. 



District No. 3 

Inspector Dr. Walter Jellis, 1028 Broadway. 
Schools Bennett, Pope, Cummings and Proctor 
Schools. 

District No. 4 



Inspector Dr. W. L. Bond, 322 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Morse, Carr, Durell and Burns Schools. 



148 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



District No. 5 

Inspector Dr. H. M. Stoodley, 283 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Brown, Bingham, Forster and Northeastern 
Junior High Schools. 

District No. 6 

Inspector Dr. H. Cholerton, 94 College Avenue. 
Schools Western Junior High, Lincoln, Highland, 
Cutler and Lowe Schools. 

District No. 7 

Inspector Dr. E. F. Sewall, 281 Broadway. 
Schools Glines and High Schools. 

District No. 8 

Inspector Dr. M. W. White, 21 Walnut Street. 
Schools Parochial. 

During the year 9,976 children have been referred to 
the inspectors during their daily visits, and 475 have been 
sent home because of illness. 

The following list will show the classes of diseases and 
defects which have been found in the schools, except defects 
of sight and hearing: 

List of Diseases and Number of Cases Reported 

1. Infectious Dieases: — 

Chicken Pox 86 

Measles , 41 

Mumps 17 

Scarlet Fever 1 

Whooping Cough 9 

Total 154 

2. Diseases of the nose and throat: — 

Enlarged tonsils and adenoids 787 

Inflammatory diseases 331 

Other abnormal conditions 1 

Total 1,119 

3. Diseases of the eyes: — 

Inflammatory conditions 35 

Foreign bodies 2 

Other abnormal conditions 33 

Total 70 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 149 

Diseases of the ears: — 

Inflammatory conditions 62 

Other abnormal conditions 34 



Total 96 

5. Diseases of the skin: — 

Eczema 56 

Herpes 43 

Impetigo 126 

Pediculosis 299 

Scabies 34 

Tinea 9 

Miscellaneous conditions 330 

Total 897 

6. Miscellaneous diseases: — 

Diseases of the circulatory system 21 

Diseases of the digestive system 62 

Diseases of the lymphatic system 47 

Diseases of the nervous system 10 

Diseases of the respiratory system 66 

Wounds and injuries 66 

Diseases of the teeth 16 

Other conditions 35 

Total 323 

Total number of diseases 2,659 

Vaccinations performed 146 

Examinations for vaccinations 1,020 

Certificates to work 194 

Bacteriological Work 

The report of the work of this department is made by 
Frank L. Morse, M. D., on a subsequent page and becomes a 
part of this report. 

Undertakers 

Under the provisions of Section 49 of Chapter 114 of the 
General Laws, twenty-four persons have been duly licensed 
as undertakers. 

Examinations of Plumbers 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
plumbers, consisting of the chairman of the board of health, 
the inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be 
appointed by the board of health. This board appointed Dun- 
can C. Green, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place of 
expert. The number of licenses granted will be found in the 
report of the inspector of buildings. 



150 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Health Nurses 



There are at present five nurses employed by this board. 
Two of these are employed as school nurses and the work of 
the others consists of follow-up work regarding tuberculosis 
cases and post-natal baby hygiene work. 

The reports of the school nurses are made a part of the 
report of the School Committee and those of the other nurses 
are made a part of this report being submitted in detail in 
subsequent pages. 

Infant Hygiene Clinics 

During the past year under the supervision of this board,, 
clinics have been held every Thursday afternoon at the Ben- 
nett Schoolhouse and every Friday afternoon at the Bingham 
Hchqolhouse except when those days were holiday's. On 
September 29, 1925 a new clinic was established at the Edger- 
ly Schoolhouse at which fourteen clinics have been held on 
Tuesday afternoon. The attendance for the year at these 
three clinics was 5,101. The average weekly attendance at the 
Bennett Schoolhouse w T as 30, at the Bingham Schoolhouse 64 
and at the Edgerly Schoolhouse 22. 

This work is of inestimable value and the results are 
very far reaching. 

C. A. C. Richardson, 
James A. Kiley, 

LlZETTE L. YORCE, 

Board of Health. 

Attest: 

Laurence S. Howard, Executive Clerk. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 151 

REPORT OF HEALTH NURSES 

Somerville, Mass. 

January 2, 1926. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

We submit the following report of work performed by 
us in infant hygiene, post natal and tuberculosis cases for 
the year ending December 31, 1925. 

Infant Hygiene 

Infants reported as born in Somerville during 1925 1,487 

Infants born elsewhere resident in Somerville 420 

Pairs of twins born in Somerville 14 

Sets of triplets born in Somerville 1 

Still-births in Somerville 61 

Infants who moved away from Somerville 115 

Infants reported with Ophthalmia Neonatorum 9 

Infants reported with Conjunctivitis 14 

Infants reported with Infantile Paralysis 1 

There were one hundred and three deaths of infants 
under one year of age in Somerville during the past year as 
shown in the following table : 

Prematurity 35 

Congenital diseases 39 

Intestinal diseases 5. 

Accidental Injury 3 

Pneumonia and other diseases 21 



Total 103 

Infants dying in Somerville residence elsewhere 23- 

Total attendance at Baby Welfare Clinics during 1925 5,101 

New registrations during 1925 532 

Average attendance during 1925 40 

Tuberculosis 

Pulmonary tuberculosis cases reported in 1925 116 

Other forms of tuberculosis reported in 1925 28 

Patients admitted to Sanatoria 51 

Patients previously reported in Sanatoria 48 

Deaths in Somerville (Pulmonary 39-Other Forms 13) 52 

Deaths in Sanatoria 18-Discharged 46 64 

Patients now in Sanatoria 46 

Patients temporarily out of Somerville 25 

Patients who have moved away from Somerville 36 



152 



A.NNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE SHOWING AGES AND SEX OF CASES IN THIS CITY 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 



Ages 



Under fifteen years 

From fifteen to twenty years 
From twenty to thirty years 
From thirty to forty years... 
Over forty years 

Total 



S> 


:x 


Male 


Female 


2 


3 


5 


7 


18 


28 


13 


12 


14 


14 


52 


64 



Total 



o 

12 
46 
25 

28 



116 



Other Forms of Tuberculosis. 



Ages 


Sex 


Total 


Male 


Female 




Under fifteen years 


4 
2 
2 
2 
4 


4 
2 

2 
2 
4 


8 


From fifteen to twentv years 


4 


From twentv to thirty vears 


4 


From thirty to forty years 


4 


Over forty years 


8 






Total 


14 


14 


28 







Miscellaneous 

Typhoid Fever cases reported (died 1) . 



13 



Recapitulation of Visits 

Baby Hygiene 8,037 

Tuberculosis 822 

Miscellaneous 558 



Total visits 9,417 



Bespeetfiilly submitted, 

Helen B. Berry, 
Mary L. Scott, B. N., 
Grace E. Pickering, B. N., 

Health Nurses. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



153 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION 

■ Somerville, Mass., 
January 2, 1926. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present the report of the Department of Med- 
ical Inspection for the year 1925 including statistics of the 
Contagious Hospital. 



Visits 

Scarlet Fever — Each case must be inspected before release from 
quarantine to see that the condition of the patient is suit- 
able for release 197 

Diphtheria — Before patients are released from quarantine two 

successive negative cultures must be obtained 106 

Contagious Hospital 384 

Total number of visits 687 



Disease 
Diphtheria 
Scarlet Fever 
Miscellaneous 



Contagious Disease Hospital 



In Hospital Ad- 
Jan. 1, 1925 mitted 
2 62 


Discharged 
Well or 
Improved 
59 


Dead 
4 


In 


Hospital 

Jan. 
1, 1926 

1 


3 85 


78 


2 




8 


12 


9 


2 




1 



The daily average of patients was 7.83. 



LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS 

Diphtheria 

Negative Positive Total 

January 120 8 128 

February 77 3 80 

March 55 2 57 

April 55 12 67 

May 92 35 127 

June 44 9 53 

July 69 6 75 

August 34 7 41 

September 44 14 58 

October 50 16 66 

November 60 4 64 

December 67 5 72 

Totals 767 121 888 



154 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Tuberculosis 


Negative 
18 
18 
21 
15 
17 

7 

7 

1 

4 
11 

6 
12 


Positive 
\» 

2 

2 
7 
4 
5 
5 
2 

1 
3 
1 


Total. 
2') 




20 




23 




22 




21 




12 




12 




3 




4 




12 




9 




13 







34 



171 



Typhoid 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 

Examinations made for Malaria, Oph- 
thalmia, Paratyphoid, Gonorrhea and 

Pneumonia 

Total examinations 



Negative Positive TotaL 



2 


1 


3 


3 


2 


5 











6 


2 


8 


4 





4 


2 





2 


4 





4 


1 


3 


4 


1 





1 











2 





2 


2 


1 


3 



36 



21 
1,116 



Tuberculosis 

During 1925 there were 52 deaths from Tuberculosis 
including all forms, 39 of which were of the pulmonary type. 
This record shows an increase from the previous year when 
46 deaths were reported. 

All patients ill with the disease coming to the attention 
of the board have either been supervised at their homes by 
the Public Health Nurses, or have been placed in sanatoria 
when such treatment was needed. 

The tuberculosis ward at the Contagious Hospital which 
was closed on September 1, 1921 on account of the small num- 
ber of patients in the hospital, was reopened during July 
and August as a Preventorium for children who were under- 
nourished or lived in families where tuberculosis cases existed. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 155 

In this work the board was assisted by a contribution 
provided by the Tuberculosis Seal Sale. 

During these two months 105 children were residents 
at the Preventorium for a total of 1278 days, the average stay 
being 12 days. Much good was accomplished among these 
children, marked improvement being observed in their phys- 
ical condition, and it should be maintained each summer. 



l ? 



Infant Hygiene Clinics 

On January 1, 1922 the board with the approval of His 
Honor the Mayor, assumed the care of the Infant Hygiene 
Clinics previously maintained by Somerville Chapter of 
the American Bed Cross. These clinics have been held on 
Thursday afternoon at the Bennett School and Friday after- 
noon at the Bingham School thruout the year. On September 
29, 1925 a clinic was established at the Edgerly School and 
has been held on Tuesday afternoon weekly. An average 
attendance of 64 at the Bingham School, 30 at the Bennett 
School and 22 at the Edgerly School has been attained. 532 
new babies have been under supervision at the clinics where 
advice has been given to the mothers by the attending phy- 
sician, and in many instances the infants have been visited at 
home by the Public Health Nurses in order that the advice 
may be properly followed out. This work is unquestionably 
of great value in conserving the health of new born infants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank L, Morse, 
Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist. 



156 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS 

Somerville, Mass., 
January 2, 1926. 

To the Board of Health 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit the following as my report for the year ending 
December 1, 1925. 



Inspections 

The following table shows the number of inspections 
made during the past year. In order to safeguard the con- 
sumer, all establishments handling foodstuffs are under con- 
stant supervision. Lunch cars and restaurants have been 
inspected weekly. 

Under the provisions of the General Laws of 1920 all 
bakeries are required to register with the board of health. 
The law provides that all doors and windows shall be properly 
screened and that all food exposed for sale shall be kept 
covered. Careful inspections of all bakeries have been made 
to see that this law has been complied with. 

All the factories in the city have been inspected monthly. 

The Barber Shops are under very careful inspection 
and must be kept in a sanitary condition, and the barbers 
are required to keep themselves neat and clean and to properly 
sterilize their instruments. 

Number of Inspections 

Bakeries 534 Milk and Cream plants 103 

Barber shops 532 Pedlers and Wagons 

Billiard Halls and Bowl- and stock 2,061 

ing alleys 86 Public Halls 85 

Blacksmith's shops 5 Rendering plants 87 

Candy and Ice Cream School houses 9 

plants 182 Slaughter houses 281 

Factories 160 Stores and markets 4,163 

Fish Markets 677 Stables . 109 

Hen houses and yards.... 122 Theatres 90 

Lunch rooms and cars.. 1,376 Vacant lots and dumps 61 

Yards and cellers 258 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 157 

Articles Condemned 



The following is a list of articles condemned : 



Fish 



Cod fish (salt) 7 box. 

Haddock 284 lbs. 

Halibut 26 lbs. 

Mackerel 67 lbs. 

Salmon 7 lbs. 

Salmon 12 can. 



Fruit 

Apples 2 box. 

Apples 3 bus. 

Bananas 14 doz. 

Blackberries 14 qts. 

Canteloupes 2y 2 cts. 

Grape Fruit 2 box. 

Oranges 1% box. 

Raspberries 47 pts. 

Strawberries 39 box. 

Strawberries 15 qts. 



Meats 

Beef (corned) 194 lbs. 

Beef (fresh) 451 lbs. 

Fowl 714 lbs. 

Goat meat 19 lbs. 

Lamb 148 lbs. 

Liver 26 lbs. 

Pork (fresh) 303 lbs. 

Salt pork trimmings 35 lbs. 

Sausages 326 lbs. 

Veal 149 lbs. 



Vegetables 

Beans (string) 19 qts. 

Beans (string) 1 box. 

Beans (green) 1 bas. 

Beans (green) 9 bus. 

Cabbage 1 bbl. 

Carrots 1 bus. 

Celery 1 box. 

Corn 8 bus. 

Greens 4 box. 



158 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Greens 4 bus. 

Lettuce 1 box. 

Lettuce 41 doz. 

Onions 1 bus. 

Potatoes (white) 2 bag. 

Potatoes (white) 900 lbs. 

Squash 1 bbl. 

Squash 100 lbs. 

Tomatoes 31 can. 

Turnips IY2 box. 

Turnips 100 lbs. 

Miscellaneous 

Bread 34 loaves 

Cake 3 box. 

Candy 191 lbs. 

Cereal 332 pkgs. 

Coffee 41 lbs. 

Condensed milk 20 can. 

Corn starch 2 pkgs. 

Crackers 30 lbs. 

Crackers 10 pkgs. 

Doughnuts y 2 doz. 

Eggs y 2 case 

Flour 5 lbs. 

Flour 100 bag. 

Flour 26 pkgs. 

Jello 12 pkgs. 

Preserves (canned) 18 gal. 

Nuts 50 lbs. 

Prunes 32 lbs. 

Pickles 6 bot. 

Raisins 12 pkgs. 

Salt 14 pkgs. 

Sugar 344 lbs. 

Tea 12 lbs. 

Zwieback 4 pkgs. 



Slaughter Houses 

During- the year weekly inspections have been made at 
all slaughtering establishments and these plants were never 
in a more sanitary condition than at present. 

The number of animals slaughtered during 1025 in this 
city was less than during 1924. 

Number of Animals Slaughtered in 1925 



Swine 688,546 

Sheep 283,815 

Calves 65,819 

Cattle 38,461 

Total 1,076,641 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



159 



Examination of Animals for Contagious Diseases 

During the last year the city was entirely free from 
•contagious diseases in animals. 

Animals Examined 

Quaran- 

Inspected tined Killed Released 

Horses 1,341 

Cows 2 

Goats 8 

Donkeys 2 

Cats 110 1 

Dogs 23 23 23 

Total 1,377 24 24 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles M. Berry, 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 



ICO 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR 

Chemical and Bacteriological Laboratory, 

City Hall, 

Somerville, Mass. 
To the Board of Health, 

Somerville, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith present my annual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1925. 

On the above date there were licensed to sell milk, 793 
stores and 56 dealers; and 176 stores were registered to sell 
oleomargarine ; an increase over the previous year of 70 stores 
selling milk and 45 dealers handling oleomargarine. 4 dealers 
who were distributing milk either discontinued business or 
ownership was transferred. 

Of the 56 dealers handling milk and cream, 26 were 
located in Somerville and 30 were located in neighboring 
cities. 46 were pasteurizing according to the General Laws. 
10 dealers sold cream exclusively, 2 were wholesalers, and 4 
small producers sold milk from T. B. tested cows. There 
were approximately 37,000 quarts of milk and 1,900 quarts 
of cream distributed in Somerville daily. 

The following tables 1, 2, 3, and 4 are a summary of the 
work of the department for the year. 

Table 1. 

Receipts 



Months. 


License 
Applications 


01 

co • 
rt CO 


"3 

V . 

'ZL co 

a 

< 


Cash Paid 
City Treas. 


*3 

CD 3 

So 

eg o 

Z< 
<C 

o 


Total 

Income for 

Dept. 


January 


25 

31 

25 

36 

548 

196 

56 

25 

26 

221 

20 

21 


12.50 
15.50 
12.50 
18.00 
274.00 
98.00 
28.00 
12.50 
13.00 
10.50 
10.00 
10.50 








2.50 

1.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

1.50 








12.50 
15.50 
12.50 
20.50 
275.50 
99.00 
28.50 
13.50 
14.50 
10.50 
10.00 
10.50 


154.50 
217.00 
204.00 
176.00 
208.00 
188.00 
183.00 
191.00 
205.00 
184.00 
183.50 
180.50 


167.00 


February 


232.50 


March 


216.50 


April 


196.50 


May 


483.50 


June 


287.00 


Julv 


211.50 


August 


204.50 


September 

October 

November 

December 


219.50 
194.50 
193.50 
191.00 


Total 


1030 


515.00 


8.00 


523.00 


2274.50 


2797.50 







HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



161 



Table 2 



Samples of Milk, Cream, Ice Cream and Vinegar Examined 



Months. 



January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October .... 
November 
December 

Total. 









oi 


1=1 




iemic 
ample 
Dllecte 


Bact. 

ample 

llectio 


w 




TO SZ 
O <u 


■as 

83 -2 


o M o 


CO O 




0) 


o 

O 


CO 3 
CO 


102 


66 


15 





183 


319 


75 


44 


12 





131 


434 


224 


64 


17 





305 


405 


200 


47 


47 





294 


352 


293 


17 


17 





327 


408 


284 


39 


42 


32 


397 


372 


372 


76 


54 


12 


514 


363 


252 


106 


60 


16 


434 


377 


305 


78 


62 


23 


468 


396 


260 


47 


46 


9 


362 


360 


259 


70 


59 


11 


399 


367 


215 


72 


72 


8 


367 


361 


2841 


726 


503 


111 


4181 


4514 



eg 

™ a a 

ogo 
W 



502 

565 
710 
646 
735 

769 

877 
811 
864 
722 
766 
728 

8695 



Table 3 
Legal Notices 



Months. 


Chemical 


*3 
o 

§1 
pq o 

J-c 

e 


o3 

'3 

e3 

CO 


U 

oS 

(H 

<D 
A 

a 

H 


"3 

+3 

o 
H 


January 


1 

2 

1 

14 

5 

28 

30 

4 

3 

1 

4 

1 


6 

3 

5 

4 

8 

29 

59 

22 

28 

19 

13 

33 


1 

2 

2 

8 

11 

2 

2 



6 

12 

11 

5 








8 
41 
15 
6 





8 


February 


7 


March 


8 


April 


26 


May 


24 


June 


67 


July 


132 


August 


41 


September 

October 


43 
32 


November 

December 


28 
39 


Total 


94 


229 


62 


70 


455 







162 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Months. 



Table 4. 
Inspections 



January.... 
February . . 
March ..... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October ... 
Movember 
December 

Total.. 



M 


CO 

3*3 


h3 


■"*< <M 


TO 


en 


.2 oj 






P 


■11 (h 




73 2 


« o 

£3 


47 


8 


3 


63 


8 


71 


20 


25 


2 


3 


46 


3 


49 


3 


28 


3 


4 


35 


4 


39 


15 


36 


4 


5 


5 


2 


7 


7 


62 


2 


2 


3 


4 


7 


17 


38 


11 


2 


22 


11 


33 


5 


30 


3 


37 


23 


13 


36 


161 


35 


2 


3 


4 


64 


68 


32 


60 


2 


6 


25 


21 


46 


1 


21 


3 


42 


9 


r 15 


24 


15 


60 


. 2 


3 


2 


7 


9 


23 


67 


5 


7 


10 


10 


20 


26 


509 


47 


117 


247 


162 


409 


325 



'-.2 

O O) 

H ft 



220 
131 
128 
66 
97 
122 
303 
208 
161 
129 
106 
145 



1816 



In April 1925 Georgia H. Moreland was Appointed tech- 
nician in the Board of Health Laboratory and Francis W. 
Small was appointed a Collector of Samples (part time). 
.Both took up their duties May 1, 1925. 

During 1925 license fees and fees for analyses amounted 
to |2797.50 an increase over the previous year of |127.50. 
There were in 1925, 8G95 laboratory examinations of milk 
and milk products, an increase over 1924 of 1260 samples ex- 
amined. There were 35G6 miscroscopical examinations of milk 
specimens by the Slack Method. 

There were during 1925, 4 dealers prosecuted for selling 
milk of inferior quality and all paid their fines amounting 
to $125.00. 



Income for Department 

Fees for issuing milk licenses $515.00 

Fees for analyses 2,282.50 

Fines paid in Lower Court 125.00 

Total $2,922.50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 1.63 

Each month during the year pint samples have been 
taken from every milk dealer and analyzed for food value 
(fats and solids) and cleanliness, (bacterial count and 
sediment). 

The higher the fat and solids the greater the food value. 
The lower the bacterial count, the greater care of production, 
better handling, or more efficient pasteurization is shown. 

By calling the office of the milk inspector these figures 
will be cheerfully quoted. 

Recommendations 

1. There should be provided a suitable method of medical 
supervision of employees in milk plants. 

2. A regulation should be formulated requiring auto- 
matic thermostat control of all pasteurizing machines. 

3. Some sort of registration should be required for all 
operators of pasteurization machines. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herbert E. Bowman, 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



164 ANNUAL REPORTS 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Thomas M. Durell, M. D., President, 1928 
J. Feank Wellington, Vice-President, 1926 
William L. Barber, 1928 Frank M. Barnard, 1926 

Herbert E. Buffum, M. D., 1926 Albert L. Haskell, 1928 
Giles W. Bryant, M. D., 1927, Leon M. Conwell, 1927, resigned 

(deceased) William J. Ennis, 1927 
William H. Dolben, 1927 George E. Whitaker, 1927 



COMMITTEES 



On Administration 
The President, Messrs. Wellington, Conwell, Buffum, and Haskell. 

On Books and Cataloguing 
The President, Messrs. Barber, Bryant, Barnard, and Whitaker. 

On Buildings and Property 
The President and the Vice-President 



Secretary of the Board 
George H. Evans 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 165 

ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY AND STAFF PERSONNEL 

December 31, 1925 

George H. Evans, Librarian 

Nellie M. Whipple, Assistant Librarian 

Vivian J. Morse, Executive Assistant 



CENTRAL LIBRARY AND LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE 

Highland Avenue and Walnut Street 

GRADED SERVICE 

Department Heads and Special Positions 

Cora B. Eames, Reference Librarian and Second Assistant 

Mabel E. Bunker, Chief Cataloguer 

Mary S. Woodman, Reviewer and Classifier 

Mildred A. Bowley, Supervisor of Periodicals and Binding. 

School Librarian 

Myrtle Nicholson, Desk Chief 

Helen W. Farrar, Assistant Cataloguer 

Supervisor of Children's Work 

Reference Assistant 

Alice W. Hamilton, Children's Librarian 

Senior Assistants 

Evelyn J. Emery, Circulation 
Miriam G. Howard, School Deposits 
Catalogue Department 

Junior Assistants 

Irene Smith, Circulation 

Hilda 0. Eastman, Children's Room 



Ungraded Service 



Margaret M. Collins, Page 
Unetta Quinn, Page 
Edythe T. Reynolds, Page 



Attendants on Part Time 

Marston C. Sargent Philip L. Rusden 

Basil R. Mills 



161) \ ANNUAL REPORTS 

WEST SOMERVILLE BRANCH 

Established 1909 
40 College Avenue 

Graded Service 
Esther M. Mayhew, Branch Librarian 
Dorothy H. Terry, First Assistant 
Katherine I. Eaton, Children's Librarian 

Senior Assistants 

Dorothy C. Emerson, Circulation 
Ethel B. Lewis, Circulation 

Junior Assistant 
Frances Brown, Circulation 

UNGRADED SERVICE 
Attendants on Part Time 

Fred L. Reed Frances Mendell 

Dolphie E. Berg Ruth Jackson 

James J. Carney 



EAST SOMERVILLE BRANCH 

Established 1912 

Broadway and Illinois Avenue 

Graded Service 

Desier C. Moulton, Branch Librarian 

Ruth M. Woodman, First Assistant 

E. Marion Akerley, Children's Librarian 

Senior Assistant 
Florence A. Bolster, Circulation 

UNGRADED SERVICE 
Attendants on Part Time 
Gertrude McGlinchy Philomena Lombardi 

Edna Thompson Dorothy Rolston 

Isabel Cheney 



UNION SQUARE BRANCH 
Established 1912 
Washington Street and Bonner Avenue 

Graded Service 
Alice G. Worthen, Branch Librarian 
Irma P. Traphagen, First Assistant 
Elsie L. Knox, Children's Librarian 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 167 

Junior Assistant 
Helen Hosmer, Circulation 

UNGRADED SERVICE 

Attendants on Part Time 

Dorothy W. Crosby Mildred C. Perkins 

Nona Kelley . James Zissis 

John Knox M. Abbie Hall 



MEMBERS OF THE TRAINING CLASS 

Beatrice M. Kenny Alice J. Underwood 

Barbara Klingenhagen Eleanor Binford 

Estelle M. Jones Marion H. Hanford 

NOTE: — For changes in staff personnel during year see Librarian'^ 
Report. 



168 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Report of the Trustees 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville: 

Gentlemen: The fifty-third annual report of the trus- 
tees of the public library is herewith respectfully submitted; 
being the report of the librarian and tables of statistics of 
operation. 

Very respectfully. 

The Board of Trustees, by 

Thomas M. Durell, 

President. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 169 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

The fifty-third annual report of the Somerville Public 
Library, being that for the year 1925, is herewith submitted. 

It is fitting that we should chronicle with profound re- 
gret the loss of two members of the Board during the year. 
Dr. Giles W. Bryant died unexpectedly on November 8. He 
had served continuously since his appointment in 1915, with 
an almost unbroken record of attendance. An appropriate 
expression of appreciation of his services has been adopted 
for the records of the Trustees. William H. Dolben, a former 
trustee, was appointed November 25 to fill out the unexpired 
term. The resignation of Leon M. Conwell was received in 
December. Mr. Conwell was appointed to the Board in 1923 
to succeed Frederick W. Parker, deceased. The regret of 
the Board at Mr. Conwell's departure will be mitigated by 
the mandate of the citizens of Somerville drafting him for 
service as the chief executive of the city. He was succeeded 
by William J. Ennis, appointed December 31 to fill out the un- 
expired term. 

A perusal of the statistics of operation for the year 
1925 does not reveal any feature of unusual significance, ex- 
cept the book problem at Union Square branch to which more 
extended reference will be made. We should be derelict 
in our duty if we failed to call attention again to the mark- 
ed discrepancy between the advancing cost of books and the 
amount of money allowed by our appropriation for book pur- 
chase. During the period since the outbreak of the W T orld 
War the cost of books has advanced fifty-five per cent., as 
compared with an increase in our book funds of sixteen per 
cent. We have been recently notified that additional ad- 
vances in the price of books may be expected immediately 
after the beginning of the new year. In the same period 
our population has increased from 86,000 to 100,000. What- 
ever may be the demands for economy in the administration 
of municipal affairs it certainly is worthy of our very serious 
consideration whether a restriction of the facilities devoted 
to education and to the training of youth in citizenship can 
ever be justified on the grounds of economy. Wherever a 
survey or other estimate of the social condition of a municipal- 
ity is attempted one of the invariable indexes of community 
intelligence is the support and use of the public library. 



170 ANNUAL REPORTS 

We have had occasion frequently to allude to the pecu- 
liarly valuable work of the Union Square Branch in advanc- 
ing the interests of good citizenship among new Americans. 
Nothing could be a more vital factor in promoting the wel- 
fare of our city. We are pleased to record that during re- 
cent months there has appeared in this neighborhood a new 
spirit of appreciation and cooperation, and that there is evi- 
dent a greatly improved morale among the numerous juvenile 
visitors to this branch. 

The branch book collection has never been adequate, 
and one of the discouraging features of the work has been 
the almost constant necessity to send away children empty 
handed because of this lack. "Pitiful" is the word used by 
an observer. Due to long continued use and the passage of 
time a large proportion of the present collection of books has 
been read and re-read and has become badly worn, filthy 
from much handling, and in many cases superseded by more 
recent material. A decline of 9,952 in the circulation in 1925 
bears eloquent witness to the pressing need. During the same 
period the rest of the system gained 30,920. The problem 
is one that requires immediate attention. Your librarian, 
therefore, strongly urges that a request be made for a special 
appropriation of three thousand dollars outside of, and in 
addition to, the regular annual appropriation for the pur- 
chase of books, which of itself barely suffices to provide cur- 
rent publications. 

W r e desire to express our appreciation of the coopera- 
tion of the Department of Public Buildings in giving the 
Union Square building a thorough cleaning, and painting it 
inside and outside. 

Our city is especially fortunate in the possession of 
branch libraries so completely equipped and so efficiently 
.staffed. The policy of the trustees and librarian has been to 
make each of these buildings as far as possible a library in 
every respect complete for the service of its own community. 
The special features upon which this service is based are as 
follows : 

Eioht Points of a Somerville Branch 

(1) Independent, separate budget and appropriation 
making the branch entirely self-supporting; 

(2) Permanent, separate building entirely controlled 
by the trustees for library purposes only; 

(3) Permanent collection of books with separate ref- 
erence and children's collections ; 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 171 

(4) Separate children's room; 

(5) Staff and work rooms; 

(0) Separate and permanent staff, the standard min- 
imum force consisting of branch librarian, 1st as- 
sistant, children's librarian, one or more se- 
nior or junior assistants, and part time attendants 
as needed ; 

(7) Open every week day and evening at least seven 
hours ; 

(8) Daily express interchange service between all 
buildings. 

Inquiry will show that the foregoing are standards for 
cities of the first class. Even in the face of such an unfor- 
tunate calamity as the total destruction of the Central library 
by fire our branches would carry on complete and uninter- 
rupted service as usual. This would appear to be the ul- 
timate test. 

In this connection it may not be amiss to direct the at- 
tention of our citizens to the important work that the library 
carries on in conjunction with the public schools. The li- 
brary maintains a carefully selected collection of books, niim- 

•J «,. 7 

bering approximately nine thousand, for the purpose of pro- 
viding circulating school room deposits. During the year 
just ended there have been circulated from this collection, 
distributed in 22o deposits, 66,135 volumes in the homes of 
pupils. The return, as measured by the use of books per 
unit of expenditure, is the largest shown by an}^ department, 
of the library. The public school is the only agency where- 
by contact with the whole or approximately the whole juven- 
ile population can be secured. The fundamental purpose is 
not primarily to assist the schools, but to penetrate the home 
of the child, to demonstrate the delights and profits of reading 
to children who then if ever acquire the reading habit. For 
this reason the one condition to which the library does not 
make exception is that the school room deposit shall be used 
for home loans. We hope by this means to plant the seeds 
of a taste for reading and for the best in literature; to in- 
troduce books into homes not otherwise reached ; to reveal 
the permanent availability of the public library in after 
years as a workshop and continuation school, and a source 
for the materials of culture; to teach pupils how to use books 
as tools; to implant in their minds the idea, which shall per- 
sist in the later years of adult citizenship, that the public 
library is an institution which as a matter of course is to 



172 ANNUAL REPORTS 

be supported as a part of the educational establishment of 
the city; and finally to supplement the educational work of 
the schools by supplying collateral material for both pupil 
and teacher. During the course of the year the school li- 
brarian, with the cordial cooperation of the superintendent 
of schools and the executives serving under him, brings to 
the library in convenient groups under the leadership of teach- 
ers the entire upper class of the junior high schools. These 
pupils are instructed in the use of the library, its catalog, 
the arrangement of its books, and the use of the better 
known works of reference. This instruction is emphasized 
by practical examples, and tests. More than one thousand 
pupils are given this course, which is continued by further 
instruction when they enter the high school. Even those 
who complete their school work with the junior high acquire 
at least an elementary understanding of the use of the library 
and its contents, that will be a potential asset for after years. 

The year upon which we are now entering is one of 
especial significance in library history. In 1876 the famous 
survey by the United States Bureau of Education published 
its voluminous report upon the library situation in the 
United States. In the same year was founded the Library 
Journal, the first and perhaps still the leading organ of the 
profession. Most significant of all was the founding of the 
American Library Association. Probably no single factor 
in the library history of the last fifty years has been so in- 
fluential in determining the direction and progress of our 
work. This influence has been exerted through its large and 
active membership, its well-attended annual conventions, and 
especially its professional publications which have largely 
determined the standards of modern library practice. The 
semi-centennial year now at hand will be suitably observed 
by the A. L. A. with a special program of activities that will 
tend to give a still further stimulus to library service. In 
order to finance this work it will be necessary to raise a fund 
of |30,000 or more. Every library in the country is invited 
to make a contribution toward this fund ranging upward 
from a minimum of $25 from small libraries. Already some 
of the larger libraries have indicated their intention to give 
as much as flOOO. 

Two standards for determining a normal contribution 
have been suggested. First, that the library shall contri- 
bute one tenth of one per cent, of its annual appropriation. 
Second, that members of the staff shall contribute, as far 
as their circumstances permit, the amount of one day's pay 
each. The librarian is informed that a ruling has already been 



TUBL1C LIBRARY 



173 



made to the effect that this library can not legally contribute 
money from its appropriation for any purpose. Needless to 
say we desire to maintain a reputation as a progessiye li- 
brary. The second plan seems our only hope of securing a 
creditable sum, namely to give an opportunity for our staff 
to contribute upon the basis suggested, one day's pay each. 
Several have already indicated their intention of doing this. 
It will not be placed upon anybody as an obligation, but will 
be offered as an opportunity to participate in a national pro- 
fessional activity. 

An interesting and valuable piece of work that has been 
under way for a considerable period and is now approaching 
completion is the compilation of a textbook of professional 
and technical methods prevailing in this library under the 
title, Approved Library Methods of the Somerville Public Li- 
brary. This is a step by step description of all the numerous 
policies, rules, and processes involved in the control and 
management of our library system. It provides not only a 
complete method, but an approved authority to be followed 
by employees in the discharge of whatever duty or process 
is incumbent upon them. Every employee, either in an ex- 
ecutive or a special position, has been provided with such a 
portion of the entire textbook as applies to her particular 
work, and copies of the complete compilation are available 
for reference to all members of the staff. 

On March 10 the library received a gift of $400 from 
Miss Sarah L. Graves of New York City, formerly a resident 
of Somerville, "this gift being in grateful memory of her 
teacher and principal, Mr. Henry H. Babcock." "The in- 
come is to be devoted to the purchase of new books and pe- 
riodicals. It is Miss Graves' desire that the Library be en- 
abled thereby to make purchases in addition to and beyond 
that which it would ordinarily be able to make with its reg- 
ular appropriation, it being understood that the possession of 
this particular fund shall not be taken into consideration in 
the annual appropriation as made and that the amount there- 
of shall not be thereby diminished." 

The library has also received "a bequest of income from 
the remainder trust of $3000 under the will of Eclward C. 
Booth." This trust is to be administered by the Old Colony 
Trust Company from whom the income will be received when 
and as it shall become available. This income is not restrict- 
ed but may be used for general library purposes at the dis- 
cretion of the Trustees. 

Among the several economies and restrictions of library 
service consequent upon the reduced support and increased 



174 ANNUAL REPORTS 

costs resulting from the World War was the closing of the 
Central children's room in the evening. This threw a seri- 
ous additional burden upon the reference department, as it 
was necessary to take care of a considerable volume of work 
coming in from the junior high schools in the evening. Not 
only did this work interfere with the service to the adult 
users of the library, but it added an element of disturbance 
and crowding which reduced the attractiveness of the library 
to the older readers. It is, therefore, with much satisfac- 
tion that we now feel ourselves able with the beginning of 
1926 to resume the normal service in the children's room. Dur- 
ing the school year the Central children's room will be open 
daily from 2 until 9 p. m. and in addition on Saturday morn- 
ings. During the long summer vacation the hours will be 
from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

In October 1924, by instruction of the Board, the Li- 
brarian addressed a request to the Public Buildings Depart- 
ment for the replacement of chairs at the Central library, 
the number of which had been so depleted by the wear of the 
past ten years that the public seating capacity had been seri- 
ously reduced. Not having been able to secure these replace- 
ments the request was repeated on April 14 and on December 
10, 1925 by further instruction of the Board. 

For some time there has been a growing need at the 
Central library of additional protective shelving for the ac- 
commodation of books which by reason of value, or of certain 
special features, can not properly be placed on the open 
shelves. All the shelving provided for that purpose in the 
original plan of the building has been filled, and a rapidly 
increasing overflow must be accomodated. The librarian is, 
therefore, by authorization of the Board asking the Depart- 
ment of Public Buildings to enclose a small section of the 
stack for this purpose. 

It is hoped that both of these much needed improve- 
ments may be given attention at an early date. 

Changes of personnel in the staff during the year have 
been as follows : 

Appointments to the Graded service: Ruth M. Wood- 
man, 1st Assistant at East; Florence A. Bolster, Evelyn J. 
Emery, Angela Q. Marchese, and Ethel B. Lewis, Senior As- 
sistants ; Hilda (). Eastman, Irene Smith, Frances Brown and 
Helen L. Hosmer, Junior Assistants. 

Resignations from the Graded service : Katherine E. 
Hunt, Chief Cataloguer; Elsie K. Wells, Acting Branch Libra- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 < O 

rian at East ; Elsie Gr. Umpleby, Reference Assistant ; Marion 
J. Meserve, School Librarian; Edna L. Hartwell, Children's 
Librarian at East ; Maurene Chenoweth, Margaret Wentworth, 
Angela Q. Marchese, C. Evelyn Bamford, and Decima I. Doyle, 
Senior Assistants. 

Promotions in the Graded service in regular course 
under the provisions of the Scheme of Service : Mabel E. 
Bunker to Chief Cataloger; Desier C. Moulton to Branch Li- 
brarian at East ; Alice W. Hamilton to Children's Librarian 
at Central; Irma P. Traphagen to 1st Assistant at Union 
Square; E. Marion Akerley to Children's Librarian at East; 
Elsie L. Knox to Children's Librarian at LTnion Square; Elsie 
G. Umpleby to Reference Assistant ; Miriam G. Howard, 
Elsie G. Umpleby, Margaret Wentworth and C. Evelyn Bam- 
ford to Senior Assistants. 

Appointments to the Ungraded service ; Edythe T. Rey- 
nolds ; and in addition there were employed for temporary 
summer vacation work ; Anna C. Keating, Mary Goodhue, 
Basil R. Mills, and Marston C. Sargent. 

The annual library training class was selected from a 
list of about forty applicants. Of those whose applications 
were received in time, thirteen were deemed eligible to take 
the examination. Six pupils were desired for the training 
class, and exactly that number received a passing rank in 
their examinations. After the final rating was determined 
the sealed envelopes containing the names of the candidates 
were opened, and not until then were the successful ones 
known. Of these six, five were Somerville girls. 

The appended statistics of operation for the year 1925 
are submitted as a part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Evans, 

Librarian. 



176 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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rUBLIC LIBRARY 



177 



APPENDIX B 

American Library Association Form for Uniform Statistics ; 

Annual report for year ended December 31, 1925 

Name of library: The Public Library of the City of Somerville, Mass. 
City: Somerville State: Massachusetts 

Name of Librarian: George Hill Evans 

Date of founding 1872 

Population served (latest estimate) 100,000 

Assessed valuation of city $104,769,800 00 

Rate of tax levy for library purposes: .68 of a mill 
Terms of use: Free for lending 

Free for reference 
Total number of agencies 229 

Consisting of Central Library 1 

Branches 3 

High School Department 1 

School Rooms 222 

Institutions 2 

Number of days open during year (Central Library) 303 

Hours open each week for lending (Central Library) 72 

Hours open each week for reading (Central Library) 72 



INCREASE 

Number of volumes at beginning of year 

Number of volumes added during year by purchase 

Number of volumes added during year by gift or ex- 
change 

Number of volumes added during year by binding ma- 
terial not otherwise counted 

Number of volumes added during year by lost books 
restored 

Number of volumes lost or withdrawn during year .... 

Total number at end of year 



117,123 
7,816 

13& 

104 

51 

5,254 

119,979 



USE 



Number of volumes of fic- 
tion lent for home use 

Total number of volumes 
lent for home use 

Number of pictures, photo- 
graphs and prints lent 
for home use 



Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


204,161 


111,184 


315,345 


272,210 


188,815 


461,025 



3,224 



REGISTRATION 



Number of borrowers reg- 
istered during year .... 

Total number of regis- 
tered borrowers 

Registration period, years 



Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


4,697 


3,753 


8,450 


9,233 


7,735 


16,968 
2 



178 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Number of periodicals and newspapers currently re- 
ceived : 

Titles 247 

Copies 565 

Number of publications issued during year: 

Bulletins , 8 

Other 

Number of staff, library service 42 

Number of staff, janitor service 6 

FINANCE 

Beceipts from: 

Local taxation: 

Library Department $52,284 62 

Public Buildings Department 14,220 79 

Invested funds 829 79 

Fines 2,406 84 

Other sources (dog licenses) 2,383 54 



Total 72,124 79 

Unexpended balance from previous year 

(invested funds) 351 16 

Grand Total $72,475 95 

Payments for : 

Library Operating Expenses: 

Librarians' Salaries $39,885 20 

Books 

Periodicals 

Binding 

Supplies, stationery, printing, etc 

Furniture, equipment, etc 

Telephone, postage, freight, ex 

press 

Other items 

Total 

Building Maintenance Expenses: 

Janitors, mechanics, wages, etc $7,956 45 

Cleaning supplies and equipment 

Building repairs and minor alterations 

Rent 

Heat and light 

Other items 

Total 

Total Maintenance Expenses 

Balance from Appropriation, Library Dept. 

Balance from Invested Funds 

Balance from Appropriation, Public Build- 
ings Department 



10,101 11 




1,334 89 




2,366 82 




1,950 84 




00 




1,654 62 




389 40 






$57,682 88 



239 


53 






1,033 


85 






000 


00 






3,685 


43 






812 


37 










$13,727 


63 










$71,410 


51 


$2 


09 






570 


98 






492 
culation 


37 


$o.: 


133 



Maintenance expenditure per capita $0,714 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 170 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



School Committee Rooms, December 28, 1925. 

Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent of 
Schools be adopted as the annual report of the Board of 
School Committee, it being understood that such adoption 
does not commit the Board to the opinions or recommenda- 
tions made therein ; that it be incorporated in the reports 
of the City Officers; and that 1,000 copies be printed separate- 

iy 

Charles S. Clark, 

Secretary of School Board. 



180 ANNUAL REPORTS 

School Committee, 1925 

Harry M. Stoodley Chairman 

John J. Hayes . . Vice-Chairman 

Members 

EX-OFFICIIS 

John M. Webster, Mayor 76 Boston street 

John S. Smith, Jr., President Board of Aldermen, 52 Sydney street 

WARD ONE 

John J. Hayes, 10 Wisconsin avenue 

Francis J. Fitzpatrick, 2 Austin street 

WARD TWO 

Christopher J. Muldoon, 88 Concord avenue 

Daniel H. Bradley, 19 Concord avenue 

WARD THREE 

Charles W. Boyer, 66 Avon street 

Oscar W. Codding, 59 Vinal avenue 

WARD FOUR 

Walter E. Whittaker, 135 Walnut street 

Katherine C. Coveney, 73 Marshall street 

WARD FIVE 

Harry M. Stoodley, 283 Highland avenue 

Minnie S. Turner, 64 Hudson street 

ward six 

Walter Frye Turner, 15 Highland road 

Walter I. Chapman, 18-A Central street 

WARD SEVEN 

Edwin A. Shaw, 63 College avenue 

Herbert Cholerton, .94 College avenue 

Superintendent of Schools 
Charles S. Clark 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days, 
and 8.30 on Saturdays. 

Superintendent's Office Force 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 
Marion E. Marshall, 30 Gilman street. 
Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln Place. 
Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Highland avenue. 
S. Regina Truelson, 38 Rogers avenue. 
Bernice F. Parker, 11 Dickson street. 

Board Meetings 

January 5 March 30 June 29 November 30 

January 26 April 27 September 28 December 28 

February 16 May 25 October 26 

8.15 o'clock 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 181 

Standing Committees, 1925 
Note. — The member first named is chairman, 
District I. — Hayes, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT 

District II. — Muldoon, Bradley, Fitzpatrick. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER 

District III. — Boyer, Codding, Bradley. 

POPE, CUMMINGS 

District IV. — Whittaker, Coveney, Boyer. 

EDGERLY, GLINES 

District V. — Stoodley, Miss Turner, Whittaker. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM 

District VI. — Turner, Chapman, Stoodley. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN 

District VII. — Shaw, Cholerton, Turner. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE 

High Schools. — Shaw. Bradley, Hayes, Codding, Whittaker, Stoodley, 
Chapman. 

School Accommodations. — Hayes, Boyer, Bradley, Coveney, Miss Turn- 
er, Turner, Cholerton, Mayor Webster, President Smith. 

Teachers. — Cholerton, Miss Turner, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Codding, 
Whittaker, Chapman. 

Finance. — Codding, Stoodley, Fitzpatrick, Bradley, Whittaker, Turner, 
Cholerton, Mayor Webster, President Smith. 

Text Books and Courses of Study. — Chapman, Muldoon, Hayes, Cod- 
ding, Coveney, Miss Turner, Shaw. 

Industrial Education. — Boyer, Turner, Hayes, Muldoon, Coveney, Miss 
Turner, Shaw. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics. — Fitzpatrick, Whittaker, 
Bradley, Boyer, Stoodley, Chapman. Cholerton, 

Rules and Regulations. — Muldoon, Coveney, Fitzpatrick, Boyer, Stood- 
ley, Turner, Shaw. 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



TO THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 

Herewith I submit the report of the conditions of the 
schools for the year now closing which, under the practice of 
your Board, the Superintendent is required to make each year. 
As this report serves the purpose of a report of the School 
Committee as well as of the Superintendent of Schools, I 
have provided the usual statistical information so that cit- 
izens may be informed fully about the operation of the schools. 



MEMBERSHIP 

The total number of pupils in the membership of the 
schools in December, exclusive of the Continuation Schools, 
was 15,203. This is an increase of 350 pupils over the mem- 
bership of last year and is a larger gain than was made dur- 
ing that year. The membership in the elementary schools, in- 
cluding kindergartens, is 363 pupils larger than last year 
but there has been a small falling oft in the membership of 
the high and junior high schools, a loss of 20 in the high school 
and 11 in the junior high schools. There was a gain of 15 
in the membership for the Vocational School for Boys. 
These changes in membership of pupils have been too small 
to make any material effect upon school conditions. 

ACCOMMODATIONS 

Every child attending the elementary schools in Som- 
erville is provided a seat and a full-day schooling. This 
should be a cause for gratification to the parents of our chil- 
dren. While some of our school buildings are old they are, 
in the main, pleasant places for our children and are well 
provided with furniture and other classroom furnishings. 
In one respect, however, immediate improvement should be 
made. There are rooms which are too dark on cloudy or 
stormy days. Such a condition can work a great injury to 
the eyesight of pupils. A sufficient provision of artificial 
lighting should be made so that these schools can be made 
light enough for the children to do their work in safety on 
the darkest of days. While there have been seats enough 
for all the pupils this year, attention should be given to the 
likelihood that in the near future additional school facilities 
will be needed in the northwestern part of the city and in the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 188 

eastern part of the city. The rapid growth in the popula- 
tion of the former and the prospect of new homes being con- 
structed upon the Ten Hills Farm Property indicate that 
additional school accommodations will soon be needed for those 
sections of the city. 

The building situation of the high school continues un- 
satisfactory. During the year, the Public Property Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen, after carefully examining 
the high school building, came to the conclusion that a sub- 
stantial addition should be made to it but as the year closes 
no definite action has been taken to start such a work. It 
is necessary, therefore, for me to call attention again to this 
need. The work of the school is seriously hindered by lack 
of sufficient room. At the present time, every room is oc- 
cupied so constantly that the only opportunity that now 
remains for increasing undertakings or for the accommodation 
of additional pupils is to use rooms for such work during 
the afternoon. The school must undertake certain additional 
activities in the near future even though to do so it becomes 
necessary to resort to afternoon classes. This undesirable 
expedient, however, will not satisfactorily meet the needs of 
the school for the reason, among others, that it is unwise to 
make interior alterations such as would be demanded to provide 
suitably for new activities until it is definitely known whether 
any alterations will be made to the present building. Neigh- 
boring communities have been confronted with the problem 
of providing suitable accommodations for high school pupils 
and many new and expensive high school buildings have, as 
a consequence, been erected in this region during recent years. 
Wherever such new and modern buildings have been provided, 
the community has evinced pride in the accomplishment 
and has called attention of neighboring towns and cities to 
its new high school building as a monument to civic devotion 
and enterprise. Our high school is the city's chief contribu- 
tion to the development of the youth of secondary school age. 
If this contribution is insufficient the youth must bear the 
loss. Therefore, it is important that suitable enlargement 
of the high school be undertaken in the near future. 

COST 

What do the public schools cost the people of this city? 
What part of the revenue of the city is this cost? How does 
the conduct of the schools compare with other communities 
of the State in cost and in efficiency? Do the schools cost too 
much? What are the chief elements of the cost of the schools? 
While these questions are pertinent at any time they are 



184 ANNUAL REPORTS 

especially so now as another financial year closes. There 
is prevalent everywhere a tendency to criticise the cost of 
government and to include the cost of education in such crit- 
icism. According to this criticism, the conduct of the schools 
requires too much money to be raised for its support by public 
taxation. A good deal has been said in public and private 
discussion to the effect that education has too ambitious a 
program, covers too much ground, and attempts too much 
for children. The remedy for this condition is never clearly 
stated by the proponents of this view. Beyond a general 
clamor for reduction in cost of education, there is little 
discussion of the means by which an educational program 
adequate for the needs of the community can be carried on 
with any substantial reduction of cost. In the meantime, 
various influences are at work whose inevitable and sure 
tendency is to increase the cost of education. The first of 
these is the demand of the parents that their children shall 
have as good educational opportunities as are given to the 
children of other communities. There is no mistaking the 
existence of this sentiment. Parents in every community 
demand that their high school shall provide as good train- 
ing for their pupils as is given by high schools of other 
communities. They demand that the children below the high 
school shall have good teaching, adequate provision of books 
and supplies, and that they shall be given the varying experi- 
ences wich today are deemed essential to the proper develop- 
ment of youth through the agency of public schools. The 
second influence is the increasing cost of everything that comes 
from the market of the world, including the cost of personal 
service. The third element is the effect of increasing scientific 
knowledge concerning the human mind. This element shows 
its influence in the demand for variations in provisions for 
the training of pupils to meet variations of need which in- 
creased professional knowledge discloses. So important are 
some of these variations that the legislature has, by law, com- 
pelled communities to make them. . Instances of such varia- 
tions are vocational education, continuation school, provision 
for special instruction for retarded pupils, physical training, 
manual training, household arts, Civics, United States His- 
tory, etc. Lest the communities under the impulse of saving 
money at the expense of education should fail to provide 
these elements of education, the State has made them all com- 
pulsory by legal enactment. These, then, are general con- 
ditions affecting the cost of education which bear upon all 
communities and which are so much a part of the undertak- 
ing as to be beyond the power of a community to control 
materially. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 185 

Turning now to an examination of the cost of the schools 
of Somerville, we find that the total cost for the mainten- 
ance of schools for year ending June 30, 1925 was $964,261.00. 
This is $30,489.27 more than was spent for the same purpose 
in 1924. This sum includes the amounts spent for the care 
of school buildings, including janitors' services, fuel, light, 
school telephones, and the salaries of officers, the amount 
spent for school supplies, and the sum paid for salaries of 
teachers. The first step in discovering whether this large 
sum is a disproportionate expenditure for education is to find 
out what part of the city's revenue is devoted to that pur- 
pose. The City Auditor has made a functional division of 
each dollar of expenditure from revenue for 1924 which shows 
that 26.4% has been expended for education. Of this amount, 
21.8% was controlled by the School Committee. In addition 
to the 26.4 % expended for education, the City Auditor reports 
that 5% of the revenue has been expended for debt and in- 
terest upon loans for school building construction, making 
a total of 31.4% of the dollar of revenue expended upon edu- 
cation. 

While it is evident that this is the largest fractional 
part of the dollar of expenditure from revenue devoted to 
any one purpose, it is equally evident that the business of 
the schools is the largest single enterprise in which the city 
is engaged. It is not, therefore, a significant statement to 
say that education takes the largest fraction in which this 
dollar is divided. The real question is : "Is the fraction of 
each dollar of expenditure from revenue devoted to educa- 
tion too large?" Some help in the answering of this question 
can be gained from a comparison with the corresponding 
facts taken from the experience of other cities. The best 
evidence available on this matter is found in "Financial 
Statistics of Cities", published by the United States Depart- 
ment of Commerce in the year 1923. On page 40 is a com- 
parative summary of percent distribution in departmental 
expenses of 146 cities, giving the average expenditure in each 
department for a period of years to 1923. This table gives 
37.8% as the average for expenditures for schools for 1923. 
In this average for schools, however, are not included two 
items which are included in the Somerville table and which 
increase, therefore, the Somerville percentage. These items 
are Debt and Interest. While, therefore, it is not possible 
to make a comparison between exactly identical facts for 
Somerville and the average of the 146 cities quoted in Fi- 
nancial Statistics of Cities, there is usefulness in the com- 
parison of the two tables as they stand. It is evident that 
the average proportion of expenditure for education in the 



186 ANNUAL REPORTS 

146 cities quoted in this report is considerably larger than 
the proportion devoted to the schools of Somerville. Such 
is the answer to the question "Is too large a part of the rev- 
enue of the city given to education?" But the question arises 
"Is this expenditure too large for the number of pupils edu- 
cated?" The way to find the answer to this question is by 
comparing the pupil cost of education in Somerville with that 
in other cities. The report of the Massachusetts Department 
of Education furnishes a basis for such comparison with the 
other communities of the State. According to this report, 
the per capita cost of the schools of our city for the school 
year ending June 30, 1925 was $65.71, one cent less than last 
year. Of the 39 cities in Massachusetts 34 had a higher per 
capita, the highest being $121.20. Only four of the cities 
of Massachusetts had a lower per capita expenditure than 
Somerville. From this examination of the facts taken from 
local, State, and National authoritative financial statistics, 
the answer to the questions already propounded is that the 
fractional part of each dollar of expenditure from revenue 
in 1924 devoted to the schools of Somerville is smaller than 
the average of 146 cities of the country and that the per capita 
cost of the schools of Somerville for the school year ending 
June 30, 1925, was lower than that expended in 34 of the 39 
cities of the State. 

ORGANIZATION 

After considering the cost of the educational program 
of the City, it is to the point to examine the organization of 
the school enterprise to see in what way this affects the 
answers to the questions about cost. Our schools have 12 
grades divided on the 6-3-3-plan, 6 grades of elementary 
schools, 3 grades of junior high schools, and 3 grades of senior 
high school. There are 9 kindergarten classes. There is a 
Vocational School for Boys and a Continuation School. The 
special enterprises of the schools are classes for retarded 
children, a Sight Saving Class, and a Dental Dispensary. In 
the evening organization there is a high school, two elemen- 
tary schools, practical and household arts classes for women, 
and Americanization classes. The organization of the day 
schools is in accordance with the advanced and growing tend- 
ency of the time. The special undertakings are limited in 
number and are of the general nature fostered or compelled by 
state legislation. Adequate provision for the needs of the 
pupils will necessitate additional special classes. In admin- 
istering the program of studies, the cost of such an educational 
program is in part determined by the number of teachers and 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 187 

supervising officers, the salaries paid to them, and the amount 
spent for supplies and equipment. Comparison between ex- 
penditures of Somerville and the expenditures of the other 
cities of the State shows that we are extremely economical 
in these particulars, there being only four cities of the State 
with a lower per capita expenditure for the maintenance of 
schools for the last school year. The conclusion is, there- 
fore, that while the cost of education in Somerville does take 
one third of the revenue of the city, this expenditure is within 
five of being the smallest per capita expenditure among the 
cities of the State. 

Some changes in the organization and in the provision 
of classes were made at the opening of schools in September. 
A new kindergarten was opened in the Perry School and an- 
other in the Highland School, while owing to a change in 
the plan of conducting kindergartens additional classes were 
formed in six other kindergartens. In pursuance of a general 
plan to relieve overcrowding in certain classes, it was decided 
to use additional rooms in the Edgerly and Forster School 
buildings. Consequently the atypical class at the Knapp 
School was tranferred to the Edgerly School and the room 
so vacated was used for an elementary class. Two new classes 
were opened in the Forster School, thereby giving relief to 
certain grades in the eastern part of the city. 

TEACHERS 

Thirty-two teachers have dropped out of the service 
during the present year, about 7% of the total number. Of 
this loss two were by death, four by retirement, and the rest 
by resignation. Of the resignations, eight women teachers 
resigned to be married and four for professional advance- 
ment. During the same time thirty-four persons were elected 
to positions as teachers. Of this number seventeen were train- 
ed in the schools of Somerville and seventeen were drawn from 
other places. Nine of these newly elected teachers were 
college graduates, 19 were graduates of State Normal Schools, 
,and three of private schools. Thirteen had only one year's 
teaching experience while twelve had more than five. All of 
the thirteen elected after only one year's teaching experi- 
ence, were Somerville girls. The training that the latter 
have received during the one year since their graduation 
from college or normal schools has been obtained in our 
schools under the supervision of masters, principals, and other 
supervisory officers. These young teachers necessarily lack 
some of the qualities of older teachers. They are, however, 
first-rate material out of which to make sucessful teachers. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



It is the problem of the School organization to afford them 
such assistance and supervision as will insure their growth 
in professional understanding and in teaching skill. 



PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT 

In the last report a full explanation was given of the 
plan adopted by the School Committee to encourage the pro- 
fessional improvement of teachers in service by giving ad- 
ditional pay to teachers who will pursue approved courses of 
study. It is pertinent to report how that plan has carried 
on during the present year. Of the' 449 teachers, 354 are now 
pursuing some course of professional study approved by the 
Superintendent of Schools or have taken such a course during 
the present calendar year. Only 95 teachers have taken no 
part in this plan since its inception. At this time last year 
there were 124 teachers who had taken no courses. The range 
of studies pursued by the teachers has been wide and the 
means of instruction have been varied. Again this year the 
School Committee established several courses to be given in 
Somerville. Among these are the following: 

Voice Placement and Reading, 2 classes (Pts. I and II), 
Harriet M. Bell, teacher in the Somerville High School. 

Health Education, Mabel C. Bragg, Assistant Super- 
intendent of Schools, Newton. 

Classroom Teachers' Problems of Administration, 2 
classes, James A. Crowley, Master, John Winthrop District, 
Boston. 

Educational Psychology, 2 classes, Francis A. Ryan, 
Supervising Principal, Knapp, Baxter, and Perry Schools, 
Somerville. 

The total amount paid to teachers this year as increases 
earned under this Plan is $10, 524.37. The number of teachers 
receiving from $50 to $300 as a result of this plan is 248; 46 
of these have received two increments. 



KINDERGARTENS 

For a number of years our kindergarten classes have 
been conducted on the plan of a session in the morning and 
only one class in a room. These classes have accommodated 
50 pupils under the care of a teacher and an assistant. On 
June last there were 7 classes having a membership of 314 
pupils. For a number of years there have been requests for 
additional kindergartens in various parts of the city. Lack 
of vacant rooms available for this purpose has prevented 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 189 

i 

the establishment of such classes in certain localities. To 
extend more widely the benefits of the kindergarten without 
greatly increasing the cost, the School Committee at its 
April meeting voted to change the plan of conducting kin- 
dergartens and set forth the details of the change in the fol- 
lowing order: 

That the kindergartens of the school system be reor- 
ganized beginning September 1, 1925, upon the following 
plan : — 

1. That kindergarten teachers be put on a full-day 
teaching program of two sessions. 

2. That the kindergarten classes shall continue in a 
halfday program, but that the number of children taught 
during the day by a kindergarten teacher, without an assis- 
tant, shall not exceed 50, the limitation that is at present 
put upon the size of the first grade classes. 

3. That kindergarten classes be conducted on either 
of two plans, (a) a group not exceeding 25 in charge of a 
kindergarten teacher without an assistant; or (b) a group 
not less than 30, nor more than 50, in charge of a kindergarten 
teacher with an assistant. 

4. That a group of kindergarten children, not exceed- 
ing 25, shall be taught by a person with the rank of teacher, 
and having the salary rating of kindergarten teacher. 

5. That the salary rating of a kindergarten teacher 
be the same as that of an elementary school teacher, with 
a maximum of $1,500 ; that kindergarten teachers be placed 
in this salary schedule beginning September 1, 1925, in ac- 
cordance with their years of service, and that the maximum 
pay of assistants working a two session day be increased $100. 

G. That elected kindergarten teachers and assistants 
now teaching in the kindergartens of the city be employed 
next September in accordance with this plan and that new 
classes for kindergarten instruction be organized to the extent 
of the resources made available by the adoption of this plan. 

The outstanding points of this change are the following: 
Kindergarten teachers, like teachers of other grades, now 
teach a whole day and are paid on the same basis as elemen- 
tary teachers. Kindergarten rooms are used in the morning 
and in the afternoon, a different set of pupils attending each 
session. A larger number of children secure the advantages 
of kindergarten training from the same resources. Under 
the present arrangement where two classes occupy one room, 



190 ANNUAL REPORTS 

one half of the pupils attend in the morning from 9 to 12 
and the other half attend in the afternoon from 1 :30 to 3 :30. 
This arrangement will continue until midyear when the classes 
will change sessions. 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

The attendance at the Vocational School for Boys has 
been somewhat larger than a year ago. As the year closes 
the membership of the school is over 100. During the fall the 
master of the school has urged the establishment of a class 
in electricity and one in carpentry, having a number of boys 
in the school now who want such courses and being convinced 
that others would come into the school were such classes 
established. Meanwhile there is a request pending from the 
Master Painters' Association for the opening of a class in 
house and interior painting. Attention should be given to 
these proposals very soon. The Department of Education 
which shares with the School Board the direction and expense 
of this school favors starting the class in electricity and in 
general favors the building up of the school by the addition 
of new classes whenever possible. The school, though small, 
is efficient in the departments which it maintains. It is well 
equipped for the work now being done but any extension of 
that work will require additional equipment. The school 
operates as far as possible upon a commercial basis, getting 
real work to do and covering the cost of the materials used 
through the returns from the jobs done. This fact applies 
to a larger extent to the automobile department than to any 
other. In November 1924, the Superintendent addressed to 
60 patrons of the school the following note printed upon a 
postcard with a return card for reply : 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 
School Committee 

November 6, 1924 
Dear Sir: 

Knowing that you had work done last year in 
the Automobile Department of the Boys' Vocational 
School, I am writing to you to get your opinion of 
the service given you. This inquiry is made in an 
effort to check up on our work in the interest of 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 191 

conducting it in such a way as to give satisfaction 
to our patrons. Will you, therefore, please fill 
out the attached card and return it to me at your 
early convenience. 

Very truly yours, 

Charles S. Clark 

Superintendent of Schools. 

REPLY CARD 

November 1924 

Reply of to inquiry 

concerning work done for him in the Automobile 
Department of the Boys' Vocational School. 

1. Was the work satisfactory to you? 



2. Do you consider the price charged fair? 



3. Remarks. 



26 cards were returned. Of these replies all expressed 
satisfaction with the work which had been done for them in 
the school. In these days when fault is so easily found with 
everything rendered by way of service for pay and when the 
dissatisfaction of patrons with automobile repairs is so com- 
mon as to be almost proverbial, it is rather surprising to find 
such unanimity of approval for the work which this school 
has done for its patrons. The fact is so outstanding as to 
deserve statement in this place to give the school publicly 
the credit which is its due. 



DIRECTOR OF THRIFT 

One of the distinguishing features of the record of this 
year is the recognition given to thrift instruction as a part of 
the work of the schools by the appointment of an official whose 
sole duty will be to promote the work of thrift. In June the 
School Committee created this position and appointed a di- 
rector to exercise its functions. Since September this official 
has been engaged in making plans for a more general and 
energetic carrying on of this work. These plans include 



192 ANNUAL REPORTS 

establishing the School Savings Bank on a more efficient basis, 
increasing the ways and means for training pupils of all 
grades from the kindergarten through the Senior High School 
in conserving their resources and in saving their money, and 
lessening the work of record-keeping so that teachers shall 
not be burdened with that feature of the undertaking but may 
give their time to the more vital part of the work to be found in 
training pupils to a proper understanding of the value of 
making a right use of their resources. 

The School Savings Bank system was set up in our 
schools under the authority of the School Board in March, 
1912. In nearly every school in Somerville there is now a 
School Savings Bank. Since that time the work has pro- 
gressed creditably with the result that total deposits have 
shown an increase from year to year. This growth is shown 
by a comparison between the work of the School Savings Bank 
in 1912 and that of 1924. In the former year, there were 
1,963 depositors. In the latter, there were 5,116 depositors. 
In 1912 the number of deposits was 7,388. In 1924, there were 
88,553. This increase in the number of deposits is in greater 
ratio than is the increase in the number of depositors and 
would seem to indicate a development in the habit of saving 
greater than the increase in the number of those who were 
depositing. Again there is even greater increase in the a- 
mount deposited. In 1912, the sum was #3,917.16. In 1924, 
it was #58,688.74. The ratio of the amount deposited in 1924 
as compared with the amount deposited in 1912 is far greater 
than the ratio of growth either in the number of depositors 
or in the number of deposits. The amount deposited during 
the first four months of the present year is #20,283.91. Dur- 
ing the same months last year the amount was #15,913.53, an 
excess for the present year under the new plan of #4,370.38. 

There is, therefore, a good foundation for the larger 
effort now to be made. The real objective of this matter is 
the improvement of the attitude of individual pupils of the 
schools in respect to habits of thrift; this is one element of 
character building. As such, it needs to be understood and 
valued by all teachers. Character is not formed by hats ; it is 
formed mainly by repetition of volitions of the individual and 
acts proceeding tliereirom ; it is a slow growth. To continue the 
development of a right habit requires unremitting perse- 
verance. In order for the teaching of thrift to reach a worth 
while objective, children once started on the way to the form- 
ing of a proper habit of thrift must be kept going along that 
path throughout the whole school course. It will amount to 
little to start the children in a habit of depositing in the 
School Savings Bank in the lower grades unless equal or 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 193 

greater efforts to continue the practice are made in the upper 
grades. The full result of such instruction, therefore, should 
be manifested in the High School, the last stage of a child's 
training in the public schools before he goes out to stand or 
fall upon the training that he has received and upon the char- 
acter which he has formed. 

The following report from the Director of Thrift gives 
interesting details of the plans already put into effect as well 
as some of the results : 

December 24, 1925 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Clark : 

I herewith submit a report of the work in Thrift Instruc- 
tion carried on in the schools since the beginning of the 
school year. 

Since the thrift work in the city had not been organized 
prior to this year, it was necessary to find some direct means 
for stimulating interest, as well as to facilitate the distribu- 
tion of such information, materials, and suggestions as would 
help in carrying out a thrift program. To gain these ends, 
a teacher thrift representative was appointed in each build- 
ing to serve as a center through whom other teachers might 
be reached and receive instructions. 

The thrift program, as a whole, resolved itself into the 
following objectives : — to develop a thrift sense among tfie 
pupils through right habit training; to afford the pupils the 
benefit of the practice work contained in the operation of 
school banking through pupil participation ; to relieve the 
teachers of a burden of work with respect to record keeping 
in the banking; to create an interest and desire for thrift 
through motivation, and in general not only to put before the 
pupils thrift principles but rather to offer them the opportu- 
nity to practice the principles so that these may become habits 
of living to guide them in their course of action during their 
school term and in later life. 

Upon the suggestion of a committee of five masters repre- 
senting the Senior High, Junior High, and Elementary schools, 
it was decided that efforts to bring about these objectives 
be concentrated in one school in order to perfect plans which 
could be introduced throughout the system as found prac- 
tical. Many experiments have, therefore, been carried on at 



194 ANNUAL REPORTS 

the Bingham School, especially with reference to the school 
banking. The following has proved the most expedient and 
successful. The collection of the money for the banking 
with the necessary data accompanying it is taken care of 
entirely by sixth grade pupils within the school under the 
supervision of a Senior High School pupil. The actual 
recording and bookkeeping, however, is conducted at the High 
School with a view to incorporating the work as part of a 
regular course in business training. The interest in bank- 
ing has been promoted by personal talks to the classes on the 
value of thrift, by the formation of a council from pupil 
representatives of the rooms, and also by the excellent work 
of the teachers in correlating the regular school work with 
banking and thrift principles in general. Rivalry created 
between the rooms in various ways has resulted in a healthy 
competition and consequent growth. Under this system, the 
pupils have been afforded the opportunity to benefit from 
participation in the banking process, while the teachers have 
not been burdened with detailed work incident to school bank- 
ing. It is significant to note the results on the banking this 
year as compared with those of the previous year. The total 
amount of deposits to date this year at the school are f 1909.23, 
while in the same period last year they were $1377.87. Dur- 
ing this time, the number of deposits in 1925 were 3,832 while 
in 1924, they were 2,466. 

In the Western Junior High School, there has been con- 
centration of another order in the development of the thrift 
idea. Pupil representatives were appointed from among the 
bank depositors to form a Directors' Board which formulates 
thrift plans for the school. Through frequent bulletins, the 
tabulation of statistics, thrift news in the school paper, per- 
sonal efforts by directors in the individual rooms, and various 
other ways, they have succeeded in making their influence 
felt and the results of the awakening of a thrift sense has been 
apparent. The qualities of leadership, initiative, responsi- 
bility, brought to the fore in this way, are important factors 
in the education of our future citizens. 

While the Grammar and Junior High School pupils 
have been developing thrift in their respective schools, the 
Senior High School has not been idle. Aside from the work 
being carried on through the Bookkeeping Department, in 
connection with the record keeping of the lower schools, the 
Students' Council has undertaken the project of advancing 
interest in thrift as part of their program for the year. At 
present they are planning an intensive campaign to enroll 
the students as depositors in the school bank. Their efforts 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 195 

are to be directed throughout the year in emphasizing the 
various phases of thrift. 

In addition to the concentrated work in the individual 
schools, there have been distributed throughout all the schools 
a series of slogans together with a series of posters in an en- 
deavor to center the pupils' attention upon such thoughts and 
Ideals as will lead to the cultivation of good and thrifty hab- 
its. In many instances, the teachers have furthered the work 
by interesting their pupils through thrift songs, poems, 
poster work, dramatizing stories, all of which help to build 
up for the pupils concrete ideas on thrift. With a view to 
extending the sphere of influence of the thrift work by reach- 
ing the pupils through all possible contacts, a thrift shelf 
has been established at the public library. The cooperation 
of the Women's Clubs of the city has been secured and they 
have manifested their active support by offering two prizes 
to the schools for thrift work. 

By the inculcation of thrift principles, the pupils are 
being trained to discriminate values which shall lead to a 
proper evaluation of all the resources at their command. In 
this way, the wise use of time, the proper regard for health, 
the conservation of energy, and the careful use of material 
resources, including money, must all receive attention. To 
be able to use wisely, and to expend carefully, one's resources 
is a matter of long training and practice. The whole school 
course should aim to further this training. A beginning to es- 
tablish it in the curriculum has already been made. Plans to 
enlarge the scope of the work are being formulated. The 
value which can come to the pupils and the results which 
may be attained from this work are in direct proportion to 
the cooperation and intensity of purpose with which the 
teachers approach the subjects in their relation with the 
pupils through their classroom work. 

I wish to take this opportunity to express my apprecia- 
tion for the helpful spirit, the kind cooperation and willing as- 
sistance given me thus far by Mr. Clark, and all those with 
whom it has been my pleasure to plan and work in our new 
<endeavor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. Bella Wiseman, 

Director, 



196 ANNUAL REPORTS 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 

Regular attendance of pupils at school has always been 
recognized by teachers and school officers as a matter of great 
importance. Among the most carefully maintained records 
of the schools are those which show the attendance of in- 
dividual pupils and the percentage of attendance of classes, 
schools, and school systems. A low percentage of attendance 
indicates a lessening of efficiency of the school organization. 
Hence school teachers and school officers use all proper ef- 
forts to secure regularity and punctuality of attendance on 
the part of all pupils. For a number of years the causes of 
absenteeism have seemingly been increasing and the task of 
the schools in preserving a good rate of attendance has been 
growing harder. During this time no statistics have been 
available to the public showing the annual per cent of at- 
tendance for the school systems of the State. Recently, how- 
ever, the Department of Education issued a statement giving 
the per cent of attendance and the rank of towns and cities 
in Massachusetts for the school year ending June 30, 1924. 
This shows the average of the State to be 93.3 % . In a let- 
ter accompanying the statistical sheets, Commissioner Smith 
says, "the percentage of attendance for the State as a whole 
seems very creditable." Somerville with a percentage of 
93.9% is in the first third of the cities and towns. Only 
seven of the larger cities have a higher percentage of attend- 
ance than Somerville. The standing of our city in this State 
list is a good one. It is creditable alike to the character of 
our people, to the disposition of our pupils, and to the suc- 
cessful management of our principals and teachers. 

WORK OF THE SCHOOLS 

As there have been no changes during the year in the 
program of studies of the schools, the report of the work of 
this period is much like that of last year. A few comments, 
however, may well be made which will give some idea of the 
work which has been done in each division of the schools. 

The High School 

The usual number of pupils passed successfully from 
the high school to higher institutions of learning at the end 
of the last school year. Among the institutions which grad- 
uates of the high school entered were : 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



197 



Amherst College 
Bates College 
Boston College 
Boston University 
Brown University 
Dartmouth College 
Fitchburg Normal School 
Georgetown University 
Harvard University 
Holy Cross 
Jackson College 
Lehigh University 



Mass. School of Pharmacy 

Mass. Inst, of Tech 

Mt. St. Mary's College 

Normal Art School 

Northeastern University 

Radcliffe College 

Salem Normal School 

Simmons College 

Skidmore College 

Tufts College 

Tufts Pre-Medical School 



Notwithstanding the good record of our high school in 
the matter of fitting for higher institutions, the criticism is 
occasionally heard that "the high school does not prepare for 
college." The facts of the local situation disprove this crit- 
icism. However, there is nothing original about this crit- 
icism when it is made in Somerville. It is indigenous to every 
clime and to ever}' community. What high school principal 
has not heard it more than once? Against this unjust crit- 
icism it is pleasant to be able to place a statement of a grad- 
uate of last year's class in our high school written from col- 
lege to his parents with no expectation of its coming to the 
eye of school officials. It will be of interest to our citizens 
to hear it. The first extract is from a letter written to the 
boy's parents shortly after he entered college. In this the 
student pays tribute to his preparation. The second quota- 
tion is from a letter written after he had taken a placement 
examination in Latin and shows that as a result of his ex- 
amination he was placed in the highest Latin group. The 
two extracts are as follows: 

Extract from First Letter 

I am playing tennis a good deal and am not 
studying too hard. Perhaps not hard enough, be- 
cause they mark awfully hard up here. No resem- 
blance to high school. I find, however, that the 
Somerville High School has prepared me well. 
From a comparison of my basic knowledge with 
that of others even from Prep. Schools I find I 
do not suffer. In other words the S. H. S. has a 
high standard and admirably fits one for college, if 
he will allow himself to be so fitted. 



Extract from Second Letter 

And now a little about college. A few days 
ago we took a placement examination in Latin. 



198 ANNUAL REPORTS 

If we failed it we were to be dropped back a year 
and take Vergil all over; if we did fairly well we 
were to stay where we were ; and if we did very well 
we were to be advanced to Latin VII. I worried a 
good deal after I took the exam for fear I had been 
careless. So much depended on it! But the re- 
sults were given out today and I was told that I 
have been advanced to Latin VII. Only about five 
or six others in the class were so advanced. 

Our high school, like all other high schools, is going 
through the experience of dealing with a student body pre- 
senting great variations of racial derivation, cultural back- 
ground, intellectual ability, and scholarship attainments. 
This condition has approached the school stealthily without 
any advance notice of its coming, but the faculty of the school 
is aware of its arrival. The present day problem of high 
school administration and teaching is very unlike that even of a 
decade ago. To meet the present problem adequately, readjust- 
ments and rearrangements must be made. These readjust- 
ments will not fail in the preparatory courses so much as in 
courses of a more general nature. In recognition of this prob- 
lem, certain expedients have been used during the present year. 
Among these are the following: A class of first year over-age 
pupils has been organized under special instruction. Achieve- 
ment tests have been given in United States History under 
the direction of Prof. Edwin A. Shaw of the Harvard Grad- 
uate School of Education. Intelligence and achievement 
tests have been given in English for the purpose of read- 
justing divisions. A questionnaire has been given to all pu- 
pils in the school, under the direction of the English Depart- 
ment, for furnishing information to be used in a better class- 
ification and direction of the pupils of the school. 

Junior High Schools 

These schools have continued to work under the schedule 
of studies adopted several years ago. While modifications 
have been made of the subject matter in several of the studies 
since that time, the general program of studies has not been 
fundamentally changed. Under the direction of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, a plan of revision has been made this fall 
which will involve the cooperation of all the teachers of the 
Junior High Schools. It is intended to scrutinize the whole 
field of Junior High School undertaking and to modify our 
curricula of study wherever that can be done to the advan- 
tage of our Junior High Schools. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 199^ 

The work of this year has been characterized by enthus- 
iasm shared by the faculties and pupils of the schools. There- 
are abundant evidences of this enthusiasm in each of the 
three Junior High Schools. If the function of education is 
to provide a medium in which youth may live, grow, and 
learn, then the Junior High Schools of Somerville are doing 
that work well. Among the outstanding features of these 
schools is the training given to the pupils to exercise initia- 
tive, self-direction, self-control, and independent action. 
These characteristics are manifested in various kinds of school 
work. They are shown in contributions to the school paper. 
They are shown in various extra curriculum activities. They 
are shown in classroom exercises. In brief, life more abound- 
ing is evident in all of the activities of our Junior High 
Schools. An interesting evidence of the opportunity which 
these schools present was shown by an incident which oc- 
cnred this year. Prizes had been offered to the High School 
and to the Junior High Schools for the best compositions on 
City Zoning. The winner of the second prize in the Junior 
High School was a lad born in a foreign country, who came to 
this country in his fourth year and has received all his educa- 
tion in the schools of Somerville. The language of his home 
is mainly a foreign language. The children alone speak habit- 
ually English outside of the home. Yet this boy, so derived 
and trained, has secured in competition a prize for one of the 
best essays on City Zoning awarded to pupils in the Junior 
High Schools of the city of his adoption. 

Elementary Schools 

As no important changes have been made in the course 
of study for the first six grades the effort of the year has been 
to do well the things which constituted the so-called fund- 
amentals of education. Various methods have been employ- 
ed by supervising principals to improve the work of their 
schools. In the early part of the year one supervising prin- 
cipal in connection with the Harvard Graduate School of 
Education examined the children of the 5th and 6th grades 
of his district, using for that purpose the Dearborn Group 
Intelligence Test. As a result of this examination he ar- 
ranged the children in classes according to mental ages. This 
grouping has proven very satisfactory and will be continued 
as the working plan of the school. A striking instance of 
the benefit of this change was given in the case of a boy who 
had been the most troublesome pupil in the school. The test 
gave him a high I. Q. and a high mental age. After he had 
been put in a class with others of corresponding mental age 



200 ANNUAL REPORTS 

his conduct became entirely normal and satisfactory and 
has continued to be so. Increasing attention is being given by 
principals and teachers to all the conditions which tend to 
create differences of attainment among the pupils of the 
schools and attempts are being made constantly to adjust 
the teaching methods to the differing needs. The transfer of 
the 7th and 8th grades to the junior high schools has given 
to the 6th grade the importance of a terminal position, an 
importance which is shared to some extent by the 5th grade. 
There is noticeable in these grades a degree of power for self 
direction and initiative which was not apparent in children 
of these grades when they were occupying a position sub- 
ordinate to the 7th and 8th grades in the same building. 
Special emphasis has been given throughout the year to those 
studies and exercises which have for their purpose the develop- 
ment of character. Among these are the work in Civics, 
(conduct), in Health (forming right habits). Safety Educa- 
tion, and Thrift. 

Evening Schools 

The evening schools embrace the high school, elemen- 
tary classes, classes in Americanization work, and practical 
arts classes. 

Evening High School — The Evening High School has 
maintained throughout the present school year the large in- 
crease of membership which it secured during the previous 
year. A change in program has been made giving three forty- 
minute periods each evening in the place of two sixty-min- 
ute periods. This change was made as a consequence of some 
experimenting during the previous year. Under the new plan 
a pupil may take more subjects, a fact which has apprecia- 
bly increased interest. 

Elementary Classes — Elementary Classes are conducted 
in the Bell School building and in the Cliff building. While 
these classes are not large, having an average membership 
of about 110 pupils, the interest is keen and the work is earn- 
est and useful. 

Americanization Work — Twenty-two non-English speak- 
ing nationalities are represented in the Americanization work 
being carried on by the schools. Each of these nationalities 
is contributing in a helpful way to the development of our 
city. While the number of foreign-born coming to Somer- 
ville is decreasing, there remains the intensive work of in- 
troducing those who are here more fully into the cultural, 
industrial, and civic life of the city. There is an increasing 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 201 

number of these foreign-born men and women attending the 
Americanization classes for the purpose of preparing for 
Citizenship. 

Evening Practical Arts Classes — Classes in Millinery 
and Dressmaking were continued this year in the Cliff and 
High School buildings. In the two schools 134 women have 
regularly attended the Dressmaking Classes while the Milli- 
nery Classes have had a membership of 48. This work has 
been followed with interest by the members of the class and 
has given the women practical instruction in making their 
own apparel. 

Continuation Schools 

The Continuation Schools of Somerville, now in the 
sixth year of their existence on a compulsory basis, are con- 
tinuing the development of children who have become work- 
ers to the end that they may live well with themselves and 
with their fellow men. This year the follow-up work car- 
ried on by the teachers has been made more effective by the 
inauguration of a system of job analysis. The schools have 
good attendance and the pupils maintain an attitude of in- 
terest which is favorable to their getting the most from the 
opportunities which the schools afford. 

Special Classes 

Four classes are conducted for children three or more 
years retarded in their studies. Pupils for these schools are 
discovered through the work of the psychological clinic which 
makes an annual examination of pupils who are so back- 
ward in their school work as to make attendance upon a 
special class advantageous to them. As a result of these 
examinations there is now a list of pupils recommended for 
attendance upon classes of this type. Not all of these chil- 
dren have left the regular grade school classes. There is lack- 
ing now in the situation an authoritative determination of 
the status of such pupils. Under the State Law the city is 
required to maintain classes for such pupils, the obvious in- 
tention being to provide a better training for them than can 
be given in the class of the ordinary type. It happens, how- 
ever, that for various reasons parents of some of these chil- 
dren insist upon having them remain in the regular graded 
classes. In this way, the purpose of this provision is de- 
feated and the work of the regular grade classes is hindered. 
It is desirable in the near future that all of the children re- 
tarded three or more years should be gathered in special 



202 ANNUAL REPORTS 

classes and should be given the specific training suited to 
their needs. There are at the present time in the four 
atypical classes 60 pupils. Another special class is the Sight 
Saving Class, for children of defective eyesight. This class 
is maintained by the School Committee in cooperation with 
the Department of Education. Only children who have been 
examined and recommended by the ophthamologist of the 
State Department of Education are admitted to this class. 
Large-faced type is used in all the reading matter. The 
handwork is all of a kind which places no strain upon the 
eyes. There are at present in this class 11 pupils. 

SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

In order to focus attention upon the most outstanding 
needs of the immediate future, I submit the following three 
recommendations : 

(1) That the high school building situation receive 
immediate attention, to determine what shall be done to pro- 
vide suitable additional accommodations. 

(2) That consideration be given to the situation in the 
eastern part of the city with a view of determining what ac- 
commodations must be made for the increase of pupils con- 
sequent upon the building up of the Ten Hills Farm section. 

(3) That attention be given immediately to the peti- 
tion of the teachers for a general increase of salaries, in order 
that determination upon this question may be made in the 
first part of the municipal year. 

CONCLUSION 

This survey of the condition of the schools for the year 
1925 affords many reasons for gratification to our city. The 
fact that every child in the elementary schools can attend 
school all day and have a seat to himself is the first and great 
cause for satisfaction. This is a condition by no means 
universal in cities of the State. It is a fundamental of good 
school conditions. The second reason for gratification is the 
generous provision of opportunities for the children of Som- 
erville which the school system affords. Diversified needs re- 
quire the provision of diversified opportunity. These the 
schools of Somerville present to a high degree. Such diver- 
sification is also a fundamental of a good school system. A 
third cause for gratification is the sympathetic, intelligent, 
and efficient conduct of the school work by principals and 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 203 

teachers. Such a condition is the crowning distinction of 
a school system. Still another cause for gratification is the 
cordial cooperation ..existing between the schools and the 
homes. Through Parent-Teacher Associations and through 
visitations, the parents are in close touch with the schools 
and are cooperating to secure the best advancement of the 
children. This is a condition of great importance and of 
great promise. The development of the youth of the land 
is a work which can be best accomplished when the influence 
of the home supplements that of the school, each contributing 
harmoniously something that the other lacks and both com- 
prehending that the proper development of the youth of today 
is essential to the welfare of the State of tomorrow. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark, 

December 28, 1925 Superintendent of Schools. 



204 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE HIGH SCHOOL 

February 1, 1926 
Mr. Charles S. Clark 

Superintendent of Schools 
Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Mr. Clark: 

A report from the High School for 1925 offers very- 
little of an unusual character. 

In athletics the erection of a locker building on Dilboy 
Field has met an outstanding need. The winning of the base- 
ball championship and an improved standing in football 
showed commendable effort and spirit. The giving of a din- 
ner to the football boys by a group of High School Alumni 
showed a healthy interest from outside in the physical wel- 
fare of our pupils and should produce helpful and needed re- 
sults. A cup for the best all-round athlete and scholar 
presented by Robert M. Garland in memory of his brother 
Chester Otis Garland will be an excellent stimulant to the 
best kind of athlete. The granting of diploma credits by the 
School Committee for regular and faithful participation in 
school sports is also a helpful step. 

In debating an increasing interest has been apparent. 
Teams representing the Girls' and Boys' Societies have won 
debates with other schools during the year. 

Without going into detail regarding many other forms 
of school achievement and school activities which are com- 
mendable, I should like to devote the rest of my report to one 
phase of school organization which has been very helpful and 
which has been carried further in the Somerville High School 
than in most schools, i. e. student cooperation. 

Student cooperation appears in the school in three ways. 

(1) By organizations which are of an advisory and 
inspirational type such as the Students' Council. 

(2) By organizations which have to do with the rou- 
tine administration of the building such as the 
Traffic Squad. 

(3) By the filling, on the part of the pupils, of posi- 
tions of leadership. 

The Students' Council is an organization made up of the 
officers of each class, the floor proctors and two teachers. The 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 205 

class officers are elected by the classes. Each room elects 
a proctor. The proctors on each floor elect one of their 
number to serve as floor proctor on the council. The teacher 
representatives are appointed by the Headmaster. This or- 
ganization works in the school life as follows : by suggestions 
made to the pupils through the school bulletin, by work 
through the proctors in the home rooms, and by assemblies 
under its charge. Certain matters which have been dealt 
with this past year through the Students' Council have been 
Courtesy Week, the Red Cross Drive, athletics, and recent- 
ly a very successful drive for Thrift. The Students' Council 
is considering at present, ways and means of improving at- 
tendance in the school, regarding it not as an object in itself 
but rather as a means of teaching regularity, punctuality, 
and the higher conception of Thrift. 

The Traffic Squad is an organization based on an en- 
tirely different plan. Where the Students' Council is large- 
ly advisory and suggestive, the Traffic Squad is primarily ex- 
ecutive. Under proper organization, about eighty boys and 
girls constitute a Traffic Squad for the school. The members of 
this squad are selected by the pupils though right of rejec- 
tion, seldom employed, is in the hands of the Head Master. 
This Traffic Squad supervises all filing throughout the build- 
ing. This supervision may be taken as a form of safety 
work in that accidents are much less likely to happen under 
pupil supervision. In addition to the supervision of the fil- 
ing, the Traffic Squad has duties to perform in case of fire- 
drill and at recess, both within and without the building. In 
other words the Traffic Squad is an administrative pupils' 
organization formed to care for the welfare of the pupils, 
their safety in emergency and the proper protection of the 
building. These young people act as ushers in all assemblies. 
The whole-hearted interest which they take in the work and 
the excellent quality of the result of their effort speak well 
for the valuable experience and excellent training which they 
are deriving. 

The third form of student cooperation is shown in the ad- 
ministration of extra curriculum activities, as practically every 
pupil organization in the school is under pupil leadership. 
There are about fifty physical training groups, each having two 
pupil leaders who are elected by their own members. These 
pupils direct the daily physical training exercises and 
are a nucleus for the officers controlling military manoeuvres 
which take place on class day. The orchestras, Glee Clubs, 
Band, Fife and Drum Corps, Bugle and Drum Corps, English 
Club, Dramatic Society — in fact all student organization, — 
all have pupil leaders. The school paper, The Radiator, is 



206 ANNUAL REPORTS 

practically under pupil organization. The editor, business 
manager, and all other officers, except two faculty advisors, 
are pupils. The success of these different organizations under 
pupil leadership has been most striking. The reaction on 
the other pupils of the school has been to develop a greater 
spirit of cooperation and interest than would otherwise have 
been secured. In other words, we feel not only do the pupils 
who have occupied these positions of leadership get great in- 
dividual gain but that the rest of the school gets an equal 
gain in that it acquires the habit of following leadership of 
the right kind. The result of good to the school in loyalty, 
initiative, experience, and responsibility is indeed great. 
Training for citizenship is one of the important functions of 
a school. We feel that we are meeting this need in training 
pupils to think for themselves, to take initiative, and to follow 
right thinking and helpful leadership. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John A. Avery, 

Head Master. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 207 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Students Entering Higher Institutions in September 1925 

Amherst College 1 

Bates College 1 

Boston College 9 

Boston University 19 

Brown University 1 

Dartmouth College 3 

Fitchburg Normal 2 

Georgetown University 1 

Harvard University 8 

Holy Cross 1 

Jackson College 5 

Lehigh University 1 

Mass. School of Pharmacy 5 

Mass. Institute of Technology 7 

Mt. St. Mary's College 3 

Mass. Normal Art School 3 

Northeastern University 3 

Radcliffe College 4 

Salem Normal 8 

Simmons College 11 

Skidmore College 1 

Tufts College 9 

Tufts Pre-Medical 3 

Wheelock School 1 



110 

Entering College 84 

Entering Scientific Schools 12 

Entering Normal Schools 14 



"Statement Showing Distribution of High School Pupils 

By Subjects, December 1925. 

English 2101 

History 1487 

Problems in Citizenship 70 

Elocution 986 

Debating 65 

French 930 

Latin 525 

Greek 32 

Spanish 442 

German 61 

Astronomy and Geology 43 

Biology 272 

Chemistry 474 

Physics 290 

Physiology 51 

Geometry 403 

Algebra 194 



208 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Revised Algebra 250 

Revised Geometry 191 

Solid Geometry '. 42 

Trigonometry 47 

Bookkeeping 302 

Penmanship 711 

Typewriting 562 

Stenography 538 

Salesmanship 128 

Commerce and Industry 425 

Commercial Law 36 

Commercial Arithmetic 65 

Manual Training 146 

Mechanical Drawing 333 

Freehand Drawing 322 

Household Arts Ill 

Cooking 30 

Sewing 124 

Membership of High School Activities 

December 1925 

Girls' Debating Society 20 

Boys' Debating Society 32 

School Orchestra (2) 72 

School Band and Drum Corps 86 

Girls' Glee Club (2) 145 

Boys' Glee Club 38 

Mandolin Club 14 

Girls' Athletic Association 50 

High School Athletic Association * 

Players' Club 50 

Chess Club 10 

Students' Council 18 

Spanish Club 50 

English Club 90 

Radio Club 25 

Slide Rule Club 30 

*A11 members of the school are considered members. 

SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 
1925-1926 



President, Walter P. Sweet 

^ T . _, . , ( Arthur N. Small 

Vice-Presidents, j Martha M Power 

Sec'y Treasurer, Frances E. Biller 



Executive Committee 

Charles S. Clark, Ex-Officio 

Ruth E. Arrington, High 
Olive M. Brownell, Southern Jr. 
Ellen L. Bellamy, Western Jr. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 209' 

Benjamin Q. Belonga, Northeastern Jr. 

Benjamin C. Bowman, Boys' Vocational 

Marion H. Hathaway, Continuation 

Gertrude T. Donahue, Prescott 

Martha L. Littlefield, Hanscom 

Alice M. Hayes, Bennett 

Maria D. McLeod, Baxter 

Helen F. Gallagher, Knapp 

Sarah E. Murphy, Perry 

M. Abbie Tarbett, Pope 

Elizabeth L. Hersey, Cummings 

Marjorie Gustin, Glines 

Carrie T. Lincoln, Forster 

Ruth A. Gilman, Bingham 

Lillian E. Haskell, Carr 

Gertrude Prichard, Morse 

Ethel F. Morang, Proctor 

Grace E. Packard, Durell 

Ruth E. Andrews, Burns 

Mildred S. Flint, Brown 

Carrie E. Crockett, Highland 

Wilma S. Bryant, Cutler 

Eliza H. Lunt, Lincoln 

Maude C. Valentine, Lowe 

The meetings held under the auspices of this association 
in the year 1925 were as follows : 

January 14 — Mr. Frederick Wallis, "Americanization." 

April 21 — Prof. Edwin A. Shaw, Harvard College. "Psychology and 

Measurements." 
June 1 — Annual Meeting. 

November 4 — Miss Alice Grady of the Savings Bank Life Insurance 
Co., State House. Address. 



SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' CLUB 
Officers 1925-1926 

President. Miss Alice M. Dicker 

^ . -, , I Miss Adele Abbott 
Vice Presidents, { ffigg Edith L Laycock 

Recording Secretary, Miss Helen C. Jackson 
Corresponding Secretary, Miss Mabel H. Eddy 
Treasurer, Miss E. Bella Weisman 
Auditor, Miss Elizabeth Campbell 



Object 

The object shall be to secure a close union among the 
women teachers in Somerville; to promote the spirit of mu- 
tual helpfulness ; to advance professional interests ; to create 
a deeper sense of the dignity of the profession ; to unite the 
interest of the home and school. 



210 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Program 

January 14. — "Immigration and Americanization", Hon. Frederick A. 

Wallis. 
February 11. — Current Events, Mrs. Grace Morrison Poole. 
March 11. — "What is Economy in Education?" Mr. Jesse H. Newlon. 
April 8. — Guest Night. Reception, Entertainment. 
May 13. — Annual Meeting, Outing. 
October 14. — "California the Beautiful and the Wonders of the Golden 

Southwest," Mr. Henry Warren Poor. 
November 4. — "Portrayal of Telegraphy," by Employees of N. E. Tel. 

and Tel. Co. 
November 11. — Address by Dr. Teyhi Hsieh of China — Supper. 
December 4. ) t} _ 00 _ 
December 5. ) mzaar — 
December 14. — "California the Beautiful and the Wonders of the 

Golden Southwest." Mr. Henry Warren Poor. 
December 16. — Christmas Party. All American Program, Miss Myrtle 

Jordan. 



SOMEIFWILLE HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Annual Report of the Treasurer January 1, 1926 
Receipts 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1925 $1,115 58 

Baseball games $1,819 98 

Football games 4,156 90 

Minor sports 80 57 

Interest 6 63 

Miscellaneous 52 12 

6,116 20 



$7,231 78 
Expenditures 

Athletic Supplies $2,203 03 

Medical Supplies and Service 190 38 

Paid visiting teams 999 81 

Officials 344 00 

Police 525 00 

Assistance at games 130 00 

Postage 11 40 

Printing 65 75 

Telephone 34 63 

Transportation 240 65 

Coaching , 543 50 

Physician's Salary 200 00 

Treasurer's Salary 400 00 

Dues to Athletic Association 22 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 177 78 

$6,087 93 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1926 $1,143 85 

George E. Pearson, 

Treasurer. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 211 



3tt ifllrmnrtam 

ALICE M. SABEN 

Hanscom School 
Died April 5, 1925 



MARY A. Q'DONOGHUE 

Northeastern Junior High School 
Died April 23, 1925 



512 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 215 



CONTENTS OF APPENDIX 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

Population and school census. 

School buildings. 

Teachers. 

Attendance for year. 

Cost of school maintenance. 

Teachers' salaries. 

Result of eye and ear tests. 

MISCELLANEOUS TABLES 

CONCERNING FINANCE 

No. of Table. 

1. Schedule of school property. 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, school year 1924-1925. 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, school year 1924-1925. 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of year. 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings and for re- 

pairs for a series of years. 



CONCERNING PUPILS 

7. Population and school registration. 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for school year 1924-1925. 

9. Statistics of the high school for school year 1924-1925. 

10. Pupils by grades, June, 1925. 

11. Separate statistics for high, junior high, elementary and vo» 

cational schools, for school year 1924-1925. 

12. Admissions to first grade in September. 

13. Number of junior high school graduates, 1925. 

14. Truant statistics for a series of years. 

15. Evening school statistics, 1924-1925. 

16. Elementary school promotees for a series of years. 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years. 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years. 

19. Promotions, junior high schools, 1925. 
19a Promotions, elementary schools, 1925. 



CONCERNING TEACHERS 

20. Resignations of teachers, 1925. 

21. Teachers elected in 1925. 

22. Leave of absence of teachers. 

23. Transfers of teachers. 

24. Number of teachers employed for a series of years. 



216 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



STATISTICAL AND GENERAL TABLES 

25. Changes in textbooks, 1925. 

26. High and Junior High School graduation exercises, 1925. 

27. Vocational school graduation exercises, 1925. 

28. Organization of school board for 1926. 

29. Teachers in service January, 1926. 

30. Officers in service January, 1926. 

31. School janitors. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 
1.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS 

Population, state census, 1895 52,200 

Population, United States census, 1900 61,643 

Population, state census, 1905 69,272 

Population, United States census, 1910 77,236 

Population, state census, 1915 86,854 

Population, United States census, 1920 93,033 

Children between five and fifteen years of age inclusive, 

April, 1925 by school census 17,591 

2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Number of school buildings in June 31 

Number of classrooms in use in June 401 

Valuation of school property $3,216,400 



In high schools 

In junior high schools 

In elementary schools 

In kindergartens 

Total in elementary schools . 

Vocational school for boys 

Independent Household Arts 

Atypical classes 

Sight Saving 

Cadet teachers 

Special 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Total 



TEACHERS 

♦1924 
73 


•1925 

74 

118 

219 

14 

233 

8 

1 

4 

1 

12 

9 

4 

2 


Change 

+ 1 


116 


+2 


210 


+9 


14 





224 

8 


+ 9 



1 
4 






1 





14 


—2 


10 


— 1 


4 





2 










457 



466 



+9 



4.— ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR 



Entire enrollment for the year. 

Average number belonging 

Average number attending 

Per cent, of daily attendance... 

High school graduates 

Junior High school graduates... 



1924 


*1925 


Change 


16,092 


16,262 


+170 


14,554 


14,699 


+145 


13,647 


13,691 


+44 


93.8 


93.1 


—0.7 


496 


524 


+28 


1,050 


1,060 


+10 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



217 



5.— COST OF SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 



♦1924 

Salaries of teachers $755,016 61 

Salaries of officers 14,756 09 

Cost of books and supplies.... 52,757 14 

Cost of light and power 9,802 96 

Cost of janitors' services, etc. 67,276 47 

Cost of fuel and insurance.... 34,162 46 
Total cost of day and evening 

schools 933,771 73 

Per capita cost 64 16 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 157,537 15 

Per capita cost 81 35 



♦1925 


Change 


$775,366 26 


+ 20,349 65 


15,596 48 


+ 840 39 


45,259 71 


—7,497 43 


12,225 69 


+ 2,422 73 


73,966 48 


+ 6,690 01 


41,846 38 


+ 7,683 92 


964,261 00 


+ 30,489 27 


65 60 


+ 1 44 


163,791 60 


+ 6,254 45 


80 05 


—1 30 



6.— MISCELLANEOUS 

*1924 *1925 Chang-e 

Paid for new school build- 
ings 289.938 66 18,663 86 —271,274 80 

Repairs and permanent 

improvements 57,593 06 45,847 81 —11,745 25 

Total school expenditures 1,281,303 45 1,028,772 67 —252,530 78 

Valuation of city 99,311,000 00 104,769,800 00 +5,458,800 00 

Number of dollars spent 
to maintain schools out 
of every $1,000 of valua- 
tion 9 40 9 20 —0 20 

Number of dollars spent 
for all school purposes 
out of every $1,000 of 
valuation 12 90 9 84 —3 06 



* School year. 



Cost of the Schools 



The total amount spent for the maintenance of the 
schools of Somerville for the school vear ending June 30, 
1925, is 1964,261.00. 

This includes the sums spent for care of school build- 
ings, including janitors' services, fuel, light, and school tele- 
phones ; the amount paid for salaries of officers, and the 
amount spent for school supplies ; and the sum paid for sal- 
aries of teachers. 

The expenditure for care for school buildings is wholly 
in charge of the City Government. 



The amount paid for janitors is $73,966 4s 

The cost of fuel is 41,846 38 

The cost of light is 12,225 69 

A total cost of $128,038 55 

The cost per capita 8 71 

Cost of repairs 45,847 81 



218 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



The second important expenditure is wholly under the 
control of the School Committee and is covered by what is 
known as the '"School Contingent" appropriation. The fol- 
lowing is the itemized account : — 







Day Schools. 


Evening 


Schools. 


Continuation 
Schools and 


Expenditures. 


Total. 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Americaniza- 
tion work 


Officers' Sala- 
ries 


$15,596.48 

3443 80 

14,099.96 

24,145.09 
3,570.86 












Office Expenses 












Textbooks 


$5,495.54 

12,921.71 
1,533.82 


$8,531.55 

10,456.17 
1,800.18 


$54.71 

460.86 
133.84 




$18.16 


Stationery and 
Supplies and 
Other Ex- 
penses of In- 
struction 

Miscellaneous 
(Tuition, etc.) 


40.81 
8.69 


265.54 
94.33 


Total 


$60,856.19 


$19,951.07 


$20,787.90 


$649.41 


$49.50 


$378.03 



The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is the sum spent for the salaries of teachers. This 
expenditure is under the control of the School Committee. 

The following statement shows the distribution of the 
sums paid for salaries : — 





Day Schools. 


Evening Schools. 


Continuation 
school8 and 


Expenditures. 


Total. 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Americaniza- 
tion work 


Supervisors 


$15,004.50 

50,162.50 

710,199.26 


$4,217.56 

12.707.50 

225,447.99 


$9,786.84 

33,540.00 

467,583.37 






1,000.00 


Principals 

Teachers 


$627 00 
6,439.00 


$438.00 
1,071.00 


2,850.00 
9,658.00 






Total 


$775,366.26 


$242,373.05 


$510,910.21 


$7,066.00 


$1,509.00 


$13,508.00 



The total outlay for all school purposes includes all of 
the preceding and the sums spent for schoolhouse repairs and 
new buildings. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 219 

The total outlay for the school year ending June 30, 1925 
is as follows: — 

Care $128,038 55 

Contingent 45,259 71 

Salaries '. 790,962 74 

Total for school maintenance $964,261 00 

Paid for repairs 45,847 81 

Paid for new buildings 15,126 36 

Total for all school purposes $1,025,235 17 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools 
has been divided in the following proportion : — 





1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


Janitors' salaries .... 


$0,074 


$0,070 


$0,070 


$0,068 


$0,072 


$0,077 




0.063 


0.085 


0.042 


0.080 


0.047 


0.056 


Administration 


0.020 


0.015 


0.015 


0.015 


0.016 


0.016 




0.053 


0.030 


0.048 


0.047 


0.057 


0.047 


Teachers' salaries.... 


0.790 


0.800 


0.825 


0.790 


0.808 


0.804 



$1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 



220 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Per Capita Cost. The proper method of comparison of 
the cost of schools year by year is to consider the sum spent 
for each pupil in the average membership. In this computa- 
tion we exclude the cost of evening schools, and the voca- 
tional schools. The following shows : — 



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SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



221 



Including the cost of maintenance of evening schools, the 
per capita cost is as follows: — 



Cost of Instruction 

Cost of Supplies 

Cost of Care 

Total 



1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


$44 34 


$50 07 


$50 90 


$50 39 


$51 21 


$51 25 


2 80 


1 60 


2 77 


2 85 


3 34 


2 79 


7 45 


9 62 


6 73 


9 24 


7 39 


8 35 



$54 59 $61 29 $60 40 $62 48 $61 94 $62 39 



An examination of these tables shows that we have paid 
$1.00 less for the instruction of each pupil in the High School 
than in 1924, and 92 cents less per pupil for supplies. 

The elementary schools have cost 25 cents more per pupil 
for instruction, and 53 cents less for supplies. 

The amount spent for the school year 1925 was $9.20, 
or 20 cents less than was spent in 1924. The amount yielded 
for each child in the average membership of the schools for 
1925, not including the vocational schools, was $62.39. 

TEACHERS' SALARIES 

The salaries paid to teachers in January 1926 are as 
follows : — 

1 man $4,100 2 men, 10 women 

1 



man 

men 

man 

men 

men, 

man 

man 

man 

man 

man 

man 

man 

men 

men 

men 

woman 

man 

man 

man 

man 

men 

men, 1 

man 

men 

man 

man, 

men, 

man, 

men, 



♦Part time. 



3,575 

3,175 

3,125 

3,100 

1 woman 3,075 

3,050 

3,000 

2,950 

2,850 

2,775 

2,700 

2,600 

2,575 

2,550 

2,500 

2,475 

2,350 

2,325 

2,300 

2,275 

2,200 

woman 2,150 

2,125 

2,100 

2,075 

woman 2,050 

woman 2,000 

women 1,975 

woman 1,950 

14 women 



men, 10 

woman 

woman 

women 



10 women 

3 women 

1 man, 25 women .. 

9 women 

17 women 

23 women 

22 women 

2 women 

26 women 

20 women 

*1 man, 59 women 



women 



1 man, 90 

2 women 

1 woman 

5 women 

1 woman 

4 women 

7 women 

2 women 

2 women 

11 women 

4 women 

2 women 

1 man, 12 women 

1 woman 

2 women 

1,000 



$1,900 
1,875 
1,850 
1,825 
1,800 
1,775 
1,750 
1,725 
1,700 
1,675 
1,650 
1,625 
1,600 
1,575 
1,550 
1,500 
1,475 
1,450 
1,400 
1,375 
1,350 
1,300 
1,275 
1,250 
1,200 
1,175 
1,150 
1,100 
1,075 
1,050 



222 ANNUAL REPORTS 

SIGHT AND HEARING 

The following give the results of the eye and ear tests : — 



Number of pupils enrolled 

Number found defective in eyesight.... 

Number found defective in hearing 

Number of parents notified 



1925 


1924 


Change 


14.545 


14,504 


+41 


1,549 


1,719 


—170 


168 


183 


—15 


1,282 


1,367 


—85 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



223 



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224 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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225 



Table 2. — Cost of Maintaining Schools 



FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1924-25. 



Schools. 



High 

Northeastern Jr 

Southern Jr, 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Boys' Vocational 

Independent House- 
hold Arts 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Total 



From School Appropriation. 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 



$153,886.86 
81,269.90 
65,241.30 
67,261.00 
32,340.15 
17,854.37 
20,868.42 

9,584.26 
17,032.00 
11,244.45 
20,444.81 

7,057.62 
, 4,355.68 
23,986.10 
11,595.99 
28,350.48 
25,523.56 
19,747.39 
13,734.91 

7,131.58 
14,195.22 
17,352.41 
12,140.11 
36,652.88 

6,571.70 
14,136.69 

6,470.30 

1,618.10 
18,524.80 

2,332.50 

8,677.80 
6,942.10 
6,837.30 



Supplies. 



$790,962.74 



$12,775.93 

6,131.16 

3,378.83 

3,115.42 

1,249.00 

567.79 

992.09 

262.11 

784.34 

456.61 

694.31 

260.00 

137.88 

898.03 

736.28 

1,046.71 

731.15 

675.72 

493.17 

221.17 

419.75 

713.39 

474.33 

1,457.33 

251.06 

505.77 

320.73 

158.61 

4,020.63 

126.49 
733.77 
366.85 
103.30 



$45,259.71 



Spent by City 
Government. 



Care. 



$18,734.01 
9,684.38 
8,029.70 
8,267.26 
6,953.92 
3,083.83 
3,311.18 
2,323.52 
3,378.99 
2,323.52 
3,476.99 
1,904.36 
3,476.99 
3,844.16 
3,634.55 
4,387.08 
4,261.73 
3,502.99 
2,874.27 
1,904.36 
2,716.67 
3,083.83 
2,611.27 
6,167.60 
1,904.36 
2,716.67 
1,128.36 
278.61 
2,262.62 

1,093.53 

1,513.88 

2,253.36 

950.00 



$128,038.55 



Total 

$185,396.80 

97,085.44 

76,649.83 

78,643.68 

40,543.07 

21,505.99 

25,171.69 

12,169.89 

21,195.33 

14,024.58 

24,616.11 

9,221.98 

7,970.55 

28,728.29 

15,966.82 

33.784.27 

30,516.44 

23,926.10 

17,102.35 

9,257.11 

17,331.64 

21,149.63 

15,225.71 

44,277.81 

8,727.12 

17,359.13 

7,919.39 

2,055.32 

24,808.05 

3,552.52 

30,925.45 

9,562.31 

7,890.60 

$964,261.00 



226 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 3. — Per Capita Cost of Maintaining Schools 
FOIR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1924-25 



Schools. 



High 

Northeastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Oarr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns j 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Elementary 

All schools (without 
state-aided schools) 



Boys' Vocational 

Ind. Household Arts. 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 



$75.21 
59.54 
61.43 
59.05 
41.03 
44.52 
44.98 
67.49 
38.36 
41.80 
40.81 
41.27 
34.30 
39.78 
34.61 
41.24 
43.34 
43.21 
43.74 
42.20 
45.79 
44.27 
50.86 
41.84 
43.81 
47.28 
111.56 
161.81 
10.97 
41.08 
19.10 
42.43 

51.25 



220.53 
14.05 



Supplies. 



24 

49 
18 
74 
1.59 
1.42 
2.14 
1.85 
1.77 
1.70 
1.39 
1.52 
1.09 
1.49 
2.20 
1.52 
1.24 
1.48 
1.57 
1.31 
1.35 
1.82 
1.71 
1.66 
1.67 



69 
53 



15.86 
.93 

2.17 
.29 

1.60 

2.79 



47.86 
.76 



Care. 



$9.16 
7.09 
7.56 
7.26 
8.84 
7.69 
7.14 

16.36 
7.61 
8.64 
6.94 

11.14 

27.38 
6.38 

10.85 
6.38 
7.24 
7.67 
9.15 

11.27 
8.76 
7.87 
9.39 
7.04 

12.70 
9.09 

19.45 

27.86 
1.91 

13.33 
2.65 
8.42 

8.35 



26.94 
6.53 



Total. 



).6l 
71.12 
72.17 
69.05 
51.46 
53.63 
54.26 
85.70 
47.74 
52.14 
49.14 
53.93 
62.77 
47.65 
47.66 
49.14 
51.82 
52.36 
54.46 
54.78 
55.90 
53.96 
61.96 
50.54 
58.18 
58.06 
136.54 
205.53 
13.81 
56.58 
22.04 
52.45 

62.39 



295.33 
21.34 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



227 



Table 4. — Annual Cost of Maintaining the Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OP YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid 
for maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 
Member- 
ship. 


From School Appro- 
priation. 


sum Spent under Direction of 
City Government. 




Year. 


Instruction 
and Super- 
vision. 


School 
Supplies. 


Light. 


Heating. 


Janitors. 


School 
Tele- 
phones. 


Total. 


1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 


11,710 
11,856 
12,320 
12,903 
13,191 
12,770 
12,656 
12,733 
12,836 
13,3^6 
14,109 
14,308 
14,544 
14,699 


$306,709 
320,744 
338,587 
357,581 
363,948 
376,138 
410,589 
437,730 
613,294 
714,859 
747,905 
752,272 
769,773 
790,963 


$30,319 
25,877 
26,843 
29,389 
26,098 
29,221 
33,587 
33,225 
40,079 
26,329 
42,682 
44,106 
52,757 
45,259 


$5,995 

5,842 

6,448 

5,755 

6,233 

5,429 

6,966 

8,821 

10,092 

12,163 

10,531 

9,883 

9,803 

12,226 


$15,676 
16,055 
18,952 
18,366 
20,197 
25,487 
35,839 
22,960 
37,083 
63,017 
26,521 
64,726 
34,162 
41,846 


$30,219 
32,939 
33,711 
32,674 
34,667 
35,718 
42,063 
55,710 
56,381 
61,435 
61,987 
63,408 
67,277 
73,967 


$512 
542 
624 
213 


$389,431 
402,0921 
425,165 
443,978 
451,143 


1917 




471,993 


1918 
1919 


18 


529,062 
*559,328 


1920 




*757,679 


1921 
1922 




*878,153 
♦889,877 


1923 




934,395 


1924 




933,772 


1925 




964,261 









t $92.50 included for rental of church for schoolhouse purposes in Ward 7. 

* Includes $882.50, rent of Armory, in 1919. 

* " 750.00. " . in 1920. 

* " S50.00, " , in 1921 

* " 250.00, " . in 1922. 



Table 5. — Annual Cost Per Capita of Maintaining Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

[Based on the average membership.] 















Ratio of 




Instruction 


School 


Janitors. 




Assessors' 


Cost of 


Year. 


and 


Supply 


Heat and 


Total. 


Valuation 


School Main- 




Supervision. 


Expenses. 


Light. 




of City. 


tenance to 
Valuation. 


1912 


$23 61 


$2 12 


$3 99 


$29 72 


$69,632,540 


$ .00556 


1913 


24 54 


1 91 


4 18 


30 63 


71,848,811 


.00559 


1914 


24 55 


1 89 


4 27 


30 71 


74,887,800 


.00568 


1915 


24 90 


2 03 


3 92 


30 85 


77,153,500 


.00575 


1916 


26 25 


1 88 


4 41 


32 54 


79,304,329 


.00569 


1917 


26 72 


2 05 


4 61 


33 38 


78,921,472 


.00595 


1918 


29 58 


2 40 


6 09 


38 07 


84,639,280 


.00625 


1919 


31 82 


2 45 


6 43 


40 70 


87,353,424 


.00643 


1920 


44 34 


2 80 


7 45 


54 59 


83,910,855 


.00903 


1921 


50 07 


1 60 


9 62 


61 29 


86,718,290 


.01012 


1922 


50 90 


2 77 


6 73 


60 40 


88,158,139 


.01009 


1923 


50 39 


2 85 


9 24 


62 48 


92,519,400 


.01010 


1924 


51 21 


3 34 


7 39 


61 94 


99,311,000 


.00940 


1925 


51 25 


2 79 


8 35 


62 39 


104,769,800 


.00920 



228 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 6. — Amount Spent Annually for all School Purposes. 

FOB A SERIES OF YEAES. 





For New 


For Repairs and 


For Maintaining 


Amount Spent 


Year. 


Schoolhouses. 


Permanent 


Schools. 


for all 






Improvements. 




School Purposes 


1912 


$35,527 


$14,163 


$389,431 


$439,121 


1913 


34,866 


19,341 


402,092 


456,299 


1914 


120,913 


19,700 


425,165 


565,778 


1915 


9,745 


28,212 


443,978 


481,935 


1916 


81,184 


21,634 


451,143 


553,961 


1917 


94,420 


27,283 


471,993 


593,696 


1918 


100,177 


30,126 


529,062 


659,365 


1919 


104,067 


20,492 


559,328 


683,887 


1920 


200 


44,286 


757,679 


802,165 


1921 


3,285 


39,573 


878,153 


921,011 


1922 


7,576 


36,629 


889,877 


934,082 


1923 


588,302 


63,052 


934,395 


1,585,749 


1924 


289,938 


57,593 


933,772 


1,281,303 


1925 


18,663 


45,848 


964,261 


1,028,773 



For years prior to 1912 


see School Report of 1917. 








TABLE 7. 


—POPULATION 


AND SCHOOL CENSUS 








FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1924-25 






1842 . 


1,013 


1901 . 


. 63,000 




1913 . 


81,000 


1850 . 


3,540 


1902 




65,273 




1914 . 


85,000 


1860 . 


8,025 


1903 




67,500 




1915 . 


86,854 


1865 . 


9,366 


1905 




69,272 




1916 . 


88,000 


1870 . 


14,693 


1906 




70,875 




1917 . 


90,000 


1875 . . 


21,594 


1907 . 




72,000 




1918 . , 


91,000 


1880 . 


24,985 


1908 




. 75,500 




1919 . 


91,500 


1885 . 


29,992 


1909 . 




75,500 




1920 . 


93,033 


1890 . 


40,117 


1910 




77,236 




1921 . 


94,500 


1895 . . 


52,200 


1911 . 




78,000 




1922 . . 


98,000 


1900 . 


61,643 


1912 




, 80,000 




1923 . 


99,000 












1924 . 


100,440 












1925 . 


, 99,032 






School 


Census 








Number o 


C children between 5 and 1 


5 years of 


age, 


inclusive, 




April 


1, 1925 . 










17,591 



School Registration 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, inclusive, 
April 1, 1925: — 

In public schools 

In private schools 

Total 

Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 13 inclusive: — 

In public schools, males 4,670 

females 4,638 



In private schools, males .. 
females 



1,347 
1,360 



13,289 
3,595 

16,884 



9,308 
2,707 



Total 



12,015 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



229 



Table 8. — Attendance of the Public Schools for the School Year 

1924-1925 



0) 

M 

^2 

CO GO 

oo o 

a§ 

2 °° 

5 



72 

35 

32 

38 

20 

10 

11 

5 

10 

6 

12 

4 

3 

14 

8 

16 

15 

11 

8 

4 

8 

10 
7 
21 
4 
8 
4 
1 



401 

403 



Schools. 



High 

Northeastern Jr. High 

Southern Jr. High 

Western Jr. High 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Boys' Vocational 

Continuation 

Total 

Total for 1923-24 



Annual 
Enrollment. 


p. 

cp"d 

IS m 


Average 
Attendance. 


Per cent, of 
Attendance. 


No. Attending 
in October. 


2,229 


2,046 


1,894 


92.7 


2,166 


1,478 
1,173 


1,365 
1,062 


1,284 
987 


94.1 

92.9 


1,415 
1,114 


1,187 
905 


1,139 

787 


1,077 

727 


94.5 
92.4 


1,150 
799 


442 


401 


368 


91.8 


405 


480 


464 


442 


95.3 


465 


216 


142 


130 


91.6 


.181 


502 


444 


419 


94.4 


431 


290 


269 


245 


91.2 


264 


540 


501 


466 


93.2 


487 


206 


171 


158 


92.0 


176 


149 


127 


119 


92.7 


133 


683 


603 


563 


93.3 


624 


344 


335 


308 


92.1 


307 


755 


688 


641 


93.2 


696 


656 


589 


555 


94.2 


588 


497 


457 


429 


93.9 


462 


341 


314 


294 


93.8 


324 


187 


169 


158 


93.5 


175 


335 


310 


284 


91.6 


306 


414 


392 


368 


93.8 


390 


314 


278 


264 


94.8 


281 


965 


876 


804 


91.8 


874 


183 


150 


141 


94.0 


163 


323 


299 


274 


91.6 


302 


60 


58 


53 


91.4 


56 


12 


10 


10 


92.5 


12 


111 


84 


80 


96.0 


79 


285 

16,262 
16,092 


169 


149 
13,691 


88.3 
93.1 


134 

14,959 
14,797 


14,699 
14,554 


13,647 


93.8 



6* 

fl el 
6 



1.953 

1,286 

1,009 

1,101 

765 

388 

456 

• 175 

453 

265 

502 

168 

123 

594 

340 

684 

589 

448 

314 

166 

308 

394 

281 

854 

152 

308 

55 

10 

69 

150 



14,360 
14,265 



230 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Table 9. — Statistics of High School for School Year 

September 10, 1924 to June 25, 1925 

Number of teachers, including Head Master 74 

Number of days school kept 181 

Number enrolled 2,229 

Average number belonging 2,046.5 

Average daily attendance 1,894 

Tardinesses 5,531 

Dismissals 624 

In Class of 1927, September 989 

June 834 

Per cent of loss 15.7 

In Class of 1926, September 627 

June 578 

Per cent of loss 7.8 

In Class of 1925, September 542 

June 525 

Per cent of loss 3.1 

Special Students, September 20 

June 16 

Per cent of loss 20. 

Total, September 2,166 

June 1,953 

Per cent of loss 9.8 

Number of graduates, male 231 

Number of graduates, female 295 

Total 526 

Average age, male graduates 18 yrs. mos. 

Average age, female graduates 18 yrs. mos. 

Number entering college 87 

Number of graduates entering scientific schools • 48 

Number of graduates entering normal schools 28 

Cost of instruction $151,743 45 

Cost of supplies 12,048 17 

Total cost $163,791 60 

Per capita cost of instruction 74 16 

Per capita cost of supplies 5 89 

Total cost per capita $80 05- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



231 



Table 10. — Pupils by Grades, June, 1925. 





School. 


Grade. 


Teachers. 




Pupils. 




-a 

eg 




Men. 


Women. 


O 

pq 


12 

'6 




H 


o 

OB. 






be 


a 

an 

< 






High 

Junior High 
Elementary 

Kindergarten 


Special 








7 
230 
247 
416 


9 
295 
331 
418 


16 
525 
578 
834 






Twelfth 












Eleventh 












Tenth 












Total 












19 


55 




900 


1,053 


1,953 






Ninth 












506 
558 
570 


560 
572 
630 


1,066 
1,130 
1,200 






Eighth 












Seventh 












Total 












18 


100 




1,634 


1,762 


3,396 






Sixth 








32 
35 
35 
36 
35 
35 




602 
733 
682 
715 
737 
760 


638 
752 
660 
706 
704 
724 


1,240 
1,485 
1,342 
1,421 
1,441 
1,484 






Fifth 










Fourth 




1 
1 
1 
1 






Third 








Second 








First 




1,411" 




Total 








8 


208 


4 


4,229 


4,184 


8,413 






Special 






3 


7 

6 

1 

11 

4 


7 


152 


162 


314 
















Sight Saving 




6 


4 


10 






Cadets 


1 








Atypical 




33 
69 


22 


55 

69 






Boys' Vocational... 
Independent 

Household Arts 
Continuation 


8 








1 

1 
2 










3 




95 


55 


150 






Americanization ... 




















Grand Total 


60 


396 


11 


7,118 


7,242 


14,360 











ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 11. — Pupils in High, Junior High, Elementary, Vocational, and 
Continuation Schools, 1924-1925. 





.c o 

byO 
02 


Junior 

High 

Schools. 


Elementary 
Schools. 


Kinder- 
gartens. 


Vocational 

School 

for Boys. 


c3 en 
■1° 

a o 

"lew 


Sight 
Saving 


Continuation 
School 


Total. 


Annual enrollment 


2229 
2046 
1894 
92.7 
4531 
624 
2166 
1953 


3838 
3566 
3348 
93.9 
2422 
1483 
3679 
3396 
1 


9350 
8441 
7870 
93.2 
4412 
2342 
8493 
8413 
51 


377 
325 
287 
88.3 
80 
2 
340 
314 


Ill 

84 

80 

96.0 

163 
51 
79 
69 


60 
58 
53 
91.4 
78 

8 
56 
55 

1 


12 
10 
10 
92.5 
11 
3 
12 
10 


285 
169 
149 
8H.3 
117 
1 
134 
150 


16,262 


Average membership 


14,699 


Average attendance 


13.691 


Per cent, of attendance 


93. L 


Number cases of tardiness 


11,814 


Number cases of dismissal 


4.514 


Membership, October, 1924 


14,959 


Membership, June, 1925 


14.360 


No. cases corp. punishment 


53 



Table 12. — Number of Pupils Admitted to Grade 1 in September 



School. 



Prescott ... 
Hanscom . 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

•Glines 

Forster .... 
Bingham.. 

♦Carr 

Morse 

Proctor .... 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Total . 



1921 



78 
78 

117 
26 
74 
37 
79 
48 
53 
79 
25 
91 
74 
69 
42 
37 
58 
72 

168 
32 
79 



1,416 



1922 



87 
114 
74 
35 
45 
48 
89 
50 
43 
94 
32 
106 
66 
74 
44 
37 
83 
68 
120 
44 
61 



1,414 



1923 



82 
83 
89 
35 
40 
32 
86 
41 
40 

104 
33 
95 

113 
72 
36 
46 
76 
63 

129 
33 
69 



1,397 



1924 



75 
83 
80 
41 
45 
33 
77 
42 
38 

100 
64 

112 
72 
88 
41 
40 
84 
54 

129 
47 
66 



1,411 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



233 



Table 13. — Eighth Grade Promotions 

1925 



Junior High Schools — June, 



Promotion from the eighth grade to the ninth grade in 
the Junior High School corresponds to the promotion from 
the last grade of a grammar school to the High School. 



Softool 



Northeastern Jr. High School 
Southern Junior High School.. 
Western Junior High School .. 



Total 



on 


o 


•n 


+J 


a 


X} 


o 


<D 


.2 3 

©'-a 


O 


£» 


CUTS 


S" ,H 


55 


3 

448 


S 5 


411 


302 


273 


404 


391 


1154 


1075 



3 



396 
241 
362 



60 t» 

'So 

® CD 



fc 



999 



16 
21 



42 



M 




co 


S-i 




o 


o 


-a 


O 


j£ 


cu 


K>" — c j 


o 


o3 
O 

O 


.S.3 ' 


bO 


J 


u o i 


S3 




<DCC 








o 


o 


^ 3 


O 


fc 


6 


6 


6-2 


£ 


fc 


^■^ 


7 








14 


1 





5 


2 


1 


26 


3 


1 



v 2 

xj-3 
G bo 

B Q-^ 

°^5 



Table 13A. — Ninth 



Grade Promotions 

1925 



Junior High Schools — June, 



Promotion from the ninth grade to the tenth is the pro- 
motion from the Junior High School to the Senior High 
School. The tenth grade corresponds to the second year of 
a four year High School. 











.a 

3 


M 




oo O 










CU 


Ph 




>>o 




c/> 


o 


bo 




O 


-3 


OJ3 










w - 




CD 


23 o 




o 


T3~ 

CD o 


bo"* 

O) 


fl o ? 


o 


a3 


bo 


School 


B 


yJ§ 




•r-c.c 


bo 


_J 


'C a 




u 0) 

o> 3 


occ 


01 > 


S3 M t. 


'5 


49 

o 


2 ° 




■2 3 

B^ 


^"S, 


*£.§ 


W_£d 


O 


(z; 


* O 




3 3 


gw 


o ° ° 
£cecc 

306 


1 No 

o 1 ot 
1 lie 


o 







Northeastern Junior High 


395 


377 


20 


51 





Southern " 


334 
357 


313 
349 


258 
302 


13 
24 


27 
21 


14 
1 


1 


Western " 


1 






Total 


1086 


1039 


866 i 37 


68 


66 


2 



234 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 14. — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance Department for 

the School Year 1924-1925 



1924 1925 Change 

Number of visits to the schools 429 392 — 37 

Number of visits to the homes 989 1,188 -f 199 

Number of cases investigated 1,083 1,271 +188 

Number of cases found to be truan- 
cy or absenteeism 296 352 +56 

Number of different pupils who were 

truants or habitual absentees 237 261 -(-24 

Number who were truants for the 

first time 187 207 +20 

Number who were truants for the 

second time 35 39 +4 

Number who were truants for three 

or more times 7 15 -f 8 

Number of girls who were truants 
or absentees 55 62 +7 

Number of visits to mercantile or 

manufacturing establishments 32 22 — 10" 

Number of minors found to be work- 
ing without employment cer- 
tificates 24 22 —2 

Number of employment certificates 

issued to boys 256 418 +162 

Number of employment certificates 

reissued to boys 128 118 —10 

Number of employment certificates 

issued to girls 107 134 +27 

Number of employment certificates 

reissued to girls 37 47 +10 

Number of educational literate cer- 
tificates issued to minors over 16 
years of age (first issue) 1,852 2,040 +188 

Number of newspaper licenses is- 
sued to boys 12 to 16 years of age 45 33 — 12 

Number of transfer cards investi- 
gated 2,200 2,296 +96 

Number of transfer cards forwarded 1,403 1,546 +143 

Number of truants in the County 
Training school at the close of 
the year 6 9 +3 

Amount paid for board of truants $860.28 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



235 



Table 14. — (Concluded) — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance 
Department for the School Year 1924-1925 



Disposition of truancy and habitual absentee cases: — 

Warned and returned to school 127 

Transferred to other schools 16 

Obtained certificates (14 to 16 years) 28 

Left school (over 16 years) 19 

Removed from city 35 

Brought before court and returned to school 11 

Brought before court and sent to Training School 8 

Returned to Training School (violating parole) 1 

Sent to Lyman School 7 

Sent to Shirley 4 

Sent to House of Good Shepherd 2 

Sent to Industrial School for Girls 2 

Sent to Waverley 1 

261 



Table 14-a. — Truancies and Habitual Absenteeism by Ages and Grades. 











BY AGES. 












Grades. 






















Total. 






















16 or 






6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


Over 




I 


3 


5 

4 


5 
5 

7 


1 

2 
2 


1 

2 
7 


1 
6 


2 
3 




1 


1 




14 


II 


10 


Ill 




15 


IV 






19 


V 










4 


10 


6 


2 


1 


3 




26 


VI 












3 


8 


9 


7 


6 




33 


VII 












1 


3 


16 


17 


6 


1 


44 


VIII 
















8 


14 


12 




34 


IX 


















8 


8 


2 


18 


X 


















2 


3 


6 


11 


XI 






















5 


5 


XII 


























Voc. 1 


















3 






3 


Voc. 2 


























Ungraded .. 






2 


1 












1 




4 


Special 








2 




2 




1 


1 






6 


Contin't'n 


















10 


9 




19 


Total 


3 


9 


19 


8 


14 


23 


22 


36 


64 


49 


14 


261 



236 ANNUAL RETORTS 

Table 15. — Evening High School — Season 1924-1925 

Male Female Total 

Enrolled 499 478 977 

Average membership 305 237 542 

Average attendance 217 175 392 

Number of teachers 22 

Number of sessions 57 

Cost of Instruction $5,566 00 

Cost of janitor, fuel, light 

and supplies 1,595 69 

Total cost $7,161 69 

Cost per pupil per evening .... $0,232 

Average attendance: October, 581; November, 464; December, 412; 
January, 285; February, 278; March, 269. 



Table 15.-A. — Evening Elementary Schools — Season 1924-1925 



Enrolled 






Male 
99 
80 
60 


Female 
39 
28 
21 
6 
73 
$1,509 00 

474 80 


Total 
138 


Average membership 






198 


Average attendance 

Number of teachers 
Number of sessions ... 






81 


Cost of instructior 
Cost of janitor, 
and supplies 


i 

fuel, 


light, 






evening 




Total Cost , 
Cost per pupil per 


$1,983 80 
$0 251 





Table 15^B. — Evening Vocational Classes — Season 1924-1925 



Women 

Enrolled 251 

Average membership 149 

Average attendance 134 

Number of teachers 10 

Number of sessions 38 

Cost of instruction 1,726 75 

Cost of janitors, fuel, light, and supplies 182 44 

Total expenditure $1,909 19 

Income from sources other than local taxation 228 46 

Net expenditure $1,680 73 

Reimbursement from State 829 65 

Net cost 851 08 

Net cost per pupil per evening $0 150 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



237 



Table 15-C. — Americanization Classes — Season 1924-1925 



Enrolled 

Average membership 

Average attendance 

Number of classes 

Number of teachers 

Number of sessions 

Membership hours 

Cost of instruction 

Cost of supplies 

Total cost 

Reimbursement from the 
State 

Net cost 

Net cost per membership hour 



Male Female 


Total 


337 213 


550 


215 143 


358 


165 119 


284 


21 




12 




70 




39,684 




$6,918 14 




71 29 





$6,989 43 
$3,494 71 

$3,494 72 

$0 088 



238 ANNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 16. — Promotions from Elementary to Junior High Schools. 





1921 1922 1923 


1924 1925 


Preseott 




178 








Bennett 




4 






Knapp 


83 j 91 132 


161 177 


Perry 


39 










Pope 136 129 136 


88 91 


Edgerly 


171 168 157 


189 






Glines 


94 91 90 


1 
95 82 ; 


Forster 


29 35 29 


40 41 


Bingham 


95 87 78 


i i 

87 90 

1 


Carr 


113 142 118 


138 136 


Morse 43 68 58 


68 54 


iProctor 


44 53 64 


59 55 


:Brown 


43 69 73 


44 43 


Highland 


155 161 156 


129 112 


Cutler 


115 154 147 


146 137 


Total 1160 1248 1238 


1244 1224 


Average 
Membership 
of Elementary 
Schools 


8270 8268 8347 


8878 8766 


Per cent of 
Average 
Membership 
'Promoted 


■ 14.03 ! 15.09 14.83 


14.02 13.96 



SCE-tOOL DEPARTMENT 



2M 



Table 17. — Attendance Statistics. 

FOR A SERIK3 OF YEAR8. 







Average 


Average 


Per cent, of 


Number of 


Ratio of 
Tardiness 


June 


Enrollment 


Membership 


Attendance 


Attendance 


Tardi- 
nesses 


to Average 
Attendance 


1912 


13,272 


11,710 


11,083 


94.6 


6,307 


0.569 


1913 


13,491 


11,903 


11,216 


94.2 


7,354 


0.655 


1914 


13,932 


12,320 


11,610 


94.2 


7,380 


0.635 


1915 


14,505 


12,903 


12,189 


94.5 


8,000 


0.656 


1916 


14,647 


13,191 


12,323 


93.4 


9,373 


0.761 


1917 


13,967 


12,770 


11,933 


93.7 


7,325 


0.613 


1918 


14,256 


12,656 


11,798 


93.2 


8,970 


0.760 


1919 


14,039 


12,733 


11,609 


91.2 


9,744 


0.839 


1920 


14,091 


12,836 


11,807 


91.9 


11,628 


0.993 


1921 


14,500 


13,396 


12,533 


93.6 


11,337 


0.904 


1922 


15,225 


14,004 


13,160 


94.0 


11,620 


0.883 


1923 


15,932 


14,308 


13,276 


92.8 


13,164 


0.991 


1924 


16,092 


14,554 


13,647 


93.8 


12,528 


0.918 


1925 


16,262 


14,699 


13,691 


93.1 


11.814 


0.863 



Table 18. — Membership, Etc., of High School. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


Average 
Membership 
all Schools. 


Largest 
Number in 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


Number of 
Graduates of 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


1912 


11,710 


2,023 


17.28 


296 


2.53 


1913 


11,903 


2,081 


17.48 


296 


2.48 


1914 


11,610 


2,111 


18.18 


273 


2.35 


1915 


12,903 


2,258 


17.50 


311 


2.41 


1916 


13,191 


2,288 


17.35 


348 


2.64 


1917 


12,770 


1,973 


15.45 


340 


2.66 


1918 


12,656 


1,520 


12.01 


332 


2.62 


1919 


12,733 


1,854 


14.56 


310 


2.43 


1920 


12,836 


1,714 


13.35 


241 


1.87 


1921 


13,396 


1,762 


13.15 


316 


2.36 


1922 


14,004 


2,037 


14.55 


613 


4.38 


1923 


14,308 


2,061 


14.40 


419 


2.93 


1924 


14,554 


2,104 


1 4.45 


497 


3.41 


1925 


14,699 


2,229 


15.16 


524 


3.56 



For years prior to 1912 see School Reoort of 1917. 



240 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 19. — Promotions for School Year Ending Ju«ne 25, 1925 
Junior High Schools. 



Grade. 


§•2 
^° 

Ol 


Unconditionally 
Promoted to 
Next Grade 


2' c 

an 


<v 
© 


2 * 

a s 
•5° 


O be 

J-. 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 

after Two 
Months' Trial 


I 


1,214 


1,033 


100 


78 


3 




3 


II 


1,154 


936 


136 


81 


1 




1 


III 


1,086 


909 


127 


50 






3 


Total 


3,454 


2,878 


363 


209 


4 




7 







Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 25, 1925 

Junior High Schools. 



Grade. 


CO 

as 

D O 

a ° 

cS 

o 


conditionally 
romoted to 
^ext Grade 


2' E 

an 

£fl 


T3 
3 

P4 


omoted more 
n One Grade 


•4 

O * 

IS 

G o 


Promotees 
ropped Back 
after Two 
onths' Trial 




Fh 


go,- 






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O S 












■*-> 


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I 


100 


85.1 


8.2 


6.5 


0.2 




0.2 


II 


100 


81.1 


11.8 


7.0 


0.1 




0.1 


III 


100 


83.7 


11.7 


4,6 






0.2 


Average 


100 


83.3 


10.6 


6.0 


0.1 




0.2 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



241 



Table 19A. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 25, 1925 

Elementary Grades 



Grade. 


C C 
O o 

►■933 

fi 

OB 



u 

Ph 


Unconditionally 

Promoted 
to next Grade. 


H 


-c 

03 



s 


H 


+-> 

K 


03 6 

n 

CD CD 

1° 

s 

^5 


, ^ 

6 «* 

S^ 

Ph B 
p— i"fl 

QJ 03 

OB 
W O 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 

after Three 
Months' Trial. 


I 

II 
III 
IV 
V 
VI 


1,553 
1,421 
1,433 
1,356 
1,457 
1,259 


1,239 
1,220 
1,251 
1,173 
1,202 
1,110 


75 
68 
97 
93 
173 
110 


219 

128 
74 
76 
73 
29 


20 
5 

11 

14 
9 

10 


5 


2 
8 

13 
2 


Total 


8,479 


7,195 


616 


599 


69 


5 


25 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 25, 1925 

Elementary Grades 



Grade. 


03 

B 

s 

og 



u 

Ph 


Unconditionally 

Promoted 
to next Grade. 


Promoted 
on Trial. 


Retarded. 


Promoted more 
than One Grade. 


§1 

Ph B 

■g-o 

CD 03 

O.B 
GO O 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 

after Three 
Months' Trial. 


I 

II 
III 
IV 

V 
VI 


100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


79.7 

85.8 
87.3 
86.5 
82.5 
88.2 


4.8 
4.8 
6.8 
6.9 
11.9 
8.7 


14.1 
9.0 
5.1 
5.6 
5.0 
2.3 


1.3 

0.4 
0.8 
1.0 
0.6 
0.8 


0.3 


0.1 
0.5 

0.9 
0.1 


Average... 


100 


85.0 


7.3 


6.9 


0.8 


0.06 


0.4 



242 



ANNUAL REPORTS 






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SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



247 



Table 22. — Leave of Absence of Teachers 

Marion Allen, from March 1 to end of school year, June 30, 1925. 

Berta M. Burnett, for one year ending June 30, 1926. 

Helen E. Harrington, for month of June 1925. 

Mary E. Keefe, for two months beginning September 1, 1925. 

Eleanor W. Nolan, from the middle of March 1925 to May 4, 1925. 

Cornelia D. Pratt, for school year ending June 30, 1926. 

Julia M. Riordan, for remainder of school year from May 25, 1925. 



Cadets 



Elizabeth D. Armstrong 
H. Beatrice Bingham 
Gertrude M. Chapin 
William Crotty 
Jane Ann Doyle 
Grace M. Henchey 



Anna E. Keating 
Helen Keefe 
Dorothy Levy 
Katherine T. Lombard 
Mary E. McCarthy 
Catherine M. Scanlan 



Table 23. — Transfers of Teachers 



E. 



Teacher 
Bella Weisman 



Helen C. Jackson 
Mary A. Hickey 
Hortense F. Small 
Margaret McCarthy 
Dorothy C. Huddy 
Eliza I. Patterson 
Mary E. Keefe 
Ethel H. Werner 



From 



High 



Northeastern Jr. 

Northeastern Jr. 

Cutler 

Baxter 

Hanscom 

Proctor 

Perry 

Forster 



To 
Director, Thrift 

struction 
High 
High 

Southern Jr. 
Perry 
Highland' 
Cutler 
Knapp 
Hanscom 



In- 



Table 24. — Number of Teachers. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


High 
School. 


Junior 

High 

Schools. 


Elemen- 
tary 
Schools. 


Special 
Teach- 
ers. 


1912 


66} 
68} 




252* 

257* 


22 

28 


1913 




1914 


75} 
76} 




266* 

272* 


30 
31 


1915 




1916 


77} 




290* 


30 


1917 


70} 


65 


288* 


33 


1918 


70} 


108 


207* 


28 


1919 


70° 


106 


207* 


26 


1920 


69° 


113 


212* 


23 


1921 


75° 


115 


216t 


25 


1922 


72} 


114 


216t 


22 


1923 


75° 


120 


222t 


24 


1924 


76° 


117 


221t 


24 


1925 


76° 


118 


229t 


23 



Assistants 
not in 

Charge of 
Room. 



9 

12 

20 

15 

15 

17 

5 

9 

8 

14 
16 
18 
16 
16 



a 


s 


Men. 


Women 


o 


< 








40 
39 
44 
45 


309 
326 
347 
349 


















46 
49 
49 
48 
54 
60 


366 
374 
369 
370 
371 
392 


















5 


2 


5 


2 


57 


390 


4 


2 


55 


410 


4 


2 


59 


401 


4 


2 


59 


409 



Jlncluding a secretary. *Including four kindergartners. 

tlncluding seven kindergartners. 

olncludmg a secretary and a matron 



Total. 



349 
365 
391 
394 
412 
423 
418 
418 
425 
452 
447 
465 
460 
468 



248 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Table 25— BOOKS AUTHORIZED FOR USE, 1925 

For High Schools 
As Text Books: — 

SCIENCE BOOKS 

Chemistry for Boys and Girls, Greer and Bennett — Allyn and 
Bacon. Practical Physics, Black and Davis — The Macmillan 
Company. Laboratory Experiments in Practical Physics, N. 
H. Black — The Macmillan Company. Elementary Principles 
of Physics, Fuller, Brownlee and Baker — Allyn and Bacon. 
Laboratory Exercises in Physics, Fuller and Brownlee — Allyn 
and Bacon. 

ENGLISH 

Representative British Poetry, Keyes — C. E. Merrill Company. 
Short Plays of Various Types, Smith — C. E. Merrill Company. 
A History of English and American Literature, Hinchman — 
The Century Company. Contemporary Verse, Merrill and 
Sprague — Little, Brown and Company. 

SPANISH 

Leyendas Espanolas, Sanchez Perez — Allyn and Bacon. Spanish 
Life, Allen and Castillo — Henry Holt and Company. Corres- 
pondent Commercial, Luria — Silver, Burdett and Company. 
Lecturas Elementales, Luria — The Macmillan Company. His- 
toria De Espana, Romera-Navarro, — D. C. Heath and Company. 

COMMERCIAL 

Business Law, Babb — The Ronald Press Company. Bookkeeping 
and Accounting and Teacher's Manual, McKinsey — South- 
western Publishing Company. 

Fop Junior High Schools 
As Text Books: — 

History of Our Country, Halleck, American Book Company. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Human Geography, Book II, Smith — The John C. Winston Com- 
pany. 

COMMERCIAL 

Elementary American History and Government, Woodburn and 
Moran — Longmans, Green and Company. 

For Elementary Schools 
As Text Books: — 

Elementary English, Spoken and Written, Hodge and Lee. 
Elementary Book for grades 3 and 4. 

Intermediate Book for grades 5 and 6, Charles E. Merrill Com- 
pany. 
Essentials of English, Pearson and Kirchwey. 
Book I, Lower grades 
Book II, Middle grades 

American Book Company. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 249 

Table 26.— HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

The graduation exercises of the High School occurred 
Thursday, June 18, 1925. 



DR. HARRY M. STOODLEY, Chairman of the School 
Committee, Presiding. 

1. OVERTURE — "Der Freischutz" von Weber 

High School Orchestra, LeRoy A. Anderson, Leader 

2. PRAYER— Rev. George E. Heath, D.D., 

Pastor College Avenue M. E. Church 

3. SINGING— "Hail to Old Glory"* Richardson 

Graduating Class 

4. CLASS ORATION— "Labor and Love" 

Thomas J. Kennedy, Jr. 

5. CELLO SOLO— "Meditation in C" Squire 

John H. Query 

6. SINGING— "Sea Fever" Henry K. Hadley 

Graduating Class 

7. ADDRESS TO GRADUATES 

James T. Williams, Jr. 
Editor Boston Evening American 

8. ORGAN SOLO— 

"Allegro Vivace," Second Sonata Guilmant' 

Carl C. Howard 

9. SELECTION — "Poet and Peasant" von Suppe 

High School Orchestra 

10. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO GIRLS 

11. SINGING— "Freedom Our Queen" Horatio Parker 

Graduating Class 

12. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO BOYS 

13. SINGING— "Class Ode" 

Graduating Class 

14. SELECTION— "Hungarian March" Liszt 

High School Orchestra 

Singing and Orchestra under the direction of James P. McVey, 
Supervisor of Music in the Public Schools. 



♦Words and Music by J. Howard Richardson 



250 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 
LIST OF GRADUATES 

JUNE, 1925 
♦Graduated with honor 



GIRLS 

♦Marguerite Burnham Abbott 
Edna Kent Abercrombie 
Regis Margaret Ahern 
Edith Craig Allison 
Ruth Elizabeth Anderson 
Phyllis Ardelle Applin 
Louisa Yolanda Arzillo 
Mildred Allan Ayers 
Violette Christena Babcock 
Ida Mary Bagni 
Ruth Emily Baird 
Catherine Barbara Baldwin 

♦Alice Catherine Mary Baratta 
Evelyn Nadine Bassett 
Elizabeth Frances Beane 
Hazel May Bearce 
Phyllis Warren Beatty 
Sylvia Emily Bellizia 
Esther Berger 
Evelyn Marie Berry 
Josephine Marie Biagioni 
Eleanor Teasdale Binford 
Evelyne Marie Blake 
Emma Malverne Boardman 
Mabel Prances Bond 
Violet Gladys Bond 
Vivian Frances Bond 
Gretchen Adelaide Bowers 
Kathrynn Frances Bradford 
Grace Marie Bratton 

♦Mabel Cecelia Breen 
Alice Viola Brock 
Alice Hazel Brooks 
Florence Louise Burk 
Edith Catherine Burke 
Frances Catherine Burton 
Doris Mabel Butman 
Clara Phyllis Butterfield 
Tasia Caffanges 
Elena Calamara 
Thelma Grace Calkin 
Mary Katherine Callahan 
Muriel Gladys Callow 
Blanche Mae Canavan 
Ina Elizabeth Cannon 
Julia Agnes Carey 
Erma Muriel Carman 



Katherine Belle Carter 

Ernestina Censullo 

Adeline Clark 

Muriel Helen Clark 

Leona Mae Clifford 

Gladys Arlene Coe 

Anna Marie Collins 

Thelma Withrow Colwell 

Helen Kimball Cook 

Emma Copithorne 

Lillian Mary Corrieri 
♦Ruth Annazetta Covert 

Marjorie Cross 

Margaret Mary Crowley 

Nora Mae Crowley 

Irene York Cummings 

Lillian Mary Dacey 

Esther Elizabeth Davis 

Irene Madeline DeBay 

Frances Marie Decost 

Dorothy Anastasia De Louchery 

Mary Edith Desmond 

Viola May Dibblee 

Angela Regina Di Cicco 

Evelyn Dill 

Anna Gertrude Dinan 

Agnes Mary Donahue 

Lovina Eleanor Donegan 

Mildred Elizabeth Doran 
♦Helen Gertrude Doucet 

Eleanore Bradford Drew 

Mary Eleanore Duggan 

Grace Louise Dunning 

Elisabeth Dorothea Easton 

Sarah Jocelyn Edgerly 

Doris Mae Edwardes 

Theodora Anna Eldredge 

Doris Emery 

Muriel Estes 

Helen Lucy Farnam 

Mary Fecas 

Rose Veronica Feeley 

Hazel Felt 

Thelma Jewel Ferguson 

Mary Louise Finigan 

Ruth Marie Finnin 

Esther Marion Fisher 

Anna Fishlin 

Alice Blanche Fitzgerald 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



251 



♦Margaret Frances Ford 

Winifred Marie Ford 

Mary Elizabeth Forrest 

Virginia Louise Foss 

Hazelle Clark Foster 

Mary Elizabeth Foster 

Thelma Shirley Foster 

Florence Alice Fowler 

Myrtle Viola Fralick 

Grace Frances Gaffney 

Rosemary Gallagher 

Helen Beatrice Galvin 

Rena Evelyn Gattoni 

Eleanor May Gay 

Dorothy Marie Geraghty 

Philomena Gianetta 

Irene Gilliatt 

Marion Christina Given 

Frances Goldenberg 

Celia Goldstein 

Sadie Lillian Goldstein 

Jeanette Miller Goodman 

Esther Helena Gostanian 

Florence Rose Griffin 

Mabel June Gunning 

Elizabeth Sarah Jane Gurney 

Mina Ulrica Haas 
♦Constance Rhodes Handy 
♦Eleanor Harmon 

Marie Adelaide Harney 

Sarah Edith Harrington 

Viola Gertrude Havican 

Dorothea Mable Hayes 

Mary Josephine Heafey 

Kathryn Elder Heater 

Catherine Gertrude Heiser 
♦Gladys Wilhelmina Herderhurst 

Vera Hillberg 

Edith Herman Hilton 

Margaret Louise Holden 

Alice Louise Holland 

Mary Helen Holloran 

Dorothy Martha Holmes 
♦Doris Houghton 

Ethel Coleman Howard 

Christena Irvine Hunter 

Ruth Agnes Hussey 
♦Evelyn Marion Hutchinson 

Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Gertrude Martha Jaycock 

Arshaloos Johnian 

Helen Eleanor Johnson 

Sigrid Elizabeth Johnson 

Estelle May Jones 

Helen Josephine Joyce 

Beatrice Minerva Kenny 

Nina Olive Killam 

Evelyn Mae Kinch 



Mildred Agatha King 

♦Natalie Bonsalle King 
Pauline King 
Sara Louise Kinneen 
Helen Knight 
Marion Lamb Knight 
Dorothy Edith Knox 
Concetta Frances Lauro 
Jennie Dorothea Lauro 
Nora Theresa Lawless 
Dorothy Alice Lee 
Margaret Veronica Lee 
Adele Levy 
Ruth Azalia Libby 
Etta Dorothy Lima 
Helen Rose Linnehan 
Florence Louise Lloyd 

♦Veda Elizabeth Lohnes 
Helena Church Lowe 
Elsa Hildegard Lundstrom 
Orpha Jane MacFadyen 
Esther Graham MacKenzie 
Annie Catherine MacKinnon; 
Isabelle Vivienne MacLean 
Edith Catherine MacPhail 
Gertrude Mary Maguire 
Sara Adaline Magwood 

♦Beatrice Ethelyn Mann 
Grace Kathryn Manning 
Edith Louise Manthorn 
Elsie Marchese 
Elinore Lyon Mattern 
Zoraida Mayrelles 
Edna Myrtle McCarthy 
Mildred Irene McCarthy 
Edna Mary McCully 
Margaret Virginia McKay 
Mary Velma McKinnon 
Isabel Agnes McMullen 

♦Claire McTiernan 
Anna Meaney 
Inez Manlia Milano 
Olive Beatrice Miller 
Gertrude Elise Millett 
Marguerite Mary Mollet 
Charlotte Louise Moody 
Margaret Mary Morgan 
Mary Helen Mornane 
Evelyn Mary Murphy 
Gertrude Gwendolyn Murphy 
Lillian Elizabeth Murray 
Esther Irene Newcombe 
Elsa Evelyn Nilson 
Sara Mary Nissenbaum 
Mildred Alice Nugent 
Ellen Catherine O'Donnell 
Anna Elizabeth O'Lalor 
Florence Marguerite O'Leary 



252 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Catherine Frances O'Neil 

Elva Lydia Elizabeth O'Neil 

Dorothy Prances O'Neill 

Eleanor Packard 

Delia Maron Patriquin 

Alice Elizabeth Siverina Pearson 

Emily Grace Pearson 

Mary Ellen Pendergast 

Priscilla Louise Pennock 

May Catherine Perron 
♦Elizabeth Louise Peterson 
*Ethel Demetrie Peterson 

Helen Isabel Pickard 

Alice Frances Powers 

Margaret Rosemary Puppo 

Thelma Kathleen Rawding 

Edythe Teresa Reynolds 

Evelyn Idella Rhodes 

Gladys Ella Rice 

Anna Roberts 

June Marie Rogers 

Florence Anna Rose 

Charlotte Dorothea Rosen 

Evelyn Gertrude Saunders 

Julia Rose Savani 

Mabel Irene Sawyer 

Bernice Leona Schelzel 

Mary Ruth Schofield 

Ruth Dearborn Schofield 
♦Dallas Lillian Seavey 

Elisabeth Marie Seckendorf 

Marjorie Seymour 

Ruth Shapiro 

Margaret Elizabeth Shea 

Anne Connell Sheridan 

Rosalyne Silbert 
♦Frances Elizabeth Simpson 

Ruth Eve Slotnick 

Gertrude Mae Smith 

Helen Gertrude Smith 

Marguerite Pamelia Smith 

Gladys Evelyn Snow 

Mildred Beatrice Joan Soderberg 

Lillian Rita Sousa 

Ruth Evelyn Sprague 

Ethel Anna Starck 

Blanche Beulah Sterling- 
Agnes Julia Sullivan 

Alice Gertrude Sullivan 

Doris Margaret Sumner 

Edythe Gertrude Sykes 

Ella Virginia Thornton 

Grace Elouise Thornton 

Marion Berneice Tooker 
♦Alice Jeanette Underwood 

Florence Evelyn Van Ummersen 

Lillian Esther Vergnani 

Cecilia Agnes Viveiros 



Marie Viadica 
Helen Louise Vorce 
Adelia Belle Voss 
Vera Leona Wakefield 
Helen Hay Wattie 
♦Ruth Catherine Wattie 
Alice May Watts 
Mildred Watts 
Esther Preble Way 
Edna Mae White 
Ethel Margaret White 
Ellen Marjorie Whitman 
Ruth Evangeline Whitmore 
Ruth Florence Whitney 
Harriet Gilrie Whittemore 
Myrtle Keating Wilcox 
Laura Gertrude Williams 
Annie Helen Wolfe 
Bertha Marguerite Wood 
Edith Winifred Wood 
Doris Jeanette Young 
Edith Catherine Young 
Ella Frances Young 
Rachel Young 
Evelyn Elizabeth Zink 



BOYS 

Charles Quincy Adams 
Cosmo Albani 
John Edward Amlaw 
Charles Theodore Anderson 
LeRoy Allen Anderson 
Frederick Gustavus Baker 
John Francis Bartlett 
Francis Leonard Beaver 
Donald Lawrence Belden 
John Arthur Bellamacina 
Hugo George Anthony Bellengi 
Forest Theodore Benton, Jr. 
Dante Arthur Bertolami 
George Russell Beyer 
Haskell Clark Billings 
George Herbert Birtwell 
Charles Hargraves Bliss 
Robert Francis Bloomer 
Edward Blumsack 
Lester Raymond Bowlby 
Walter Daniel Breen 
Paul Larkin Broderick 
Albert Francis Bryant, Jr. 
James Henry Buckley 
♦Harry George Burnett 
George Chester Byam 
Albert Francis Byrnes 
Frank Joseph Calandrella 
Frank Xavier Calandrella 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



253 



♦Clifton Robert Robinson Campbell 
Marvin Oswald Campbell 
Angelo Joseph Capone 
Robert James Cardillo 
Joseph Francis Carnes 
Dominic Carra 
Roy Martin Cheney 
George Adams Clark, Jr. 
Walter Lewis Clark 
Leslie Millen Cleaves 
Norman Hatherly Clements 
Ronald Wallace Coggeshall 
Francis St. Croix Cole 
John Lawrence Collins 
Edward William Conboy 
John Lewis Connolly 
James Leslie Corrigan 
James Edward Cotter 
George Vincent Cox 
Henry Francis Cox 
David Gordon Crockett 
Ralph Hoagland Crosby 
James Patrick Cnrtin 
Warren Joseph Curtin 
Arthur DaPrato 
Harvey Prescott Davis 
Harry Dickson 
*Karnig Stephen Dinjian 
Joseph Edward Doherty 
Warren Hughes Dolben 
John Joseph Donahue 
Leo Christopher Donahue 
James Francis Donegan 
Francis Xavier Donnelly 
Milton Huggett Duclos 
Thomas Bartlett Dudley 
♦Clarence Wesley Dupertuis 
Thurston Hambleton Edwards 
John Joseph Evans 
Arthur Faberman 
John Vincent Fannon 
Edward Francis Fenn 
Roy Joseph Ferretti 
Gordon Hubert Field 
Walter Henry Flett 
Donald Lamprey Fraser 
Albert William Fuchs 
Russell Elmer Gaskill 
Myron Cameron Gerrish 
Harold Mark Ernest Gillis 
Edmund Francis Giroux 
Curtis Edmund Goodwin 
Ralph George Gordon 
William Gardiner Goss 
Harlan Forest Grant 
Hugo Alexander Greco 
Alton Porter Greene 
George Robert Greene 



Leslie Hammond Griffin 
Thomas Alexander Griffin 
David Albert Hallington 
*Erwyn Henry Harriman 
Ralph Henry Hatfield 
Frederic Tapley Hawes 
Eugene Edmund Herlihy 
James Francis Hogan 
Winthrop Cleveland Horton 
Carl Chandler Howard 
Frederick Robert Hufton, Jr. 
Daniel Paul Hurley 
Clarence Frazer Ingalls 
Albert Edward Irving 
Charles Edward Jellison 
Edmund John Jellison 
James Joseph Jellison 
fFrank Leon Jones 
Harold Frederick Jones 
Nicholas Pericles Kachauui 
William Joseph Kane 
James Arthur Keefe 
John Joseph Keefe 
Norman Eugene Keene 
William Joseph Kelleher 
George Francis Kelley 
Arthur Nicholas Kelliher 
Charles Frederick Kelly 
Walter Leonard Kelson 
Thomas Joseph Kennedy, Jr. 
Matthew Harry Kerner 
Francis Ambrose Kingston 

Charles Henry Koechling 

Thomas Aquinas Koen 

Abraham Landa 

John Baptist LaTorraca 
"James Joseph Leahy 

Edwin Osgood Learned 

Edwin Francis Leary 

George Angelo Lenzi 

Thomas Joseph Leonard 

Tobias Levinson 

Howard Arthur Lincoln 

Dugald Livingstone 

Christopher Michael Lombard 

John Alfred Lowney 

Alfred John Lyons 

James Carter MacDonald 

Daniel Knowles MacFayden 

Miles Hugh MacMillan 

Paul James Maguire 

John Thomas Mahoney 

George Elbert Robert Malatesla 

Christopher Leo Manley 

Edgar Arthur Marble 

Charles George Martignetti 

George Arthur Mason 

William Massello 



254 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Ralph Joseph Mattola 
Albert Francis McAuliffe 
Lawrence James McCahey 
Edward Michael McCarty 
Paul McElroy 

Albert Christopher McGowan 
William Alfred LeRoy McGray 
Russell Winfield McKinley 
Arthur Francis McMahon 
John Francis McSweeney 
Hilton Frank Mears 
Louis Mellor 
Robert Arthur Mercer 

♦Charles Jacob Miers 
Keelan Samuel Milbury 
James Dennis Mohan 
Hugh Jerome Montague 
Thomas Joseph Montague 
Edmund Gillespie Moriarty 
Herbert Eli Morrill 
Hilary Joseph Morris, Jr. 
Aram Krikor Mbvsessian 
James Francis Murphy 
John Joseph Murphy 
Stanley Forsyth Murray 
Philip Aldrich Newton 
Herbert Augustin Nolan 
Carl Frederick Ogren 
Victor Emmanual Oliver, Jr. 
William Herbert Parker, Jr. 
Howard Woodman Pearce 
John Lincoln Perkins 
Russell Harding Perry 

*George Lexington Peterson 
John Lawrence Phalan 
Harry Marshall Prescott 
Louis Price 
Robert Stanley Pride 
Donald Trevor Pring 
John Edward Pynn 
John Henry Query 
John Joseph Quinn 



George Artemas Reed 

James Luther Reid 

Donald Lewis Remick 
*Edmund John Repetto 

William Frank Repetto 

Samuel Hercules Robinson 

Francis Linwood Rogers 

Philip Lowry Rusden 

Sarkis Sarkesian 

Francis Vincent Scanlan 

Leslie James Scott 

Frederick Oliver Sime 

Henry Joseph Skelly 

William Elliott Small 

Frank Pillman Smith 

John Robert Smith j 

Lawrence Beebe Smith 

Stanley Fitzson Snell 

Ewing Terry Spering 

John Edward Stafford 

Robert Shaw Stetson 

Earl Stanley Stewart 
*Bartlett Hicks Stoodley 
*Dean Cramer Swan, Jr. 

John Louis Taapken 

Martin John Tashjian 

Kenneth Hudson Taylor 

Arthur William Thibault 
*John Henry Tomfohrde 

George William Trask 

John Edward Twigg 

Richard Edward Emanuel Valente 

George Roger Van Iderstine 

Frank Xavier Veneri 

Richard Carter Warren 

David Herman Warsowe 

Joseph Bernard Weinberger 

Belvin Franklin Williston 

Edward Lowell Wisewell, Jr. 

Herbert George Worters 

Walter Harold Worth 

Nelson Wright 



Total number of graduates, 524; boys, 229; girls, 295. 
fDeceased 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



255 



Junior High School gradual 
buildings on June 22, 1925. 



occurre.l in the school 



LIST OF GRADUATES 
Northeastern 



GIRLS 

Jessie M. Alexander 
Marion Gladys Allen 
Julia A. Arata 
Helen Mae Arnold 
Grace Hazel Babino 
Henrietta M. Bagni 
Gertrude A. Bailey 
Mary E. Baldwin 
Grace Dorothea Ballou 
Elsie Ada Bell 
Mildred M. Bell 
Arline M. Benham 
Anna T. Bills 
Adela A. Bilodeau 
Gertrude Mary Bogan 
Edith M. Bolton 
Florence M. Bourke 
Edna Doris Bradshaw 
Margaret Victoria Brailsford 
Esther H. Brazier 
Helen Margaret Brenize 
Marjorie A. Brigham 
Eleanor V. Brown 
Sylvia May Brown 
Margaret S. Buckland 
Muriel Louise Burns 
Beatrice Frances Caezza 
Marguerite Enis Calderoni 
Ruth E. Cameron 
Eunice Bernadin Cannon 
Miriam Elizabeth Carnes 
Minnie Edna Carr 
Elizabeth Ellen Cassidy 
Julia Mabel Cecconi 
Helen E. Chiesa 
Carrie Ellen Chisholm 
Florence L. Chiuccarello 
Frances G. Clark 
Beatrice Cohen 
Marion Cohen 
Doris Mary Condon 
Mary T. Conley 
Marguerite May Connell 
Frances Elizabeth Connor 
Doris V. Conroy 
Marie Louise Conroy 
Phyllis Gertrude Cooper 
Elizabeth C. Cotter 
Dorothy Elizabeth Counihan 



Mildred Mary Counihan 
Flora C. Cox 
Margaret Cox 
Edith May Crawford 
Mary Agnes Crowley 
Constance Mary Curcio 
Carmella Dalio 
Ellen Marie Desmond 
Catherine A. Doherty 
Claire Grace Duffey 
Mildred C. Dunn 
Isabel Emma Dwyer 
Grace Elizabeth Edgerly 
Anna Elizabeth Engle 
Gloria Eleanor Falco 
Catherine E. Falvey 
Gertrude A. Farrell 
Ruth Eleanor Faulkner 
Marion Dorothea Ficca 
Elizabeth Forsyth 
Rita E. Francis 
Marion L. Ghiloni 
Teresa Maddeline Gigante 
Ruth Elizabeth Giroux 
Eleanor Hardwick Godfrey 
Ella Mae Goodwin 
Cecelia Martha Gordon 
Dorothy Harriet Gordon 
Alice E. Gowen 
Eleanor Graham 
Mary A. Graziano 
Arlene Frances Griffin 
Ethel Doris Griswold 
Mildred Doris Hall 
Margaret K. Harris 
Mary Ruth Hennessy 
Muriel M. Hight 
Virginia Luey Hill 
Virginia Jane Hoffses 
Marion Hoole 
Rebecca Hosmer 
Kathleen Teresa Hourihan 
Thelma M. Hughes 
Lauretta Gladys Hunber 
Agnes Josephine Jennings 
Adele F. Jollymore 
Lillian Eleanor Jones 
Margaret Henrietta Jordan 
Blanche E. Josselyn 
Estelle Rita Keaney 
Mary J. Kelley 



256 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Lillian Marie Kelly 
Rebecca Louise Kennard 
Angelina Marie Langone 
Ruth Elna Larson 
Ruth F. Latimer 
Ruth Jean Lawson 
Lydia Marie Lepone 
Frances Eva Lewis 
Helen Sophia Linden 
Helen Logue 
Rubena Mary Loring 
Kathleen Jacquline Lyons 
Lydia Adelaide Maclntyre 
Olive Beatrice MacPherson 
Rose Elizabeth Maggio 
Mary Catherine Mallett 
Dorothy Elinor Marble 
Edythe Mary Martinette 
Adelina L. Martini 
Violet Delina Mason 
Margaret Georgina McAuley 
Florence Mary McCarthy 
Eleanor Mary McColgan 
Gladys A. G. McPhee 
Ida E. Merrill 
Frances C. Meyer 
Addie Mary Milbury 
Catherine Mobilia 
Florence Veronica Mornane 
Bertha Adaline Nelson 
Lillian Frances Noyes 
Gertrude M. O'Brien 
Helen J. O'Brien 
Edrona Velma O'Neil 
Kathleen Marie Osborne 
Phyllis Beatrice Osborne 
Clementina Paliuca 
Ada Christena Patten 
Anna Albertha Pearson 
Annie Pietrella 
Mary Lillian Pineo 
Edith Rose Pinkham 
Alba F. Pirani 
Mary Quinlan 
M. Frances Reardon 
Adeline Margaret Reppucci 
Parmina Elizabeth Reppucci 
Mildred Rice 
Rita Eva Rinaldi 
Louise Whitman Robie 
Mary M. Robinson 
Agnes Claire Roche 
Gertrude Frances Rogan 
Alice Kathleen Roma 
Mary Jeannette Ronan 
Annie Roscoe 
Jennie B. Rudolph 
Marjorie L. Russ 



Hazel Esther Sanderson 
Olive E. Santarlasci 
Mildred L. Sargent 
Louise Marie Scabia 
Irene G. M. Schleicher 
Helen Rita Scully 
Dorothy Geneva Seymour 
Helen Frances Shea 
Mary Frances Shea 
Mary Willimina Simmons 
Ruth N. Simmons 
Edna May Singleton 
Ruby Bell Singleton 
Bella Slotnick 
Eunice Stella Smith 
Virginia Beal Smith 
Elizabeth T. Souther 
Crisantina Mary Storlazzi 
Lena M. Suffredini 
Anna M. Sullivan 
Margaret Anna Sullivan 
Josephine Julia Tarpey 
M. Eva Towle 
Marion Eleanor Travaglia 
Jennie Helen Trimboli 
Eleanor Raynor Trowbridge 
Dorothy D. Vincent 
Evelyn Lois Waldorf 
Ruth Betty Walker 
Dorothy Rose Weldon 
Hazel M. Whe'an 
Helen A. White 
Dorothy Janice Whitman 
Emma L. Wilson 
Dorothy P. Woodbury 
Norma E. Woodward 
Constance Louise Young 
Mary E. Zappelli 
Bernice M. Zarrella 



BOYS 

Raymond Joseph Aherne 
Albert Allen 
Eben Backstrom 
Edmund Balboni 
Edward Joseph Baldwin 
Eugene Albert Bates, Jr. 
Wilbur E. Beaudry 
Benjamin Becker 
John James Bellanco 
Gerald S. Berry 
Philip Berry 
Ralph D. Bingham 
Eugene Smith Blanchard 
Albert H. Blomen 
Joseph Blumsack 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



257 



Edmund James Bourke 

George Henry Bradford, Jr. 

Robert J. Brennan 

Fred P. Brown 

Richard Harry Bryant 

Chester A. Burt 

Nicholas Caffanges 

Allan D. Calder 

John Albert Carroll 

James J. Chiesa 

Benjamin Cohen 

Irving Cohen 

Raymond A. Colbert 

Gordon Hamblen Coles 

Daniel Joseph Connelly 

John Steven Connolly 

Leno Charles Corrieri 

James Edward Coughlin 

Thomas Edward Cox 

David J. Cremins 

James D. Crosby 

Harvey D. Crowell 

Percey Fielding Crowell 

Nathan R. Dahl 

Daniel Daley 

James H. Dalton 

Sidney March Davey 

Luigi De Angelis 

John Del Bene 

Cornelius Joseph Dennehy 

James Richard Dennehy 

Daniel A. Doherty 

J. Joseph Doyle 

Charles Fred Eaton 

Albert S. Engel 

James Frederick Escott 

Chester Irving Fairbairn 

Joseph Fama 

James H. Fannon 

Linwood Earl Fardy 

Santino M. Farfarelli 

Thomas Edward Ferguson 

Frederick A. Finigan 

Albert Lyman Fisher 

Robert E. Fitzgerald 

William Thomas Fitzgerald 

Roland M. Forbes 

Herbert Lincoln Foss 

Hugh Joseph Gallagher 

Clayton D. Galvin 

Francis A. Galvin 

Lawrence Francis Gammon 

Michael Garabediantz 

Stuart B. Garland 

Victor Gaudet 

Roy Humbert Gaunce 

Francis Andrew Geary 

Maurice E. Gillespie 



George H. Gilliland 
Louis T. Giroux 
Victor Goduti 
Ralph E. Gordinier 
Arthur William Graham 
Edward F. Griffith 
James F. Hall 
Prescott Wallace Hall 
Ralph M. Hall 
Fred J. Halloran 
Alfred A. Hanni 
James Happach 
Earl C. Hardy 
Norman S. Hatch 
William von Hein 
George N. Heos 
James W. Holmes 
Francis Whittier Hooper 
Francis R. Houston 
Arthur A. Isinger 
Herbert J. Jackson 
Stewart A. Jackson 
George Fred Johnson 
Warren J. Jones 
Edward L. Kazazian 
Kermit S. Kearley 
Arthur Michael Keefe 
Homer G. Kelly 
Clarence Willard Kilmer 
Leo J. Larkin 
Robert Phillip La Voie 
Bertram Lawson 
Albert M. Leahy 
Samuel Lebovich 
Frazer R. Lee 
Arthur R. Lees 
Thomas J. Legere 
Robert B. LeRoy 
John William Leslie 
Joseph A. Lodico 
John Luongo 
John James Lyons 
William Arthur Maclnnis 
William Henry MacMillan 
John Carl Marcotti 
Joseph P. Maroney 
Edward T. Martignetti 
Paul Clark Martin 
Americo A. Mattola 
Charles Kingsley McAloney 
Charles Reed McCormick 
Louis J. McKay 
John J. McManus 
Russell McNaught 
John S. McNeilly 
John McNulty, Jr. 
Edward J. Merrill 
Theodore F. Metzler 



258 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



-John Roy Milbury 
Edward I. Modist 
Elmer W. Moore 
Joseph James Moran 
^Nazzarino Mucci 
Joseph Vincent Mulligan 
Herbert F. Murley 
Herbert John Nelson 
David B. Nissenbaum 
Amadeo Anthony Notaro 
Sumner C. Noyes 
"William O'Brien 
Joseph Francis Olson 
James Joseph O'Neil 
Robert G. Parker 
Walter Francis Pelton 
Palmer Chapman Phillips 
Harold Piers 
Edward M. Pollard 
John H. Porter 
Peter R. Prevet 
Raphael Preziuso 
George L. Priestman 
Ernest E. Hublicover 
George William Robbins 
Robert Raymond Roberts 
James Rogers 
Walter Wilson Ross 
Mario A. Rubino 
.Armando John Saltomortine 



Joseph F. Sampson 
Eugene Francis Sanchez 
Kenneth Robert Sanchez 
Ansilio Sarno 
Isaac Hillson Schwartz 
Claire Henry Scott 
Wardlow Reginald Sears 
George Sheehan 
Sidney Sidel 
George S. Silk 
Earl Randolph Sinclair 
Roy E. Smith 
John Wallace Spencer 
William Stanion 
Eugene E. Sullivan 
Charles Robert Swett 
Emery Folger Taylor 
Freeman Taylor 
Thomas F. Thornton 
Reid H. Thurber 
Frank Velleca 
Loren H. Walker 
Samuel Wall 
Lewis Cavine Watt 
William George Wattie, Jr. 
Charles G. Webber 
Irvine E. Whitcomb 
Francis Roy Williams 
Francis J. Wilson 
Grover Robert Winn 



Southern 



GIRLS 

Celeste Mary Arata 
Araxie G. Atamian 
Helen Louise Atkins 
Agnes Marie Barry 
Gertrude Frances Barry 
Lillian Edna Belle 
Edith Ernestine Bidmead 
Winnie M. Blundon 
Ruth Mary Bridges 
Florence Brown 
Helen Claire Burns 
Lynthel Ray Butler 
Sylvia Josephine Cangiano 
Louisa Capuano 
Marion C. Carboine 
Marguerita E. Carmosino 
Carmela Agnes Carpenter 
Geraldine Dorothea Carran 
Alice Dorothea Carroll 
Mary E. Church 
Anna R. Clements 
Margaret Mary Cloran 



Clare Elizabeth Cole 
Gertrude Ann Coleman 
Genevieve Gertrude Conway 
Alice Frances Corcoran 
Bertha May Corliss 
Charlotte Adeline Corliss 
Josephine Beatrice Cubellis 
Alice Mary Davison 
Regina De Franco 
Mary Elizabeth Delaney 
Agnes Cecilia Dolan 
Margaret M. Dynan 
Florence Mildred Erb 
Esther Almeda Fenner 
Rose Fishlin 

Agnes Elizabeth Fitzpatrick 
Priscilla B. L. Foster 
Marion E. Gallagher 
Rose Gallant 
Mae L. Gardner 
Evelyn Jeannette Garland 
Jeannette Ricker Giberson 
Susan N. Grady 
Mary Alice Guilderson 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



259 



Florence L. Haggerty 

Anna R. Hagopian 

Pauline Emily Harer 

Rose Anser Harrison 

Margaret Rosalie Heshion 

Carrie E. Hiltz 

Ruth Kathryn Hodges 

Helen Julia Horrigan 

Mary Elizabeth Hughes 

Anna Helen Jaskun 

Mildred Prances Johnstone 

Helen G. Kane 

Dorothy Thelma Kawabe 

Freda B. Keane 

Gertrude F. Keane 

Ruth Catherine Kennedy 

Virginia A. Kenney 

Emma B. Kimball 

Belle Kratman 

Pauline Kravitz 

Margaret Anne Lacey 

Eunice Frances Lanigan 

Charlotte J. La Pearl 

Marian F. La Rose 

Sadie Lazarus 

Dorothea Franc es Lenihan 

Frances Evelyn Lord 

Bessie Lotenschleger 

Edna Mae Lucas 

Irene Katherine Lynch 

Louise Macarelli 

Mary Dorothy MacDonald 

Elsie Mae MacEachern 

Katherine Marie Mack 

Edith Doris MacLachlan 

Evelyn Louise Magwood 

Elda Inez Malenfant 

Mary Elizabeth Malloy 

Rose Manfra 

Irene Marie Marchant 

Anna M. Marenghi 

Adelaide Marshall 

Wilhelmina Leandrew Marshall 

Doris Aleda Mason 

Gertrude Catherine McAvoy 

Helen Catherine McCarthy 

Louise M. McCarthy 

Sara Frances McDermott 

Helen Gertrude McDonald 

Edna P. Mclnnis 

Helen Frances McKay 

Gertrude Mary McMaster 

Doris Althea McNeill 

Lauriana Rose Medeiros 

Margaret Miller 

"M. Louise Miller 

Mary E. Millerick 

-Alice Bernadette Molan 



Mildred Eleanor Moloy 

Margaret Elizabeth Murphy 

Mildred E. Murphy 

Martha Bell Murray 

Janice Leonore Nadelman 

Eleanor A. Nicoli 

Mary Agnes E. Nolan 

Alice L. Norris 

Sara Norris 

Margaret Mary Nourse 

Margaret Elizabeth NowelL 

Florence Mary O'Connor 

Jean Caroline Oulton 

Frances May Overlock 

Josephine Palombo 

Mildred Parks 

Helen D. Paton 

Mildred Barbara Pender 

Edwina Perry 

Freda A. Peschal 

Althea Wyman Pratt 

S. Bernice Reed 

Ebe Mary Rossi 

Lillian Marie Ryan 

Mary Theresa Ryn 

Doris Leona Ryer 

Antoinette Sarno 

Rebecca P. Schwartzman 

Margaret Catherine Sharpe 

Anna T. Shulman 

Lena Charlotte Shulman 

Ida Shuman 

Hilda Irene Silva 

M. Eileen Simpson 

Elizabeth Bennett Small 

Priscilla Clemencia Soeiro 

Helen Mary Sutherby 

Irene Dorathea Swanson 

Florence Agnes Taddia 

Goldie G. Talalewsky 

Frances Hanora Tamlyn 

Julia Mary Tarabelli 

Gwendolyn Gertrude Thorne 

Catherine Elizabeth Thornton. 

Theresa Helen Travers 

Elizabeth Winifred Troy 

Mary Anna Vitiello 

Alice P. Weinstein 

Minnie Weinstein 

Dorothy Frances White 

Ethel B. Whitehouse 

Anna Elizabeth Wischmann 

E. Louise Wright 

BOYS 

Joseph Eugene Albertini 
Albert A. F. Antolini 



WO 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Jas. Sherwood Armstrong 
Malcolm E. Austin 
Edward F. Backus 
Hugo Charles Baratta 
James E. Barnes, Jr. 
Albert James Barry 
Norman A. Belden 
D. Albert Benedetto 
George Joseph Blute 
Arthur L. G. Bouchie 
Edward Francis Brett 
John Daniel Brooks 
Bento C. Brown 
William Emmanuel Brown, Jr. 
Charles Herbert Bruce, Jr. 
Alden Hart Burroughs 
James F. Calderwood 
Edward G. Callahan 
Frederick King Carroll 
William T. Casey 
William Joseph Cashman 
Anthony J. Catanzano 
Isadore Cholfin 
A. Perry Cole 
Harold H. Colton 
Reynold E. Conchiglia 
J. Wilbur Copithorne 
William Joseph Coughlan 
Joseph Patrick Cronin 
Michael F. Cullinane 
John P. Curran 
Charles M. R. Curtin 
Victor E. Cusolito 
Lawrence A. Davenport 
William Henry Davidson 
Philip J. Dawson 
Harold Leo Deegan 
Thomas Joseph Deegan 
Albert J. DeSessa 
Reynold DeSimone 
John Joseph Devereaux 
George F. Donnellan 
John P. Donnelly 
Lawrence J. Donovan 
James Andrew Doody 
Robert Franklin Douglass 
Israel Edelstein 
Myer Edelstein 
Paul Norton Eldredge 
Joseph Estrella 
Charles J. Feeley 
John E. Fennelly 
James Raymond Fermoyle 
Joseph David Finkelstein 
Samuel I. Fishlin 
Timothy J. Fitzpatrick 
William Joseph Fitzpatrick 
George Henry Flahive 



Kingsley S. Florian 

James J. Flynn 

John William Flynn 

Caesari Forni 

John Joseph Forrest 

Joseph Ferdinand Fortunati 

F. Gerard Fuchs 

Thomas Francis Gallagher 

John A. Gately 

J. Eugene Gaumont 

Charles Gibb 

Samuel Goldstein 

Henry E. Gosse 

Edward William Grieneeks 

Leo Richard Grue 

John J. Guilderson 

C. Roy Hampton 

John Joseph Harrington 

Ellsworth J. Hartshorn 

Elwood R. Hayden 

Leslie C. Heuss 

Francis W. Higgins 

Herbert William Husselbee 

Leo Joseph Johnson 

Robert Stephen Johnstone 

Eugene Curran Keenan 

Edward J. Kelleher 

Edwin J. Kelley 

Shepard H. Kelley 

Fred W. Keppe 

Paul Vincent Kingsley 

Maurice Michael Kirk 

Francis Joseph Lawless 

Jack Lazarus 

Walter F. J. Lucy 

Kenneth F. Maclver 

L. Allen MacKenney, Jr. 

Albert E. MacLaughlin 

Francis Edward Mahan 

Ardash Matthewsian 

Harry McCrensky 

John Joseph Mclsaac 

John Francis McNamara 

Edward James Moran 

John F. Moran 

Thomas H. Moran, Jr. 

Charles Cole Morrill 

Eugene John Morris 

John Joseph Francis Mullin 

James H. Noel 

Joseph Michael Noone 

Robert J. Noone 

Cornelius O'Brien 

Richard Alfred O'Brien 

James Leo W. O'Connor 

John Joseph O'Connor 

Dennis Edward O'Donnell 

William Joseph O'Donnell 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



261 



Anthony Rodrick Oliveira 
Raymond Joseph Oliver 
Charles F. O'Neil 
Daniel J. O'Neill 
Thomas J. O'Toole 
Ralph A. Paradiso 
Austin Perry Pendelton 
Edmund T. Perry 
Roy Harriman Phelps 
Albert W. Priest 
John P. Quinlan 
Thomas Marcian Quinlan 
John J. Quinn 
Ambrose John Regan 
John Albert Reynolds 
James Albert Rice 
Arthur Bernard Rogers 
Robert C. Rogers 
Wilfred James Rossiter 
Philip J. Sculley 
Richard H. Sears 
William R. Seeley 
Edward Donald Shaw, Jr. 



William Ambrose Shea 
George L. Shields 
Carleton Gilbert Skinner 
Gordon K. Smith 
Lawrence 0. Smith 
Samuel Snyder 
Vincent F. Spezzafero 
Peter Francis Stapleton 
Lee P. Sturtevant 
Edward Earl Summers 
Charles Abraham Tashjian 
Richard A. Taylor 
Anthony Richard Tierney 
Edmund G. Wahlers 
Albert Edwin Walker 
George E. Wallstrom 
Joseph J. Waters 
Milton Z. Wein 
J. Richard Welch 
Arthur Russell Wyse 
Frank Yelinek 
Richard Edmund Younker 



Western 



GIRLS 

Helen M. Albano 
Evelyn Frances Allen 
Catherine Petrie Anderson 
Muriel L. Armstrong 
Jennette Atlansky 
Frances Kathryn Avanzino 
Virginia Bagdigian 
Helen May Baker 
Marguerite Evelyn Baker 
Evelyn M. Barr 
Maud I. Barr 
Evelyn F. Baruth 
Dorothy Bates 
Helen G. Beardsley 
Helen M. Berry 
Doris May Bibby 
Maxine Barbour Blake 
Reta Jane Blundell 
Dorothy Louise Bone 
Edith Loraine Brigham 
Phyllis Kathryn Brooks 
Marjorie Brown 
Dorothy Burnham 
Beatrice Eileen Buswell 
Corinne Charlotte Carlson 
Eleanor Louise Carroll 
Barbara Helen Carter 
Isabelle Thomas Channell 
Reta Blanche Chase 



Jennie Audrey Clarke 
Alberta F. Coakley 
Ruth Woodvine Coit 
Mabel Dyer Collupy 
Judith L. Conant 
Eleanor May Cook 
Anna Louise Copithorne 
Bertha May Corfield 
Dorothy Louise Cotton 
May Phoebe Cotton 
Mildred J. Craig 
Caroline Elizabeth Crosby 
Dorothy Crosby 
Isabel S. Crossman 
Velma Mae Crossman 
Helen C. Crowley 
Margaret M. Crowley 
Helen Mae Curran 
Marjorie Olive Dalton 
Ellen Janet Darling 
Elinor Josephine Delfini 
Nonie H. Demarjian 
Dorothy K. DeWitt 
Eleanor Dill 

Dorothy Virginia Dolloff 
Helen Marie Donavan 
Margaret Elizabeth Donovan 
Eleanor C. Downes 
Abbie J. Drago 
Evelyn Marie Dreisigaker 
Virginia Lee Drevitson 



ZV2 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Evelyn E. Duff 
Madeline Catherine Dugan 
Pauline Nathalie Dussault 
Frances Gertrude Edmands 
Arline Edwards 
Ruth Gertrude Edwards 
Florence Isabelle Elliott 
Mary Elizabeth Egan 
Eva Blanche Ellis 
Margaret Faith Emery 
Evelyn L. E. Engborg 
Elvina J. English 
Mary A. Ennis 
Anna J. Evans 
Dorothy M. Farrell 
Kathryn C. Field 
Marion Evelyn Field 
Lillian Louise Finn 
Blanche Dorothy Finnin 
Edith Marjorie Flagg 
Helen D. Fitzgerald 
Dorothy Fuchs 
Ruth Sheppard Gallagher 
Ruth Frances Garrod 
Eunice Madlyn Gillis 
Dorothy Jane Giimore 
Doris Flora Graves 
Bertha R. Hamelburg 
Edith Marjorie Hamilton 
Minerva Stearns Harrington 
Ruth G. Harrington 
Grace Miriam Hayes 
Elizabeth Head 
Eliza Henriques 
Ruth M. Herlihy 
Dorothy Marion Heme 
Erma Winona Hicks 
Ethel A. Hodgkins 
Elsie May Hodson 
Harriet Hazel Hoitt 
Dorothy Edith Hopkins 
Helen V. Horsman 
Ida Gwendolyn Hudson 
Ina M. Hughes 
Helen Joan Hurley 
Dorothy Helen Huskins 
Grace Doris Johnson 
Mary T. Johnston 
Elmer Carr Jones 
Myrtle M. Jordan 
Margaret E. Joseph 
Ernestine R. Keach 
Dorothy Eleanor Keith 
Gertrude Frances Kendall 
Dorothy M. Kenney 
Rosamond Margaret Kenney 
Eileen M. Kiley 
Ruth M. Kiley 



Janet Walker Kilpatrick 

Irene Clara King 

Mona Kissack 

Katherine Frances Koen 

Marie Virginia LaFleur 

Jean Carlyle Lamb 

Vincenzia LaRocca 

Louise A. LeFarve 

Bertha Carrie Leuchter 

Geraldine Freeman Lewis 

Erma A. Lofgren 

Kathryn B. MacKay 

Doris Mae Manton 

Elizabeth M. Marderosian 

Frances Louise Martin 

Mildred J. McDonough 

Agnes H. McGowan 

Alice Louise Mclntyre 

Doris Marion Mekkelsen 

Mary Rose Mingolelli 

Lolly Moller 

Ethel Moore 

Lillian Helen Moore 

Georgina L. Morey 

Muriel Jay Lloyd Morse 

Delia Eugena Moses 

Helen A. Murray 

Clareta Florence Nash 

Marion G. Nemser 

Catherine Edith Newton 

Elizabeth Marion Nickerson 

Marion Phillips Nickerson 

Edna Marie Nordgren 

Emma Nozzolillo 

Bernice Edwina Odell 

Catherine Margaret O'Donnell 

Mary Barbara O'Hare 

Catherine Josephine O'Leary 

Catherine Marie Otto 

Dorothy Elsie Parker 

Jean S. Parker 

Laura M. Peck 

Dorothy Christina Pelham 

Evelyn Isabel Peoples 

Evelyn Pingree 

Doris Adell Prescott 

Myra Roxane Preston 

Dorothy Estelle Redmond 

Ida C. Richardson 

Margaret Elizabeth Robinson 

Evelyn Margaret Rockwood 

Dorothy Rounds 

Charlotte Helen Rumford 

Marjorie Florence Sadlier 

Alice C. Sahlin 

Marion Elizabeth Sargent 

Mary Sexton 

Grace Edna Sheldon 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



263 



Annie Gertrude Smith 
Marion Elizabeth Smith 
Madeline F. Sousa 
Cornelia Spencer 
Anna Belle Stanley 
Gretchen Stephens 
Roberta F. Sterling 
Astrid E. Swenson 
Doris Ruth Swenson 
Eleanor F. Taapken 
Lillian Eleanor Tarbox 
Olive J. Thompson 
Frances Torredo 
Mildred Elaine Union 
Evelyn Lillian Vollm 
Charlotte Cornelia Walsh 
Ruth Lavinia Wanamaker 
Marion B. Warburton 
Edith Regina Weiand 
Helen M. Westgate 
Gladys Mae Whitman 
Winona Wentworth Wiggin 
Jessie L. Williams 
Jean F. Yacubian 



BOYS 

Per Eric Anderson 
Joseph Armstrong 
Edward F. Atkinson 
Lawrence Avanzino Jr. 
Lawrence Peter Basteri 
Irving Carol Bats on 
Allen C. Bean 
William Bettencourt 
Paul F. Blackmer 
Wallace Pierce Bourgess 
David A. Bowers 
James Alexander Boyce 
George Brooks 
John Francis Buckley 
Charles Royal Bunton 
Joseph Condon Campbell 
Christopher J. Chisholm 
John P. Clair 
Ralph A. Clark 
Gordon Douglas Clive 
David Joseph Coady 
Loring Derby Collier 
George Freeman Cook 
Richard Bertram Cooper 
William Cox 
Miles G. Crouse 
William Fraser Cruwys 
Joseph Francis Curley 
Carl Walter Dahlstrom 
Clarence Ladner Docherty 



Francis Joseph Donahue 
Winfield Albert Dow 
Warren P. Downing 
Charles Nathan Dresser 
Gerald J. Duggan 
Chester John Dunn 
Paul John Dussault 
Frederick John Eimert 
Edward B. Ekstrand 
Philip John Ekstrand 
James Francis Eldridge 
Walter Olaf Engelson 
George English 
Edward H. Ewell 
Charles Mclnnis Falla 
Herbert Reynold Fallgren 
Francis Xavier Flynn 
Charles George Fowler 
Edward Harry Friberg 
Harold L. Fudge 
W. Lorenzo Gaynor 
Daniel A. Gilmore 
Earl Girard 
Ernest Leo Goguen 
David Goldberg 
Leslie T. Graves 
Roy Hall 

John Patrick Hart 
Russell V. Hart 
Paul A. J. Healy 
Wilbur F. Herman 
George S. Hilton 
William Hart Howard 
Stafford Hutchinson 
Joseph Paul Ivaska 
Albert Edward Johnson 
Albert W. Johnson 
Arnold Edward Johnson 
Leslie R. Johnson 
Thomas Johnston 
George Reeves Kaup 
Stanley George Kindred 
George Herbert Krauth 
Walter E. Lamb 
Edward B. Lane 
Donald Matthew Leary 
Edward Joseph LeClair, Jr. 
Henry Hirsch Levenson 
Leonard Marshall Levy 
Herman W. Liehr 
Richard MacKay Locke 
James P. Long 
Alexander MacDonald 
Hugh Wallace MacDonald 
William MacLaughlan 
Eugene Alfred Macomber 
Raymond Roger Mailhiot 
Edgar A. Manton 



2U 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Arthur Harry Marderosian 
Anthony Massa 
Gardner Colburn Mears 
Ralph E. Mersereau 
Joseph C. Meskell 
Randolph Ainslee Miller 
Robert Henry Molander 
William J. Moore 
William Henry Mowat 
Karl Nelson Myers 
Ford Naugler 
George E. Nicoll 
Jack Lorimer Nicoll 
Edgar E. Ormes 
Edward F. Oxenham 
Alfred J. Pearce 
John Mortimer Peters 
Raymond D. Phelan 
Arthur C. Pierce 
Gordon E. Pratt 
Louis E. Rabaglia 
Pred L. Reed 
William Henry Regan, Jr. 
Robert Boyd Richard 
Milton T. Riddick 
George Thomas Robinson 
Ernest Dustin Sackett 
Emilio Scavitto 
John E. Schromm 
Richard Samuel Scoyne 
Earle Gale Scribner 
Harold Stanley Seader 



Patrick Sexton 
Joseph R. Shea 
Paul Lawrence Sheridan 
James Edward Smith 
Cecil R. E. Spencer 
Cecil L. Stark 
William Barkley Sullivan 
George Henry Taylor 
Raymond Albion Taylor 
Nelson Wingate Thomas 
Paul Walford Thurston 
Francis T. Thyne 
Curtice Nye Townsend 
Thomas A. Tracy 
Christopher C. Trotta 
Glenn Truelson 
Almon Tutein 
Roland M. Wardrobe 
Laurence John Ugolini 
Edwin L. Waters 
Norman B. Watt 
Frederick Andrew Weldon 
Edward Clarke Wellington 
Clayton P. Wells 
Charles Whitcomb 
William F. Whitney 
Raymond H. Whittaker 
Albert Frederick Wilkins 
Graton Edmund Williams 
Laurence Remington Williams 
J. Robert Wilson 
Charles M. Zee 



TABLE 27.— VOCATIONAL SCHOOL GRADUATES 

Vocational School for Boys 

Salvadore Bova Count 
Elmer Francis Dodge 
Thomas Oliver Johnson, Jr. 
Carl Helge Jorgensen 
William Reynolds Keeley 
William Cole Keen, Jr. 
George Bradford Lilly 
George Augustus Mclntire 
Joseph Augustus Sheridan 
James Francis Traniello 



Table 28. — Organization of School Board, 1926 
School Committee 



"Harry M. Stoodley 
John J. Hayes 



Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



265 



Members 

EX-OFFICIXS 

Leon M. Con well, Mayor .... 17 Monmouth street 

Henry J. Connell, President, Board of Aldermen . 150 Pearl street 



Francis J. Fitzpatrick 
John J. Hayes 



WARD ONE 



2 Austin street 
10 Wisconsin avenue 



William F. Dewire 
Christopher J. Muldoon 

Richard W. Bennett 
James C. Scanlan 

Alice P. Russell 
Walter E. Whittaker 

Harry M. Stoodley 
Minnie S. Turner 



Elizabeth J. Carnes 
Walter I. Chapman 

Herbert Cholerton 
Edwin A. Shaw 



ward two 



ward three 



ward four, 



WARD FIVE 



WARD SIX 



WARD SEVEN 



384 Washington street 
88 Concord avenue 



. 25 Wesley park 
36 Munroe street 



233 School street 
135 Walnut street 



283 Highland avenue 
64 Hudson street 



10 Mossland street 
18-a Central street 



94 College avenue 
63 College avenue 



Superintendent of Schools 

Charles S. Clark 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days, 
and 8.30 on Saturdays. 



Assistant Superintendent of Schools 
Everett W. Ireland, 138 Powder House Boulevard 



Superintendent's Office Force 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 
Ruth 0. Elliott, 4 Lincoln place. 
Marion E. Marshall, 30 Gilman street. 
Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Highland avenue. 
S. Regina Truelson, 38 Rogers avenue. 
Bernice F. Parker, 11 Dickson street. 



266 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Board Meetings 

January 4 April 26 October 25 

January 25 May 24 November 29 

February 15 June 28 December 27 

March 29 September 27 

8.15 o'clock. 

Standing Committees 

NOTE — The number first named is chairman; the second, vice- 
chairman. 

District I. — Fitzpatrick, Hayes, Muldoon 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT. 

District II. — Muldoon, Dewire, Hayes 

KNAPP. PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — Bennett, Scanlan, Dewire 

POPE, C I'M MINGS. 

District IV. — Whittaker, Russell, Bennett 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Turner, Stoodley, Russell 

FORSTER, BINGHAM, PROCTOR. 

District VI. — Chapman, Carnes, Turner 

CARR, MORSE, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Cholerton, Shaw, Carnes 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

High Schools. — Shaw, Chapman, Hayes, Dewire, Scanlan, Russell, 
Stoodley. 

School Accommodations. — Fitzpatrick, Cholerton, Dewire, Bennett, 
Whittaker, Stoodley, Carnes, Mayor Conwell, President Connell. 

Teachers. — Cholerton, Turner, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Bennett, Russell, 
Chapman. 

Finance. — Hayes, Stoodley, Muldoon, Scanlan, Whittaker, Chapman, 
Cholerton, Mayor Conwell, President Connell. 

Text Books and Courses of Study. — Chapman, Muldoon, Hayes, Bennett, 
Russell, Turner, Shaw. 

Industrial Education. — Muldoon, Shaw, Fitzpatrick, Bennett, Russell, 
Turner, Carnes. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics. — Whittaker, Fitzpatrick, 
Dewire, Scanlan, Stoodley, Carnes, Cholerton. 

Rules and Regulations. — Turner, Hayes, Dewire, Scanlan, Whittaker, 
Carnes, Shaw. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 207 



TABLE 29— TEACHERS IN SERVICE, JANUARY, 1926 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Central Hill 

Name and Residence 

John A. Avery, Head Master, 155 Summer Street 
Everett W. TuttJe, Vice-Head Master, 62 Highland Ave. 
Frank H. Wilkins, Master, 73 Foster Street, Arlington 
John L. Hayward, Master, 242 School Street 
Harry F. Sears, Master, 44 Orris Street, Melrose Hlds. 
William W. Obear, Master, 10 Greenville Street 
George M. Hosmer, 31 Adams Street 
Laurence A. Sprague, 17 Perkins Street, West Newton 
Arthur N. Small, 11 Pembroke Street 
Fred W. Carrier, 14 Lloyd Street, Winchester 
Wallace S. Hall, 37 Perkins Street, West Newton 
Irving P. Colman, Greenbush 
Albert O. Plantinga, 12 Radcliffe Rd., Melrose 
George E. Pearson, 325 Highland Avenue 
Forrest S'. Miller, 8 Hudson Street 
L. Thomas DeCelles, 46 Ware Street 
Francis J. Mahoney, 16 Parker Street 
Helen L. Follansbee, 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Harriet E. Tuell, 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Elizabeth Campbell, 39 Greenville Street 
A. Laura Batt, 2 Madison Street 
M. Helen Teele, 11 Jason Street, Arlington 
Blanche S. Bradford, 163 Summer Street 
Grace E. W. Sprague, 52 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
Mrs. Lucy I. Topliff, 220 Walnut Street, Brookline 
Ella D. Gray, 147 Walnut Street 
Grace Gatchell, 67 Boston Street 

A. Marguerite Browne, 10 Chauncey Street, Cambridge 
Esther Parmenter, 16 Mystic Lake Drive, Arlington 
Annie C. Wooodward, 144 School Street 
Alice A. Todd, 82 Munroe Street 
Ella W. Bowker, 2 Hillside Avenue 
Florence L. McAllister, 23 Wallace Street 
Laura R. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 
Julia A. Haley, 88 Prospect Street 
Mary C. Smith, 117 Prospect Street 
Alfreda Veazie. 193 Linden Street, Everett 
Mrs. Phebe E. Mathews, 159 Morrison Avenue 
Ilene C. Richie, 15 Willoughby Street 
Ella W. Burnham, 58 Walnut Street 
*Mrs. Cornelia D. Pratt, 112-A Glenwood Road 
Bernice O. Newborg, 47 Cushing Street, Medford 
Louise M. Saunders, 391 Broadway 
Gertrude W. Chaffin, 10 Copeland Terrace, Maiden 
Elizabeth M. Welch, 3 Washington Avenue, Arlington Hts. 
Harriet M. Bell, 62 Highland Avenue 
Margery Moore, 58 Walnut Street 

Mrs. Edith M. Hudson, 63 Maynard Street, Arlington 
Harriet C. Whitaker, 75 Walnut Street 
Ruth C. MacDuffie, 87 Abbotsford Rd., Brookline 
Ruth E. Arrington. 37 Walnut Street 
Margaret Cochran, 34 Hancock Street, Medford 
Elizabeth I. Fury, 9 Cleveland Street 
Mrs. Sadie L. Marshall, 103 Electric Avenue 
Carmen Solano, 1135 Commonwealth Avenue, Allston 
Phebe R. Boole, 21 Sacramento Street, Cambridge 
Ruby F. Sutherland, 157 Lowell Street 
Helen B. Ryan, 35 Columbus Avenue 
Sophia C. Mague, 1766 Washington Street, Auburndale 
Rena S. Hezelton, 4 Pleasant Avenue 
M. Louise Hannon, 108 Thurston Street 
Elizabeth Richards, 16 Ashland Street, Medford 
Irene E. Kenney, 51 Avon Street 
Inez M. Atwater, 98 Electric Avenue 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


$4100 


1895 


2950 


1895 


2700 


1906 


2600 


1913 


2775 


1901 


2850 


1906 


2575 


1901 


2550 


1906 


2575 


1916 


2550 


1915 


2100 


1919 


2200 


1915 


2200 


1918 


2550 


1914 


2100 


1920 


1900 


1919 


2300 


1919 


2150 


1900 


1975 


1899 


1975 


1902 


1975 


1895 


1975 


1895 


1825 


1903 


2000 


1908 


1750 


1914 


1875 


1901 


1900 


1906 


1950 


1908 


1900 


1911 


1850 


1906 


1825 


1913 


1800 


1911 


1750 


1913 


1800 


1914 


1700 


1913 


1750 


1916 


1750 


1916 


1900 


1916 


1900 


1912 


1900 


1919 


1800 


1919 


1900 


1918 


1800 


1919 


1750 


1916 


1900 


1919 


1825 


1904 


1825 


1920 


1750 


1920 


1750 


1921 


1725 


1921 


1700 


1921 


1800 


1921 


1750 


1921 


1650 


1921 


1800 


1922 


1750 


1922 


1800 


1922 


1750 


1918 


1800 


1921 


1750 


1909 


1900 


1923 


1700 


1923 


1725 


1923 


1550 


1923 



268 4NNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

Name and Residence Began 

Salary Service 

Gladys B. Hastings. 17 Pleasant Avenue 1500 1924 

Estelle B. Crowe, 56 Sunset Road 1500 1920 

Hazel L. Smith, 15 Victoria Street 1200 1922 

Mrs. Helen G. Leitch, 66 Highland Avenue 1800 1924 

Mary A. Hickey, 55 Kenmere Rd., Medford 1725 1918 

Pauline D. Dodge, 222 Highland Avenue 1250 1925 

Marguerite A. Ellison, 245 Medford Street 1750 1925 

Helen C. Jackson, 36 College Avenue 1575 19£3 

Esther B. Lacount, 124 College Avenue 1475 1925 

Lila H. Paul, 55 Brackenbury Street, Maiden 1750 1925 

Helen Wilson, 173 Babcock Street, Brookline 1200 1925 

tVirginia Crowne, 58 Ibbetson Street 1000 1925 

fNettie V. Eastman, 2 Westland Avenue, Boston 1650 1925 

Mabell M. Ham, Secretary, 156 Summer Street 1500 1906 

Mildred F. Moses, Clerk, 15 Simpson Avenue $19.50 per week 1924 

Mrs. Minne T. Wyman, Matron, 146 Oakland Ave., Arl. Hgt. 1500 1923 

* Leave of Absence 
t Temporary Teacher 



NORTHEASTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
Marshall Street 

James S. Thistle, Master, 13 Conwell Avenue 
Joseph S. Hawthorne, Vice-Principal, 233 School Street 
Arthur J. Marchant, 60 Barlett Street 
Walter W. Newcombe, 49 Tennyson Street 
John J. Malone, 71 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Benjamin Q. Belonga, 24 Jackson Street, Cliftondale 
Robert K. Hughey, 12 Maplewood St., Maiden 
Alice M. Austin, 328 Poplar Street, Roslindale 
Mrs. Mina P. Bickford, 36 Emerson Street, Medford 
Emma G. Blanchard, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 
Mary I. Bradish, 63 Dudley Street, Medford 
Mona Burke, 278 Lowell Street 
Adela L. Balch, 52 Mt. Vernon Street 
Lillian Belanger, 75 Marshall Street 
Marie Clifford, 1648 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
fAgnes M. Conner, 5 Russell Street, Medford 
Margaret J. Cotter, 9 No. Union Street 
George K. Coyne, 59 Preston Road 
Mrs. Clara B. Donlon, 73 Pleasant Street, Ayer 
Lucy Dorr, 60 Oakley Road, Belmont 
Grace M. Driscoll, 25 Arthur Street 
Kathinka Fessman, 1126 Boylston Street, Boston 
Florence R. Gallagher, 16 Otis Street, Medford 
Helen L. Galvin, 1111 Boylston Street, Boston 
Mrs. Amelia M. Gray, 96 Magoun Avenue, Medford 
Pertie I. Gray, 16 Maple Avenue 

Edyth M. Grimshaw, 121 West Concord St., Boston 
Mrs. Elsie M. Guthrie, 50 Bromfield Road 
Minnie A. Holden, 9 Sanborn Avenue 
Amy S. Irish, 59 Bailey Road, Watertown 
Edith L. Laycock, 23 Melvin Street 
Mary F. Mead, 107 College Avenue 
Elizabeth J. Mooney, 20 Pleasant Avenue 
tMrs. Ruth S. Moore, 28 Indiana Avenue 
Mary E. O'Shaughnessy, 156 School Street 
Alice M. Patterson, 35 Clewley Rd., W. Medford 
Katherine Quiglev, 580 Adams Street, East Milton 
Katherine E. Reycroft, 32 Winthrop Street, Charlestown 
Mrs. Constance H. Scherer, 155-R Summer Street 
tEleanor Scully, 22 Highland Avenue 
Mrs. Gladys M. Sheldon, 55 Liberty Street, Everett 
Velma B. Strout, 36 Francesca Avenue 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


$3175 


1924 


2350 


1915 


2150 


1914 


2150 


1917 


1900 


1924 


2075 


1922 


1950 


1925 


1550 


1925 


1600 


1903 


1700 


1902 


1600 


1899 


1200 


1925 


1900 


1921 


1200 


1926 


1600 


1907 


1100 


1925 


1000 


1925 


1100 


1925 


1675 


1914 


1600 


1919 


1500 


1920 


1825 


1912 


1750 


1918 


1700 


1903 


1600 


1920 


1675 


1917 


1600 


1909 


1750 


1919 


1675 


1906 


1600 


1923 


1675 


1913 


1750 


1905 


1675 


1904 


1300 


1925 


1400 


1923 


1650 


1919 


1600 


1921 


1300 


1924 


1600 


1917 


600 


1925 


1600 


1919 


1750 


1918 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 2(>9 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

Name and Residence Began 

Salary Service 

May B. Thompson, 12 Adams Street 1675 1918 

Elizabeth M. Warren, 1126 Boylston St., Boston 1675 1897 

Florence M. Wheeler, 138 Sycamore Street 1650 1924 

Olive E. Whittier, 42 Percy Road, Lexington 1600 1918 

Ruth Fowler, Clerk, 45 Franklin Street $19.50 per week 1924 

t Temporary Teacher 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Vinal Avenue Began 

Salary Service 

George M. Wadsworth, Master, Whitman $3100 1891 

Raymond E. Shepherd, Vice-Principal, 120 Central St. 2325 1919 

Arthur E. Gordon, 116 School Street 2000 1918 

Melvin T. Carver, 247 Winthrop Street. Winthrop 2000 1917 

Herbert H. Shallies, Main Street, Lynnfield 2000 1923 

Clara B. Sackett, 41 Vinal Avenue 1700 1891 

Mrs. Blanche G. North, 25 Columbus Avenue 1675 1893 

Mrs. Gertrude W. Leighton, 31 Vinal Avenue 1750 1895 

Grace T. Merritt, 10 Charnwood Road 1600 1897 

Lilla E. Mann, 39 Burnside Avenue 1650 1902 

Mrs. Mary B. Soule, 6 Aldersey Street 1600 1902 

Leila L. Rand, 186 Pleasant Street, Arlington 1750 1906 

Nona E. Blackwell, 45 Ihbetson Street 1650 1906 

Mrs. N. Theresa Hennessey, 65 Hawthorne Street, Lynn 1675 1909 

Edith L. French, 52 Prescott Street 1675 1912 

Emma J. Kennedy, 56 Walnut Street 1675 1912 

Maude M. Cunningham, 56 Walnut Street 1675 1913 

Carrie M. Frost, 102 Powder House Boulevard 1675 1920 

Charlotte A. Holmes, 24 Cambria Street 1725 1899 

Ada G. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 1600 1914 

Anna J. Coll, 65 Newton Street 1750 1916 

Olive M. Brownell, 64 Vinal Avenue 1675 1919 

Ruth H. Conner, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1700 1921 

Edith V. Blood, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1600 1921 

Mabel H. Eddy, 68 St. Stephen Street, Boston 1750 1922 

Mrs. Beulah N. Foye, 65 Hudson Street 1550 1922 

Eleanor D. Campbell, 169 Highland Avenue 1500 1922 

Ida Paly, 34 Adrian Street 1450 1922 

Martha H. Hannon, 108 Thurston Street 1725 1923 

Helen T. Currie, 22 Chetwynd Road 1300 1923 

Evelyn E. Weston, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1675 1924 

Charles W. Copp, 47 Vinal Avenue 1750 1924 

Anne C. Donohue, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1300 1924 

Alice W. Jones, 23 Chester Avenue 1675 1925 

Hortense F. Small, 91 Electric Avenue 1675 1912 

Mary L. Harrington, 1 Carver Street 1100 1925 

Lillian M. Fowler, Clerk, 87 Porter Street $19.50 per week 1924 



WESTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
Holland Street 

Arthur L. Doe, Master, 27 Spruce Street, Maiden 
Walter P. Sweet, Vice-Principal, 1061 Broadway 
John J. McLaughlin, 31 Avon Street 
Ralph E. Farnsworth, 19 Wolcott Street, Everett 
Prescott E. Whitfield, 33 Walnut Street 
Sarah E. Pray, 58 Liberty Avenue 
Clara B. Parkhurst, 146 Highland Avenue 
Edith F. Hersey, 266 Gray S'treet, Arlington 
Annie G. Smith, 59 Maple Street, Maiden 
Mary L. Bryant, 41 Mason Street 
Florence M. Hopkins, 288 Mass. Avenue, Arlfngton 





Began 


alary 


Service 


$3100 


1896 


2275 


1919 


2000 


1916 


2000 


1918 


2000 


1921 


1600 


1877 


1600 


1889 


1750 


1899 


1600 


1901 


1675 


1903 


1650 


1907 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


1800 


1912 


1725 


1912 


1650 


1912 


1775 


1912 


1600 


1917 


1650 


1917 


1600 


1917 


1675 


1917 


1600 


1917 


1600 


1919 


1675 


1908 


1675 


1918 


1650 


1921 


1750 


1916 


1700 


1913 


1600 


1922 


1475 


1922 


1700 


1923 


1500 


1923 


1300 


1924 


1275 


1924 


1175 


1924 


1400 


1924 


1800 


1924 


1600 


1924 


1300 


1926 



270 ANNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

Katherine A. Breen, 7 Cambria Street 

L. Alice Grady, 19 Billings Avenue, Medford 

Elizabeth R. Henderson, 152 Curtis Street 

Marion F. Orne, 43 Fairmount Avenue 

Mrs. Mae W. Conant, 62 Westminster Ave., Arlington Hgts. 

Marcella M. Garrick, 295 Lowell Street 

Blanche Preston, 84 Packard Avenue 

Miriam E. Priest, 6 Hudson Street 

Mrs. Geneva C. Farnswortb, 19 Wolcott Street, Everett 

Helen A. Moran, 483 Medford Street 

Emma M. Damon, 170 Central Street 

Catherine E. Giles, 5 Bradbury Ave., Wellington 

Ellen L. Bellamy, 51 Simpson Avenue 

Ethel M. Park, 87 Irving Street 

Mrs. Lillias T. Lawton, 136 Neponset Ave. Dorchester 

Mrs. Ruth A. Maxwell, 157 Summer Street 

Eleanor V. Nemser. 260 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton 

Elizabeth A. Stolba, 7 Exeter Street, Belmont 

Veola DeLauzon, 12 Pembroke Street 

Frances E. Biller, 353 Lowell Street 

Dorothy Perkins. 34 Tower Street 

Madeline E. Flynn, 57 Franklin Street 

Carolyn E. Precious, 17 Ossipee Road 

Viola M. Jackson, 107 Hollis Street, Atlantic 

Miriam Poole, 27 Owatonna Street, Auburndale 

Ruth M. Dang, 32 Almont Street, Medford 

Marion Grout, Clerk, 4 Glover Circle $19.50 per week 1924 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS (DAY) 

Davis Building, Tufts Street Began 

Salary Service 

Harry L. Jones, Principal, 137 Powder House Boulevard $3375 1896 

Nehemiah E. Gillespie, 81 Worcester Street, Boston 2100 1911 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, 27 Sewall Street 2100 1913 

H. Ralph Aubin, 6 Oxford Street 2100 1917 

Roy R. King, 14 Landers Street 1975 1918 

Philip J. Heffernan, 71 Maynard Street, Arlington 2000 1918 

Benjamin C. Bowman, 18 Michigan Avenue 1950 1919 

Charles A. Perrv, 4 Bulfinch Street, Boston 2200 1922 

Mrs. Ethel M. Smith, Clerk 18 Salem St., Medford $23 per week 1921 



INDEPENDENT HOUSEHOLD ARTS SCHOOL 

High School Building 

Mary Henleigh Brown, Director, 162 Highland Avenue 2275 1911 

CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

Folsom Building, Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue 

Began 

Salary Service 

Principal 

H Dunbar Davis, 99 Summer Street $2050 1923 

Kells S Boland, 43 Winthrop Rd, Belmont 2125 1920 

Marion H. Hathaway, 162 Central Street 1500 1924 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 271 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

(WILLIAM H.) PRESCOTT SCHOOL 

Pearl and Myrtle Street 

Name and Residence Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 12 Pleasant Avenue $3100 1889 

6 Edith M. Snell, 4 Vine Street, Melrose 1700 1900 

6 Annie L. Dimpsey, 77 Liberty Avenue 1500 1891 

6 Mary E. Richardson, 15 Pleasant Avenue 1575 1893 

6 Isabelle M. Gray, 25 Webster Street 1575 1897 

6 Doris F. Rudd, 46 Franklin Street 1100 1924 

5 Alice M. Dug-more, 1002 Broadway 1400 1923 

5 G. Hortense Pentecost, 157 Walnut Street 1575 1905 

5 *Berta M. Burnett, 51 Fresh Pond Parkway, Camb. 1500 1915 

5 Mrs. Myrtle I. Martin, 41 Putnam Street 1550 1916 

5 Gertrude T. Donahue, 28 Calvin Street 1175 1924 

5 Evelyn MacDonald, 50 Bromfield Road 1100 1924 

4 Edith C. Polechio, 29 Spruce Street, Waltham 1500 1922 

4 Mrs. Louise S. Weare, 65 Hancock Street, Boston 1500 1896 

3 Elizabeth L. Marvin. 38 Dartmouth Street 1500 1898 

3 Eleanor W. Nolan, 16 Farrington Avenue, Allston 1500 1909 

2 Louise E. Pratt, 163 Summer Street 1500 1889 

2 Mrs. Grace E. Allen, 24 Long Avenue, Belmont 1500 1919 

2 Alice W. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 1500 1901 

1 Jeannette M. Hannabell, 718 Commonwealth Ave., Bos. 1500 1917 

1 Mrs. Dorothea S. Daly, Lynnfield Centre 1500 1920 

* Leave of Absence 



SANFORD HANSCOM SCHOOL 

Webster and Rush Streets Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 49 Boston Street 1892 

4 Mrs. Agness M. Travis, 27 Marianne Rd., Waltham $1650 

4 Maude A. Nichols, 88 Belmont Street 

4 Jennie M. Twiss, 67 Berkeley Street 

3 Frances E. Robinson, 65 Glen Street 

3 Mrs. Nellie W. McPheters, 46 Powder House 

Road, Medford 

2 Martha L. Littlefleld, 163 Summer Street 

2 Florence M. Shaw, 157 Summer Street 

1 Marion A. Viets, 122 Dale Street, Waltham 

1 Ethel H. Werner, 20 Laurel Street, Arlington 

Kdgn. Elizabeth J. Baker, 19 West Cedar St., Boston 

Asst. fKathleen McCabe, 131 Josephine Avenue 

t Temporary Teacher 



CLARK BENNETT SCHOOL 

Poplar and Maple Streets Began 

Grade Salary Service 

John Sherburne Emerson, Master, 3 Preston Rd. $3000 1894 

5 Kate B. Gifford, Russell House, Lexington 1775 1902 

5:4 Lois P. Wilbur, 62 Highland Avenue 1550 1923 

4 Abbie M. Brown, 119 Morrison Avenue 1575 1923 

3 Bessie W. Young, 47 Mystic Lake Drive, Arlington 1500 1923 

3 Mrs. Katherine D. Millen. 22 Lovell Street 1550 1920 

2 Marie L. Wieczorek, 65 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge 1500 1922 

2 Sarah L. Wolfe, 121 Morrison Avenue 1350 1922 

1 Mrs. Cora B. Gowen, 1167 Boylston Street, Boston 1575 1906 

1 Alice M. Hayes, 9 Pembroke Street 1550 1913 

1 Elvira Badaracco, 1874 Beacon St., Brookline 1350 1922 

Kdgn. Helen E. Harrington, 3 Linnean Street, Cambridge 1500 1912 

Asst. Mrs. Abigail R. Bailey, 278 Arborway, Jamaica Plain 1000 1924 



$1650 


1908 


1575 


1906 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1908 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1897 


1500 


1909 


1550 


1912 


1500 


1919 


1500 


1907 


1000 


1925 



272 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

GEORGE L. BAXTER SCHOOL. 

Bolton Street 

Name and Residence Began 

Salary Service 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 22 Bowdoin St., Arlington 1913 

4 Mary G. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street $1650 1900 

4 Sue A. Fitzpatrick, 451 Somerville Avenue 1550 1912 

3 Margaret M. Breen, 461 Somerville Avenue 1550 1916 

2 tGeraldine J. Chamberlin, 451 Somerville Avenue 1000 1925 

1 Maria D. MacLeod, 78 Larchwood Drive, Cambridge 1625 1906 

Kdgn. Eleanor A. Connor, 86 Belmont S»treet 1500 1903 

t Temporary Teacher 



OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL 



Grade 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 



Concord Avenue Began 

S»alary Service 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 22 Bowdoin St., Arlington $3050 1913 

Winifred I. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 1700 1917 

Ellen C. Moynihan, 12 Farrington Avenue, Allston 1550 1919 

1575 1908 

1550 1919 

1550 1922 

1000 1925 

1550 1922 

1550 1918 

1200 1923 

1250 1923 

1175 1923 



Etta R. Holden, 9 Sanborn Avenue 
Eleanor M. Lundgren, 93 Lowden Avenue 
Marguerite G. Stanton, 60 Ossipee Road 
Catherine E. Wiggins, 39-A Walnut Street 
Mary A. Keefe, 44 Benton Road 
Agnes C. Riley, 112 Central Street 
Helen F. Gallagher, 15 Naples Road, Brookline 
Mildred D. Dewire, 383 Washington Street 
Gertrude I. McEachern, 14 Sanborn Avenue 



ALBION A. PERRY SCHOOL 

Washington Street, near Dane Street Began 

Grade S»alary Service 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 22 Bowdoin St., Arlington 1913 

5 Catherine E. Sweeney, 48 Everett St., Arlington $1650 1901 

4 Mary A. Mullin, Canton 1500 1910 

3 Grace R. O'Neil, 347 Washington Street 1550 1913 

2 Mrs. Sarah E. Murphy. 95 Lowell Street 1500 1906 

1 Helen M. Armstrong, 104 Summer Street 1100 1924 

Kdgn. Margaret McCarthy, 34 Highland Avenue 1200 1922 



CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL 

Washington and Boston Streets Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 49 Boston Street $3075 1892 

6 M. Abbie Tarbett, 11 Washington Street, Stoneham 1700 1906 

6 Harriet M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 1650 1893 

5 

5 Eva E. Perkins, 1645 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 

4 Annie G. Sheridan, 43 Highland Road 

4 A. Fern Fowler, 39 Greenville Street 

3 Rosa J. Aberle, 262 School Street 

3 M. Katherine Davis, 243 -A Highland Avenue 

2 Florence E. Locke, 14 Katherine Road, Watertown 

2 Elizabeth Sliney, 44 Benton Road 

1 Josephine Lacy, 73 Cherry Street 

1 Alice B. Frye, 101 Summer Street, Maiden 



1500 


1911 


1550 


1886 


1550 


1925 


1200 


1923 


1500 


1904 


1500 


1899 


1500 


1925 


1550 


1921 


1500 


1904 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



27a 



Grade 

4 
3 

2 

1 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

(JOHN A.) CUMMINGS SCHOOL 

School Street, near Highland Avenue 

Name and Residence Began 

Salary Service 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., AUston 18S3 

Katherine M. Fox, 152 Franklin St., Stoneham 1650 1896 



Elizabeth L. Hersey, 96 Oxford Street 
Mrs. Stella M. Hadley, 11 Greene Street 



1550 
1550 



1896 
1914 



(JOHN G.) EDGERLY SCHOOL 

Cross and Bonair Streets Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 12 Pleasant Avenue 1889 

1 Martha M. Power, 37 Gleason St., West Medford 1700 1890 
3 Mary M. Dorney, 62 Webster Street, Medford 1100 1924 

2 Ali'oe M. McFarland, 90 Prospect Street 1275 1923 



(JACOB T.) GLINES SCHOOL 

Jaques Street, near Grant Street 
Grade S 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 12 Pleasant Avenue 

6 Margaret A. Orr, 146 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

6 Harriet F. Ward, Weymouth 

5 Alice C. Blodgett, 34 Browning Road 

, 5 Mrs. Monira C. Blodgett, 84 Pearl Street 

4 Laura M. Flynn, 57 Franklin Street 

4 Mrs. Carrie Armitage, 57 Madison Street 

3 Florence E. Baxter, 42 Highland Avenue 

3 Cora J. Demond, 146 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

2 Elizabeth C. Sullivan, 74 Ossipee Road 

2 Mrs. Florence S. Fowler, 52 Browning Road 

2 Ruth M. Drew, 42 Mt. Vernon Street 

1 Isabel J. Tifft, 109 Highland Avenue 

1 Lillian Andrews, 74 Walnut Street 

Kdgn. Ida M. Kane, 28 Fellsway West 

Asst. Marjorie Gustin, 3 Virginia Street 



Began 



ilary 


Service 




1889 


$1750 


1890 


1550 


1395 


1550 


1917 


1550 


1921 


1500 


1920 


1500 


1899 


1500 


1891 


1500 


1900 


1550 


1920 


1500 


1915 


1075 


1925 


1500 


1892 


1000 


1925 


1500 


1905 


1350 


1921 



(CHARLES) FORSTER SCHOOL 

Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue 
Grade 

Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street 

5 Annie S. Gage, 32 Marshall Street 

6 Elizabeth F. Clement, 29 Kidder Avenue 
6:5 f Mr s. Sarah I. Teague, 18 Lexington Avenue 
4 Lillian J. Rollins, 44 Hall Avenue 

4 Hazel C. Wellington, 71 Oxford Street 

3 Carrie T. Lincoln, 65 Ashland Street, Medford 

3 Dorothea M. Crosby, 34 Rush Street 

2 Lillian G. Wells, 61 Bonair Street 

2:1 Gladys M. Wellington, 71 Oxford Street 

1 Grace Shorey, 142 Sycamore Street 





Began 


'alary 


Service 




1890 


$1650 


1881 


1500 


1884 


1200 


1925 


1500 


1925 


1150 


1924 


1500 


1892 


1000 


1925 


1100 


1924 


1000 


1925 


1500 


1892 



Grade 

6 
6 

6:5 
5 



(NORMAN W.) BINGHAM SCHOOL 

Lowell Street, near Vernon Street 

Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street 
Elizabeth J. O'Neil, 82 Benton Road 
Anna G. Molloy, 82 Benton Road 
Margaret Callahan, 165 Lowell Street 
Clara L. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 



Began 

Salary Service 

$3075 1890 

1725 1894 

1500 1921 

1175 1924 

1550 1902. 



274 4NNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 
Name and Residence 

5 Helen F. Wiseman, 43 Highland Ave., Cambridge 

4 Anna R. Canfield, 205 Cedar Street 

4 Alice E. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 

4:3 Barbara E. Drummey, 43 Short Street, Marlboro 

3 Lillian F. Commins, 6 Cypress Street, Cambridge 

3 Lynda V. Merrill, 26 Brastow Avenue 

2 Ruth A. Gilman, 38 Cambria Street 

2 M. Gertrude McCarthy, 36 Brastow Avenue 

2:1 tGertrude M. Dewire, 399 Washington Street 

1 Mabel E. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 

1 Frances E. Fisher, 176 Williams Avenue, East Lynn 

Kdgn. Marguerite M. Driscoll, 396 Medford Street 

Asst Mary B. White, 109 Highland Avenue 

t Temporary Teacher 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


1500 


1922 


1550 


1914 


1550 


1920 


1500 


1918 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1912 


1500 


1923 


1500 


1917 


1000 


1925 


1500 


1894 


l 1500 


1921 


1450 


1921 


1350 


1921 



Grade 



MARTIN W. CARR SCHOOL 
Atherton Street 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


i $3100 


1893 


1650 


1915 


1500 


1925 


1550 


1915 


1500 


1915 


1575 


1913 


1500 


1895 


1200 


1924 


1550 


1917 


1150 


1924 


1550 


1917 


1575 


1915 


1550 


1901 


1550 


1915 


1550 


1908 


1575 


1912 



Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., Allston $3100 

6 Eva S. Bent, 10 Steeves Circle 

6 Grace A. McElhiney, 12 Minot Avenue, Brockton 

6 Dorothy L. Lundgren, 93 Lowden Avenue 

5 Mrs. Hazel F. Quinn, 21 Hamilton St., Wollaston 

5 Lillian E. Haskell, 41 Putnam Street 

5 Elizabeth S. Foster, 53 Laurel Street 

5 |Mrs. Blanche G. Crowell, 118 Josephine Avenue 
4 Alice M. Cumming, 117 School Street 

4 Helen Hession, 57 Alpine St., Arlington Heights 
3 Margaret M. Brennan, 30 School Street 

3 Bessie I. Berry, 38 Wyllis Avenue, Everett 
2 Annie B. Russell, 14 Kidder Avenue 

2 Mary E. Flanley, 9 Avon St., Wakefield 
1 Mrs. Frances E. Savage, 303 Highland Avenue 

1 Mabel R. Ingham, 62 Central Street 

t Temporary Teacher 

(ENOCH R.) MORSE SCHOOL 

Summer and Craigie Streets Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Frank W. Seabury, Master, 18 Winslow Avenue $3175 1911 

6 Mrs. Harriette C. Hamilton, 36 Meacham Road 1700 1900 
.6:5 Lennie W. Bartlett, 49 Laurel Street 1550 1893 

5 Blanche E. Thompson, 53 Laurel Street 1650 1906 

4 Mrs. Sarah K. Lake, 199 Prospect Street, Cambridge 1550 1921 
4:3 Eva A. Wilson, 34 Benton Road 1550 1917 

3 Mrs. Agnes C. Rice, 226 Highland Avenue 1500 1900 

2 Mrs. Margaret M. Joy, 264 Brookline Ave., Boston 1500 1925 
2 Lena Monroe, 211-A Summer Street 1575 1913 
1 Mrs. Helen T. Smith, 43 Paulina Street 1500 1912 
1 Alena M. Shea, 6 Holton Street, Medford 1100 1925 

Kdgn. Gertrude Prichard, 5 Webster Street 1550 1920 

Asst. Esther D. Hamilton, 42 Francesca Avenue 1050 1924 

GEORGE O. PROCTOR SCHOOL 
Hudson Street 



Grade 



Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street 

6 Nora F. Byard, 27 College Avenue 

6 Alice G. Hosmer, 42 Boston Street 

5 Mrs. Nettie L. Fay, 15 Pleasant Avenue 

4 Ethel F. Morang, 16 Curtis Avenue 

3 Edith L. Hunnewell, 41 Mason Street 

2 Mary S. Richardson, 347 Boston Avenue, Medford 

1 Lucia Alger, 163 Summer Street 





Began 


lary 


Servicft 




1890 


1650 


1884 


1550 


1906 


1575 


1901 


1550 


1920 


1550 


1894 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1889 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



275 



Grade 

4 
3 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

GEORGE W. DURELL SCHOOL 

Beacon and Kent Streets 

Name and Residence Begun 

Salary Service 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., Allston 1893 

Abigail P. Hazelton, 28 Whitfield Road $1600 1902 

Grace E. Packard, 14 Winslow Road, Belmont 1550 1912 



Alice M. Dicker, 82 Marion Street, East Boston 



1500 



1912 



MARK F. BURNS SCHOOL 

Cherrv Street, near Highland Avenue Began 

Grade Salary Service 

Frank W. Seabury, Master 18 Winslow Avenue 1911 

4 Mrs. Margaret D. Quarrie, 21 Bay State Avenue $1650 1909 

4 Lizzie E. Hill, 93 Gainsboro St., Boston 1550 1890 

3 Annie L. Brown, 4 Saginaw Avenue, N. Cambridge 1500 1885 

3 Margaret Beattie, 401 Washington Street 1500 1914 

2 Mary E. Lacy, 73 Cherrv Street 1550 1890 

2 Ardelle Abbott, 71 Craigie Street 1550 1896 

1 Alice E. Morang, 16 Curtis Avenue 1550 1893 

1 Ruth E. Andrews, 21 College Avenue 1575 1917 



BENJAMIN G. BROWN SCHOOL 

Willow Avenue and Josephine Avenue 
Grade Si 

Geo. I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. Med. 

6 Mary T. Ford. 3 Goodwin Place, Boston 

5 Annie Sanburn, 11 East Newton St., Boston 

5 Margaret Hamblen, 295-A Summer Street 

5 Mildred S. Flint, 105 Orchard Street 

4 Anna N. Johnson, 33 Everett Avenue 

4:3 Helen M. Lawrence, 25 1 /*> Federal Street, Beverly 

3 Valborg Prebensen, 332 Beacon Street 

2 Mrs. Grace H. Bliss, 33 Whitfield Road 

2:1 Pauline Thiesfeldt, 176 Medford Street, Arlington 

1 Olivia H. Norcross, Wilmington 





Began 


ilary 


Service 


$3125 


1908 


1700 


1911 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1925 


1400 


1925 


1550 


1913 


1500 


1923 


1100 


1924 


1575 


1900 


1550 


1923 


1550 


1914 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL 

Highland Avenue and Grove Street 
Grade 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 

6 Grace M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, W. Medford 

6 Margaret McLeod, 16 Curtis Street 

6 Eva M. Barrows, 1 Glover Circle 

5 Marion Allen, 74 Collins Street, Danvers 

5 Catherine A. Burden, 50 College Avenue 

5 Mrs. Hazel M. Davis, 38 Harding Avenue, Belmont 1500 

5 Carrie E. Crockett, 889 Broadway 1550 

5 Eleanor B. Casey, 28 Bartlett Street 

Kdgn. Mrs. Dorothy C. Huddy, Oakley Terrace, Belmont 

Asst. tGenevieve Peak, 187 Willow Avenue 

t Temporary Teacher 



Began 



alary 


Service 




1897 


$1725 


1893 


1575 


1923 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1911 


1550 


1902 


1500 


1919 


1550 


1923 


1000 


1925 


1500 


1921 


600 


1925 



276 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

S. NEWTON CUTLER SCHOOL 

Powder House Boulevard, near Raymond Avenue 

r- Name and Residence Began 

Grade S»alary Service 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road $3075 1897 

6 Bernice J. Andrews, 10 Locke St., No. Cambridge 1725 1914 

6 Mrs. Minnie R. Lougee, 52 Pitcher Avenue, W. Med. 1550 1922 

6 Ella H. Bucknam, 82 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston 1500 1897 

6 Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, 163 Summer Street 1500 1893 

5 Bessie J. Baker, 19 Mills Street, Maiden 1575 1905 

5 Alice A. Libbey, 20 Chandler Street 1575 1919 

5 Eugenia Carver, 65 Hudson Street 1550 1922 

5 Wilma S. Bryant, 26 Whitfield Road 1500 1925 

4 *Mrs. Elva A. Cutler, 36 Powder House Boulevard 1500 1911 

4 Eliza I. Patterson, 65 Hudson Street 1500 1919 

4 Stella Bucknam, 35 Curtis Avenue 1575 1917 
3 

3 E. Mildred Milner, 44 Foskett Street 1550 1920 

3 Mrs. Nettie M. Humiston, 43 Fairmount Avenue 1500 1920 

2 Almena J. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 1500 1899 

2 Gladys G. Stone, 41 Marshall Street 1100 1924 

2 Pauline Emery, 5 Round Hill Rd., Saugus 1200 1925 

1 Annie H. Hall, 67 Hall Avenue 1550 1906 

1 Mary L. McKenna, 294 Lowell Street 1500 1915 

1 Eleanor E. Waldron, 135 Powder House Boulevard 1500 1919 

Kdgn. Mrs. Dorothea G. Lamb, 90 Curtis Street 1575 1921 

Asst. Hilda Foley, 16 Hamilton Street, Dorchester 1050 1923 

* Leave of Absence 



LINCOLN SCHOOL 

Broadway near Teele Square Began 

Grade Stalary Service 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 1897 

3 Eliza H. Lunt, 248 Highland Avenue $1600 1889 

4 Mrs. Lillian M. Wentworth, 248 Highland Avenue 1500 1911 
2 Olevia M. Woods, 15 Garrison Avenue 1650 1908 
1 Dorothy M. Fay, 401 Washington Street, Cambridge 1100 1925 



MARTHA PERRY LOWE SCHOOL 



Morrison Avenue near Grove Street 
Grade 

Geo. I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. 

4 May E. Small, 104 Orchard Street 

4 Stella M. Holland, 34 Francesca Avenue 

3 Maude C. Valentine, 1098 Broadway 

3 Mrs. Jane M. Taaffe, 159 Morrison Avenue 

2 Katherine E. Hourahan, 94 College Avenue 

2 Clara G. Hegan, 100 School Street 

1 Octavia A. Stewart, 15 Kenwood Street 

1 Selena G. Wilson, 11 Irving Street 



Began 

S«alary Service 

Med 1908 

$1650 1900 

1550 1903 

1500 1901 

1550 1888 

1550 1892 

1550 1897 

1550 1917 

1500 1922 



EVENING SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 



Everett W. Tuttle, High 
Francis A. Ryan, Bell and Cliff 



$7.00 
6.00 



$600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 


600 


1925 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 277 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

CADETS 

Elizabeth D. Armstrong - , 104 Summer Street 
H. Beatrice Bingham, 52 Pearl Street 
Gertrude M. Chapin, 60 Long Avenue, Belmont 
William J. Crotty, 87 Avon Street 
Jane Ann Doyle, 80 Hinckley Street 
Grace M. Henchey, 95 Thurston Street 
Anna E. Keating, 62 Ibbetson Street 
Helen Keefe, 31-A Trull Street 
Dorothy Levy, 57 Josephine Avenue 
Katherine T. Lombard, 112 Thurston Street 
Mary E. McCarthy 101 Central Street 
Catherine M. Scanlan, 36 Monroe Street 



SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Music 

12, 7 
6, 1 Mrs. Charlotte D. Lawton, 121 St. Stephen St., Boston 2,050 1898 

Drawing 
9, 1 Elfrida V. Callister, 30 Kimball Road, Arlington 1900 1925 

Penmanship 
9, 1 Ruth L. Whitehouse, 21 College Avenue 1,775 1915 

Sewing 

Mary H. Brown, Supervisor, 162 Highland Avenue *200 1913 

6, 5 Mary L. Boyd, 18 Fenwick Street 1500 1888 

6, 5 Mrs. Emma J. Ellis, 59 Marshall Street 1500 1900 

Manual Training 
Harry L. Jones, Supervisor, 137 Powder House Blvd. t200 1911 

Physical Instruction 

12, 1$ Ernst Hermann, 105 Tyler Terrace, Newton Center 1550 1914 

12, 7§ Charles A. Dickerman, 81 Willow Avenue 2500 1925 

12, 1 Margaret V. Burke, 1 Pearl Street 1375 1923 

12, 1 Alice F. Morgan, 71 Park Street 1100 1925 

Atypical 

Mary A. Holt, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1625 1910 

Mrs. Bertha M. Morton, 62 Highland Avenue 1550 1913 

Julia M. Riordan, 165 Albion Street 1675 1914 

Mildred M. Harkins, 22 Traymore Street, Cambridge 1300 1923 

Sight Saving 
Mrs. Amy F. Woodbury, 83 Pearson Road 1675 1917 



278 1NNUAL REPORTS 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January 1926 — Continued 

Thrift 
E. Bella Weisman, 17-A Melvin Street 1700 1922 

Band 
Wesley A. Maynard, 40 Vinal Avenue 1500 1925 

Americanization 

Mary A. Whitney, 10 Dow Street 1750 1916 

Mrs. Etta D. Ellsworth, Trinity Court, Boston 1700 1897 

* additional to salary as Director of Household Arts Courses 

t additional to salary as Principal of Boys' Vocational school 

t Part time 

§ Temporary 

TABLE 30— OFFICERS, ETC., IN SERVICE JANUARY 1926 

Name and Residence 

Superintendent and Secretary 

Salary 
Charles S. Clark, 75 Munroe Street $6,500 

Assistant Superintendent 
Everett W. Ireland, 138 Powder House Boulevard 3,300 



Clerks 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland Avenue 1,500 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria Street 1,350 

Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln Place 1,350 

Marion E. Marshall, 30 Gilman Street $21 per wk. 

Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Highland Avenue 21 per wk. 

Regina Truelson, 38 Rogers Avenue 19.50 per wk. 



Attendance Officer 

Benjamin R. Jones, 25 Loring Street 2,000 

Bernice F. Parker, Clerk, 11 Dickson Street $19 per wk. 

N.B. $100 increase granted to all teachers, to begin January 1, 1926, voted 
by School Committee February 15, 1926, is not included in above salary list. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



279 



TABLE 31— SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1926 



School 


Name 


High School, 


assistant 


Jeremiah M. Brennan 


High School, 


assistant 


John N. Quirk 


High School, 


assistant 


Joseph McCormack 


High School, 


assistant 


Charles Hoyt 


High School, 


assistant 


Thomas G. Pullen 


Prescott 




James J. Quirk 


Prescott 




Thomas E. Dickinson 


Hanscom 




Frank C. Martis 


Boys' Vocational 


Charles B. Kelley 


Bennett 




Michael Mullaney 


Baxter 




Jeremiah Sullivan 


Knapp 




Maurice T. Mullins 


Perry 




Dan'l E. Cunningham 


Pope 




John J. Kilty 


Southern Jun 


ior High 


William Meskill 


Southern Jun 


ior High 


Nicholas J. Lacey 


Cummings 




Lewis G. Keene 


Edgerly 




Charles P. Horton 


Glines 




Roy C. Burckes 


Northeastern 




Jeremiah J. Canniff 


Northeastern 




Anthony Farrington 


Northeastern 




John F. O'Connell 


Forster 




George W. Coombs 


Continuation 




Michael A. Mullin 


Bingham 




John F. O'Brien 


Carr 




John H. Lane 


Morse 




John W. Cremen 


Proctor 




Vincent J. Burke 


Durell 




Ellsworth C. Lundgren 


Burns 




Charles J. Elkins 


Brown 




James J. Cooper 


Highland 




Michael F. King 


Hodgkins 




Patrick A. Delmore 


Western Juni< 


or High 


James T. Eddy 


Western Junior High 


George A. Givan 


Cutler 




Thomas J. Flynn 


Cutler 




Walter F. Burns 


Lincoln 




John T. Morey 


Lowe 




Michael J. McKenna 



Weekly 

Residence Salary 

44 Radcliffe Rd. $28.50 

202 Somerville Ave. 27.50 

206 Washington 9t. 27.50 

60 Vernon St. 32.50 

6 Madison St. 27.50 
216-B Medford St. 30.00 

5 Berkeley St. 31.00 

79 Flint St. 29.00 

25 Clark St. 28.50 

7 Greene St. 30.50 
60 Newton St. 26.50 

13 Fremont Ave. 31.00 
15 Leland St. 26.50 

671 Somerville Ave. 30.50 

30 W T arren Ave. 32.50' 

327 Washington St. 32.50 

92 School St. 24.50 

26 Everett Ave. 30.50 
20 Jaques St. 31.50 

25% London St. 32.50 

15 Dimick St. 30.00 
18 Robinson St. 24.50 

196 Central St. 30.00 

16 Bowdoin St. 30.00 
335 Lowell St. 32.50 

5-A Belmont St. 36.50 

69 Oxford St. 31.00 

9 Homer Sq. 28.00 

93 Lowden Ave. 24.50 

14 Holyoke Road 28.00 
105 Willow Ave. 29.00 

25 Bowdoin St. 30.50 

11 Atherton St. 31.50 

34 Wallace St. 36.50 

17 Henrv Ave. 32.50 
4 Charles St. 27.50 

23 Avon S«t. 32.50 

1 Weston Ave. 24.50 

215 Washington St. 28.00 



280 A.NNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1926. 

To the Honorable, The Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen — 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, 
I submit herwith the annual report of the public buildings 
department for the year ending December 31, 1925. 

The total valuation of the property which is in the cus- 
tody of the public buildings department is approximately 
$4,355,000. 

The total expenditures for the year 1925 for the care 
and maintenance of this property was $238,526.11. 

This amount was expended as follows : 

Care and 

Janitors Fuel Light Repairs Total 

School Bldgs. $68,785 23 $32,860 40 $11,260 02 $58,417 52 $171,323 17 

Municipal Bldgs. 5,965 78 1,000 00 1,025 29 8,903 16 16,894 23 

Polling Places 9 88 5 67 558 70 574 25 

Police Bldgs. 2,485 79 573 21 1,015 89 992 34 5,067 23 

Eire Bldgs. 3,216 29 3,091 65 4,010 76 10,318 70 

Electrical Bldg. 1,118 00 701 33 28 77 73 89 1,921 99 

Contagious Hosp. 416 00 930 97 409 05 1,932 48 3,688 50 

Sewer Bldg. 40 76 78 30 101 94 221 00 

Sanitary Bldg. 104 72 198 05 215 74 518 51 

Highway Bldgs. 863 47 248 50 1,680 66 2,792 63 

City Home Bldgs 1,747 82 566 97 2,260 15 4,574 94 

Central Library 3,378 80 620 85 1,086 75 671 91 5,758 31 

W. Br'ch Library 1,493 49 427 68 356 20 598 61 2,875 98 

E. Br'ch Library 1,224 40 324 16 189 42 110 81 1,848 79 

Union Sq. Library 1,210 29 413 76 251 16 1,472 24 3,347 45 

Park Bldgs. 441 00 327 43 254 58 883 76 1,906 77 

Bathhouse 1,328 18 1,451 00 2,779 18 

Bandstand 285 57 285 57 

"Water Bldgs. 315 80 433 92 1,079 19 1,828 91 



Totals $87,846 96 $44,478 53 $20,500 19 $85,700 43 $238,526 11 

Inspection of Buildings 

The Commissioner of Public Buildings is also the in- 
spector of buildings according to the terms of the charter 
and as such during the past year has made over 3600 formal 
inspections of buildings in the process of construction. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



281 



The following table shows the number of permits issued 
for building operations during the year 1925 : — 



Buildings 

Dwellings 

Stores 

Dwellings & Stores. 

Garages 

Storage 

Manufactories 

Sheds 

Offices 

Stables 

Churches 

Gasoline Stations ... 

Restaurants 

Shops 

Bakery 

Bank 

Club House 

Theaters 

Museum 

Hospital 

Miscellaneous 

Torn Down 



Totals 



l 

96 

14 

3 

37 

10 

5 

1 

1 

1 



39 
9 
5 

53 

8 
2 
2 
1 



3 
36 
12 

2 
33 

4 



177 134 



4 

97 



WARDS 

4 

42 

6 
1 
30 
3 
3 
1 
4 
2 

i 
i 



5 
89 
8 
1 
56 
5 
1 



6 
67 
9 
3 
68 
4 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 



7 Totals 

78 447 



18 

118 
5 



76 

15 



39( 



39 
12 
5 
9 
3 
3 
8 
3 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
11 
29 



98 166 166 231 1,069 



New Buildings 
Alterations 



Wood 
142 
390 



Fire-resisting 
468 
40 



Totals 
610 
430 





532 






508 






L,040 


Buildings 
Wood 


l 
114 

1 

13 

3 

1 

30 
3 
1 

2 

*2 

6 

1 


2 
62 

ii 
i 

46 
6 

2 
6 


WARDS 

3 4 

49 56 

i i 

10 5 

1 1 

2 1 

31 30 
2 1 

1 .... 

.... 2 
1 


5 

94 
1 
1 
10 
2 
1 

45 
1 

i 
ib 


6 

84 

3 

8 

4 

i 

53 
2 

1 
9 
1 


7 1 

88 
1 
2 

13 
1 

5 

109 

2 

1 
7 

i 
1 


ota Is 

547 


Wood and Stucco 

Fire-Protected Wood 

Brick 


2 

9 

70 


Brick and Concrete 

Brick, Concrete & Wood 

Brick and Stone 

Cement Blocks 

Cement Block & Brick 

Cement Block & Wood 

Concrete 


8 
9 
1 
6 
344 
17 
1 
7 


Concrete & Cement Block ... 

Concrete & Steel 

Steel 


1 

2 

40 


Steel and Wood 

Steel and Copper 

Stone 


2 
1 

2 







Totals 



177 134 97 98 166 166 231 1069 



282 ANNUAL REPORTS 

The number of plumbing permits issued during 1925 was 519 

Number permits for plumbing in new buildings 287 

Number of permits for plumbing in old buildings 232 

Number of buildings in which soil pipes were tested 436 

The total estimated cost of new buildings and altera- 
tions during the year 1925 was 15,653,030.00, while the esti- 
mated cost in 1924 was $3,604,730.00, showing an increase 
of 12.048,300.00. 

The total number of permits issued during the year 1925, 
yiz 1069, was 14 less than during the year 1924, when 1083 
permits for new buildings and alterations were issued, show- 
ing a decrease of 1 per cent. 

There has been considerable speculative building of 
dwellings going on this year, or to be exact there were permits 
issued for 156 new dwellings housing 568 families. 

Single family houses have been altered into two family 
houses and some of the larger houses have been altered into 
small kitchenette suites. These types of alteration demand 
very careful inspection and supervision by this department 
and entail considerable more time than new construction. 

On September 1, 1918 the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville passed an ordinance requiring a fee to be 
collected for every building permit issued by this depart- 
ment. In accordance with this, fees collected for building 
permits during the year 1925 amounted to $3554.00. 

The Commissioner lias under his charge and direction 
the work of maintenance and upkeep of the eighty-four public 
buiildings of this City and the grounds in connection there- 
with, all janitors in the City's employ, a force of mechanics 
who perform the work of keeping the buildings in repair, 
the inspection of installation and care of all elevators, the 
supervision of construction of all new municipal buildings, 
the maintenance of the public bathing beach and public muni- 
cipal baths in the Bennett and Bingham Schools, and Lin- 
coln Park. 

The various activities in connection with the depart- 
ment work require a vast amount of time and attention in 
order to keep the property in proper condition for occupancy. 

The adoption of the new Fire Zoning and General Zon- 
ing Ordinance together with the new Building Ordinance 
just completed has added a considerable amount of labor to 
this already heavily burdened department. 



TOMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 283 

Every permit issued by this department must be governed 
by the above ordinances, which in itself, entails a great deal 
of study. 



Coal 

As in the past years an invitation was sent out for bids 
for supplying the necessary tonnage of both Anthracite and 
Bituminous coal for the city buildings for the winter of 1925 
and the spring of 1926. 

The contract for Bituminous coal was awarded to the 
Pratt Coal Company of Boston at a price less than the City 
of Boston secured, and the contract for Anthracite coal given 
to Colbert Brothers of Somerville. 

The above firms furnished a chemical analysis of the 
coal which they agreed to supply. A sample from each de- 
livery was sent to the Arthur D. Little Company for analysis. 

In anticipation of the coal srike in the Anthracite coal 
mines the Commissioner filled every available space in build- 
ings where Anthracite coal was used, and owing to this fore- 
sight the city departments have not felt the pressure of the 
strike that has effected other municipalities. 



Elevators 

According to an act of the Legislature, the Building 
Commissioner is required to have every elevator in the city 
inspected yearly, and a report of the conditions and neces- 
sary repairs made to the Public Safety Department, State 
House, Boston. 

Plans and specifications of all new installations of eleva- 
tors must be filed in this office and certificates of approval 
granted by the Commissioner. 

During the year 1925 there were 117 elevators inspected 
and 32 orders for repairs were sent out to concerns, covering 
70 elevators. 



School Buildings 

The maintenance and care of the school buildings has, 
as formerly, demanded the most vigilant attention from this 
department and the appropriation made for that purpose I 
believe has been expended carefully and judiciously. 



284 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Every year, before the summer vacation arrives, this 
department sends out blanks to be filled in by both the prin- 
cipals and janitors of the school buildings for all requisitions 
and repairs needed. 

These repairs and requests are taken up with the Super- 
intendent of Schools, and taken care of in the order which he 
suggests so far as the appropriation will allow. 

First Jare taken into consideration the requests and 
repairs absolutely needed for the opening of schools in the 
Fall. Then the others are taken up in the order of their im- 
portance. This in itself is a huge task as the wants of every 
section must be taken into consideration. 

There have been several additional school rooms opened 
since September 1st and new furniture had to be procured and 
set up to accommodate these additional classes. New office 
equipment for the offices of the High School and the Junior 
High Schools have been supplied during the past year. The 
opening of three additional kindergarden rooms necessitated 
the purchasing of complete furniture and equipment for these 
rooms. 

Room No. 104 in the High School, formerly use as a 
stock room, has been fitted up as a bank with all new equip- 
ment including safe making this department a model bank, 
equal in facilities to any banking rooms in the City. 

Lighting of School Buildings 

The most urgent need of the year is the lighting by 
electricity of the several older buildings in the city. 

The care of the pupils' eyesight is one of the most neces- 
sary things to be taken into consideration, and the Commis- 
sioner strongly recommends that the twenty school buildings 
which are not completely and properly lighted will be taken 
care of by a special appropriation covering cost of same. 

Fire Escapes 

Somerville has unfortunately several three story school 
buildings of the older type with stairs running from a com- 
mon hallway. 

The Bell, Prescott and Forster School buildings have 
been taken care of by enclosed fire stairways of non-com- 
bustible material, entirely separate from the building but ac- 
cesible from each floor. 

The Commissioner recommends that enclosed stairs of 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 285 

the same type be built on the Morse, Highland and Edgerly 
schools. 

The High School is now overcrowded and it will be neces- 
sary at a very early date to make addition to this building, 
or a new High School erected in the western part of the City. 

Whichever is done the present High School must be 
brought to the standard of the High Schools of today. A 
careful study of the building as a whole must be made and 
heating and ventilating system must be modernized. The 
present electric lighting of the class rooms is inadequate 
and new lighting facilities must be installed. 

A gymnasium is badly needed and as we must take as 
good of care of the physical condition of the children as of 
their mental training this must be included in the plans. 

The development of the Ten Hills Section and other 
parts of the Winter Hill section on the Mystic River side 
will mean an addition to the present Glines School or a 
new school in this section of the city. This should be look- 
ed into right away and land procured for same at once. 

School Yards 

During the past year the Durell, Southern Junior High, 
Morse, and part of the Hodgkins School yards have been fenc- 
ed with modern (Y chain wire fencing. This prevents the 
children, while at play, from running into roadway, there- 
by saving the possibility of accidents. It is the hope of the 
Commissioner to continue on this line and to erect several 
more such fences during the coming year. 

Several school yards were resurfaced with tarvia dur- 
ing the past year and in a few years we hope to be able to 
have every school yard covered with smooth surface free 
from dust and mud. 

Heating of Schools 

Several boilers have been retubed and otherwise repair- 
ed during the past year. 

I sincerely recommend a system of heat control be put 
into the High School, and the building of a new boiler room 
and modernizing of the heating equipment. This would en- 
tail a considerable saving of coal each year, and in a few 
years would pay for itself. 

Also the installation of a steam heating system at the 
Morse School doing away with the seven antiquated furnaces 
now in use. 



"286 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Blackboards 



Several of the buildings are equipped with paper black- 
boards, and the surfaces of same have to be renewed every 
year at a cost of several hundred dollars. I would recom- 
mend that slate blackboards be installed in place of paper 
blackboards, as the slate boards last indefinitely and the sav- 
ing on repairs would more than repay the cost of purchasing 
same. 



Fire Department Buildings 

There have been numerous repairs and improvements 
made in the fire buildings of the city. 

I urgently recommend that Engine No. Four building be 
replaced by a new one as it is in such bad shape that it 
•does not seem wise to spend much on repairs. As a fire sta- 
tion is needed in this vicinity, I recommend that this sta- 
tion be torn down and a new one built on less valuable land, 
and this lot sold for commercial purposes. Much of the ma- 
terial in the old building could be made use of in a new one. 

As the fire department is now all motorized it becomes 
necessary to alter many stations, putting cement floors in 
the apparatus rooms in place of the wood floors used for the 
old horse drawn vehicles, and the separation of the garage 
from the living quarters of the men. We have already start- 
ed along this line and expect to do considerably more dur- 
ing the coming year. 

Municipal Buildings 

The past year has seen the completion of City Hall. 
We now have a modern building housing the several depart- 
ments. New office equipment has been purchased during the 
past year to complete a modern and up to date equipment 
second to none in the state. 

The front end of City Hall Annex has been thoroughly 
renovated and equipped for School Committee and Depart- 
ment uses. The rear end of the building has been fitted 
up for the G. A. K.. Spanish War Veterans, and other pa- 
triotic uses. 

Libraries 

The most urgent need of the libraries at the present time 
is new lighting equipment. The Union Square Branch, East 
Somerville Branch and the children's room of the Central Li- 
brary must be fitted out with new lighting fixtures. The 
Commissioner hopes to do this at an early date. 



COMMISSIONER OF I'UBLIC BUILDINGS 287 

The exterior of both the West Branch Library and the 
Union Square Branch Library have been painted during the 
past year. 

WATER, HIGHWAY AND SANITARY BUILDINGS 
Water Buildings 

Considerable work has been done on the Water buildings 
during the past year. 

New drop ceilings have been installed, buildings paint- 
ed both inside and outside, and the electric wiring all over- 
hauled. 

Sanitary Buildings 

The Sanitary buildings are in need of considerable re- 
pairs. A new shed must be erected, and the receiving shed 
for garbage repaired. The Commissioner hopes to be able to 
make these additions and repairs during the coming year. 

Highway Buildings 

An addition to the Highway Garage has been made dur- 
ing the past year. Extension of present heating and light- 
ing systems installed. Many other minor but necessary re- 
pairs were made. 

Hospital 

During the past year a complete new refrigerating 
plant, satisfactory to the hospital authorities, has been in- 
stalled. The entire inside has been whitened, painted and 
varnished. Other minor repairs have been attended to. 

City Home 

Many reparis and the reshingling of buildings have been 
taken care of this year. A new chain wire fence has been 
built along the entire length of the Brodway side, and it is 
the intention of the Commissioner to continue this fence along 
the Boulevard side during the coming year. 

An addition must be built over office for two more sleep- 
ing rooms for help. A 500 gallon water tank for hot water 
must be installed with connections to steam boiler for winter 
use and with gas heater for summer use, to supply the needs 
of the hospital of this department. A new toilet for the help 
must be installed in the main house to replace antiquated 
and worn out one now in use. 



288 ANNUAL REPORTS 

A new boiler was installed in greenhouse and heating 
equipment overhauled. The boiler is large enough to take 
care of proposed addition to greenhouse. 

Police Buildings 

The Commissioner recommends that a new model Police 
Station be erected in a more central part of the city to take 
the place of the present station which is in a very bad con- 
dition. 

Park Buildings 

The completion of the Field House at Dilboy Field has 
filled a much needed want. The field house is fitted with 
shower baths and locker rooms for both boys and girls, toilet 
rooms for the public, electric lights, and modern heating and 
hot water equipment with an attendant in charge. 

Bath House 

The public bathhouse on the Mystic River at Wellington 
Bridge was opened and maintained as usual this year with 
a good attendance. 

About 150 tons of sand were purchased for resanding 
the beach. 

This particular recreation has been a great help to 
many mothers and children during the hot weather of the 
past season. It is a common sight to see mothers and child- 
ren arriving at the beach as early as nine o'clock with their 
lunches to spend the entire day. 

The attendance at the beach during the warm weather 
has sometimes exceeded 1,000 a day. 

Owing to the building of the new Ford plant and the 
changing of the storm drain it becomes necessary to move 
the Bathhouse. The Commissioner is hopeful of obtaining 
land at or near the old beach which is on the North side 
of the Parkway in rear of Ten Hills. If possible the Bath- 
house will be moved and ready for the opening June 17. 

In General 

The Building Commissioner has had the co-operation of 
all branches of the City Government, including His Honor, 
the Mayor, the honorable members of the Board of Aldermen 
and all the city officials, and desires to thank them for their 
kindly consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George L. Dudley, 
Commissioner of Public Buildings. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 289 



SUPPORT OF PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



Board of Public Welfare 

Fred E. Duegin, Chairman 
James D. Sharkey, Vice-Chairman 
George G. Brayley 

Committees 

On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home 
Mr. Burgin, Mr. Sharkey and Mr. Brayley 

Clerks 
Helen E. Linegar Margaret J. Preble 

General Agent 
William E. Copithorne 

City Physician 

Frank E. Bateman, M. D. 

Warden and Matron, City Home 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Colquhoun 

Office 

City Hall, Highland Avenue 



290 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Somerville, Mass., 

December 31, 1925. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: 

Gentlemen, — 

The Board of Public Welfare submit herewith reports 
of the General Agent, the Warden of the City Home and the 
City Physician, with tables showing the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fred E. Durgin, 

George G. Brayley, 

James D. Sharkey, 

Board of 

Public 

Welfare. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 291 



REPORT OF GENERAL AGENT 



City Hall, January 1, 1926 
To the Board of Public Welfare, Somerville, Mass. : — 

Gentlemen : — 

The following as the report of the general agent for 
the year ending December 31, 1925 is herewith submitted : — 

Table No. 1 

FULL SUPPORT (During the year) 

In City Home (men 36, women 30) 66 

In City Home, December 31, 1925 40 

In hospitals for the sick in other cities, towns and state 51 

Table No. 2 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (Outside Relief) 

Families 109 

Persons aided (including hospital cases) 537 

Burials 7 

Permits to State Infirmary 9 

Table No. 3 

CHILDREN 

In private families 17 

In care of state division of child guardianship 18 

Table No. 4 

AID UNDER 1913 LAW (Mothers' Aid) 

Number of mothers' aid cases, January 1, 1925 60 

Number of families aided at close of year 62 

Number of children 229 

Amount allowed each family, from $5.00 to $24.00 per week 

Number of out-of town families 10 

Number having no settlement 17 

Cost to City 

Somerville settlement $25,324 00 

Settled in other cities and towns (reside here) 3,370 00 

State 10,228 00 

Somerville families living in other cities and towns 4,249 99 



$43,171 99 



3,907 


73 


2,431 


31 


17 


24 


671 


61 


461 


63 


260 


00 


105 


76 


56 


00 


65 


00 


70 


00 


88 


00 


259 


94 


304 


50 


126 


00 


299 


00 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Table No. 5 
REIMBURSEMENTS 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $31,451 38 

City of Boston 

" " Cambridge 

" " Chelsea 

" Everett 

" Lynn 

" Medford 

" Newton 

" Woburn 

" Worcester 

Town of Lancaster 

" Plymouth 

" " Shrewsbury 

" Topsfield 

" Wakefield 

Individual 

$40,575 10 
Table No. 6 
SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL (City Patients) 

Patients having settlement in Somerville 59 

Patients having settlement in other cities and towns 19 

Patients having no settlement (chargeable to State) 19 

Total number of patients sent to hospital 97 

Amount paid to hospital $10,000 00 

Table No. 7 

POPULATION AND GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1900 to 1925 
Year 

1900 — *61,643 Misc. $23,697.62 Home, $5,528.83 Total $29,226.45 

1901 — 62,500 " 29,171.15 " 6,622.43 'I 35,793.58 

1902 — 63,500 " 28,667.04 " 7,396.64 " 36,063.68 

1903 — 65,500 " 30,470.20 " 7,548.39 " 38,018.59 

1904 — 69,500 " 20,476.64 " 6,563.11 " 27,039.65 

1905 — *69,272 " 17,527.88 " 7,474.36 " 25,002.24 

1906 — 72,000 " 18,237.53 " 6,806.79 " 25,044.32 

1907 — 74,000 " 17,852.20 " 7,001.23 " 24,853.43 

1908 — 75,500 " 17,955.34 " 6,875.56 " 24,830.90 

1909 — 75,500 " 16,843.17 M 7,562.83 " 24,406.00 

1910 — *77,236 " 16,110.42 " 7,695.89 " 23,806.31 

1911 — 78,000 " 16,327.56 " 7,842.03 " 24,169.59 

1912 — 81,000 " 19,201.33 " 8,998.97 " 28,200.30 

1913 — 82,000 " 21,827.73 " 10,945.95 " 32,773.68 

1914 — 85,000 " 35,619.68 " 11,200.25 " 46,819.93 

1915 — *86,854 " 45,490.98 " 11,218.65 " 56,709.63 

1916 — 90,000 " 51,759.62 " 11,593.41 " 63,353.03 

1917 — 90,000 " 53,653.33 " 13,417.77 " 67,071.10 

1918 — 90,500 " 63,420.48 " 15,411.20 " 78,831.68 

1919 — 91,000 " 67,682.53 " 15,789.34 " 83,471.87 

1920 — *93,033 " 77,456.57 " 17,308.29 " 94,764.86 

1921 — 95,000 " 87,922.69 " 15,069.81 " 102,992.50 

1922 — 97,000 " 95,510.92 " 13,577.07 " 109,087.99 

1923 — 98,000 " 88,909.21 " 14,770.97 " 103,680.18 

1924 —100,000 " 100,013.27 " 14,891.79 " 114,905.06 

1925 — *99,032 " 108,009.99 " 17,138.03 " 125,148.02 
♦Census 



Table No. 8 
EXPENDITURES IN DETAIL FOR THE YEAR 1925 



1925 


Board. 


Auto 
Mainte- 
nance 


Burials. 


Somerville 

Poor in 
other Cities 
and Towns. 


Cash 
Paid 
Out. 


Somerville 

Poor in 

other Cities 

and Towns 

1913 Law. 


Cash 
Allowance 


Dry Goods 
and 
Fuel 


Groceries. 


Other 
Institu- 
tions. 


Med. Att. 

and 
Medicine 


Nursing. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


Salaries. 


Somerville 
Hospital. 


State 
Institu- 
tions. 


All Other. 


Telephone. 


Totals 


January 

February 

March 


$1,000.57 

88.00 

887.87 

72.85 

86.71 

939.11 

101.84 

101.84 

212.83 

1,117.63 

119.99 

123.98 


$12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
29.14 
16.66 
16.66 
16.66 
16.66 
16.66 
16.66 
16.66 
16.74 


$ 75.00 


$542.22 
783.12 


$6,600.50 
5,214.80 
5,289.00 
5,152.50 
6,561.00 
5,105.09 
5.204.10 


$ 


$64.22 
58.00 
64.22 
62.14 
64.22 
45.00 
46.51 
46.51 
45.00 
56.51 
66.43 
68.65 


$ 49.91 


$231.00 

135.35 

144.00 

122.00 

72.00 

180.00 

84.00 

83.00 

54.00 

99.12 

117.70 

79.99 


$ 


$ 4.20 
27.11 
20.17 
11.78 
27.25 
31.04 
10.60 
22.92 
18.31 
24.02 
17.60 
20.77 


$ 


$ 1.70 

4.00 

14.50 

13.50 

3.00 
25.98 
14.50 

2.50 
12.75 
16.40 


$611.46 
567.74 
567.74 
567.74 
661.76 
617.74 
530.74 
724.72 
567.74 
661.76 
567.74 
633.08 


$833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.37 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 


$404.29 


$12.00 
5.00 


$10.49 

10.24 

10.39 

9.39 

10.79 

10.84 

9.79 

8.64 

8.51 

10.04 

10.26 

10.71 


$10,453.39 
7,739.19 
9,008.67 

10,166.59 
8,763.22 
8,694.56 
8,970.95 
8,487.42 
7,186.31 

11,547.75 
8,003.26 








50.00 
73.00 


1,050.66 




64.29 
15.25 






April 


2,773.62 
180.72 
144.05 

1,719.79 






430.35 




May 


230.53 
634.80 


1.75 


6.50 


10.00 

18.00 
18.00 


June 


47.00 
25.00 


86.86 




July 


1.55 




343.06 


August 


65.00 H.KRZ.an 








September . . . 




100.00 
427.69 
738.75 
387.36 


5,306.00 
6,558.50 
5,448.40 
5,675.40 






21.43 






October 




1,195.33 






534.41 




November . . . 







50.00 






December.... 


1,138.67 










8,988.68 
















Totals 


$4,853.22 


$200. 


$270.00 


$7,862.32 


$68,667.59 


$4,249.99 


$687.41 


$53.21 


$1,402.16 


$237.83 


$235.77 


$6.50 


$108.83 


$7,279.96 


$10,000.00 


$1,712.11 


$63.00 


$120.09 


$108,009.99 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



•2<K 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OF SOMERVILLE 



Since the reorganization in 1885 



tHon. Mark F. Burns, chairman, ex-offico 
tCol. Herbert E. Hill .... 
fCharles S. Lincoln, Esq., chairman 
tHon. Edward Glines .... 
fCharles G. Brett (president 1888-1892) 
tEdward B. West (president May, 1894 

February 1912) 
fDaniel C. Stillson .... 
tHon. Charles G. Pope, chairman ex-officio 
tNathan H. Reed (president 1893 to April 

1894) 

tHon. William H. Hodgkins, chairman 

ex-officio. .... 
tJames G. Hinckley . . May 
tAlbert W. Edmands . . . May 
tHerbert E. Merrill . . . May 
tEzra D. Souther .... 
Hon. Albion A. Perry, chairman ex-officio 
tJames H. Butler . . . March 
Hon. George O. Proctor, chairman ex- 
officio 

Henry F. Curtis, M. D. (president 1912- 

1919) 

Philip Koen 

tMichael Coll . . . November 
*Fred E. Durgin (chairman 1919 to 

date) Oct. 

♦George G. Brayley . . . Jan. 
♦James D. Sharkey . . . Dec. 



1885 


1888 


inclusive 


1885 


1889 


it 


1885 


1887 


•• 


1885 


1887 


(• 


1885 Apr. 


1893 


<< 


1888 


1912 


M 


1888 Apr. 


1892 


(l 


1889 


1891 


(( 


1890 Apr. 


1894 


<• 



1892 1895 

1892 1894 

1893 Oct. 1918 

1894 1909 

1895 Feb. 1898 

1896 1898 
1898 1899 

1899 

1910 1921 
1912 Nov. 1916 
1916 Dec. 1924 



1918 


date 


1922 


date 


1924 


date 



Table No. 9 

RECAPITULATION (Miscellaneous) 

Expenditures and transfers $108,009 99 

Reimbursements and refunds 40,946 10 

Net cost to city $67,063 89 

* Present member 
t Deceased 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. E. CopithornEj 

General Agent. 



294 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOME 

City Home, January 1, 1926 

To the Board of Public Welfare, Somerville, Mass. : — 

Gentlemen : — 

I submit the following as the report of the Warden of 
the City Home for the year ending December 31, 1925 : — 

Table No. 1 

Number of weeks' board of inmates 2253 

Number of males admitted during 1925 11 

Number of females admitted during 1925 10 

Number of males discharged during 1925 9 

Number of females discharged during 1925 5 

Number of males supported during 1925 36 

Number of females supported during 1925 30 

Number of males died during 1925 6 

Number of females died during 1925 4 

Number of inmates in home December 31, 1925 40 

Table No. 2 

Reimbursements $7,384 60 

Net expenditures 9,753 43 

$17,138 03 

Appropriation and transfers , 17,138 03 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Foster Colquhoun, 

Warden. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 29& 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN 



Somerville, January I, 1926 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — 

The work of your City Physician during the year 1925 
is presented in the following abstract : — 

Office consultations and treatments 238 

Total outside visits 769 

Confinements 4 

Vaccinations 21 

Visits at City Home 172 

Attended at Police Station 37 

Examinations : — 

For legal department 20 

For police department 13 

For fire department 13 

For soldiers' relief department 4 

For sanitary department 1 

For sewer department 1 

For pension 8 

Much of the important work of the city physician, such 
as attendance at hearings, conferences and the like, does not 
admit of tabulation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Bateman, 

City Physician. 



.296 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Somerville: 

The annnal report of the law department for the year 
ending December 31, 1925, is as follows : 

An act was secured from the legislature giving the city 
council of Somerville the powers and authority of park com- 
missioners under the provisions of sections 3 and 14 of chap 
ter 45 of the General Laws, thereby probably making it un- 
necessary for the city hereafter to secure special acts for the 
establishment and control of parks and playgrounds. 

The metropolitan district commission in October made 
a taking of lands in East Cambridge and Somerville for the 
Northern Traffic Artery, so-called, under the provisions of 
chapter 489 of the acts of 1924 as amended by chapter 319 of 
the acts of 1925. The act provides that when the work has 
T)een completed the part in Somerville shall become a public 
street of this city. The route of the new way is as follows : 
Beginning at the Cambridge end of the Cambridge bridge, 
thence running along the Charles river basin to the Charles 
river dam ; thence along Bridge street through East Cam- 
bridge to Somerville avenue; thence along Somerville avenue 
to Medford street ; thence along Medford street across Wash- 
ington street to the westerly end of Chester avenue near the 
central fire station ; thence across private lands and the loca- 
tion of the Boston and Maine Railroad, Southern Division 
to Broadway nearly opposite Fellsway East ; thence along 
Fellsway East to Mystic avenue. The width will be about 
one hundred feet. The act provides that twenty-five per cent 
of the cost shall be borne by the commonwealth and that 
three-fourths of the cost shall be paid by the cities and towns 
specially benefited in such manner as a commission to be 
appointed by the supreme judicial court shall determine. 

In January the supreme court rendered a decision re- 
lating to the authority of a school committee in a city to fix 
the salaries of teachers in the public schools and relating to 



LAW DEPARTMENT 297 

the appropriation for that purpose by the city government. 
At the request of the school committee I gave opinions in 
reply to several questions on this subject. 

An attempt by the city of Woburn to secure legislation 
that would require the construction of a large drain in that 
city at the expense of the metropolitan sewerage district was 
opposed and the general subject matter was referred to the 
metropolitan district commission. A report has recently 
been made by the commission adverse to the claims of the 
city of Woburn. 

A zoning ordinance prepared by experts who were em- 
ployed by the city was examined in detail by members of 
the planning board and members of the legislative committee 
of the board of aldermen and mj^self and after being changed 
in many important respects was enacted by the city govern- 
ment. 

The subject of an extension of the metropolitan water 
district will soon be before the legislature on a report by a 
special investigating commission appointed under chapter 491 
of the acts of 1924. This district includes nineteen muni- 
cipalities of which Somerville ranks next to Boston in amount 
of assessment for expenses. The nature and cost of the ex- 
tension and the method of apportioning the cost will be im- 
portant matters for all the municipalities concerned. 

A report made to me by Ralph M. Smith, Esq., as as- 
sistant in this department, is submitted herewith as a part of 
this report. 

Yours very respectfully, 

Frank W. Kaan, 

City Solicitor. 



298 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF RALPH M. SMITH, FOR THE YEAR 1925 
Street Accident Notices 

Pending December 22, 1924 184 

New Notices 27 

Disposed of and settled 143 

Pending December 31, 1925 57 

A large number included under the disposed of and 
settled item is because of the fact that I have removed from 
the tiles all those notices which are over two years old and 
on which legal proceedings have not been brought, there be- 
ing one hundred twenty-eight under this list, the remaining 
fifteen being cases which were settled. 

All of the pending notices have been investigated, in 
fact, during the last year the investigation has been much 
more satisfactory than at the time of my last report. I think 
now that the cases are in fairly good shape considering the 
amount of appropriation that I have to work with. 

Street Accident Cases in Superior Court 

Pending December 22, 1924 17 

New cases entered 12 

Disposed of and settled 12 

Cases pending December 31, 1925 17 

Two of the cases disposed of represent cases that went 
to the Supreme Court on report of the presiding Judge, one 
of which being determined in favor of the City and the other 
in favor of the plaintiff. One other case was tried out before 
a Jury and a verdict of $3000 rendered against the City 
against which there is now pending a motion for new trial 
not yet disposed of. 

On the pending cases in addition to the investigation 
made by the Claims Inspector I have filed interrogatories 
in each case and have secured all the information by this 
method. One case has been non-suited as the result of failure 
to answer interrogatories. 

Title Examination 
One title on Fairlee Street, Somerville, was examined. 

Opinions • 

Seventeen written opinions have been prepared and sub- 
mitted to various department heads. 



LAW DEPARTMENT 299 

Collection Matters 

Pending December 22, 1924 76 

Received 41 

Disposed of and settled 37 

Pending December 31, 1925 80 

Twelve suits have been entered on collection matters, 
two of which are still pending in Court. There are also two 
suits pending against other cities and towns for disposition 
of Contagious Hospital and Public Welfare cases. 

Ralph M. Smith. 



•> 



00 ANNUAL REPORTS 

REPORT OF THE 
SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Office of Sealer of Weights and Measures. 
City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1926. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

The following report of the Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures for the year 1925 is respectfully submitted: — 

Work of Weights and Measures Department for 1925 

Non- Con- 
Adjusted Sealed Sealed demned 

Platform over 5000 capacity — 43 — — 

Platform under 5000 capacity 12 408 10 6 

Counter 9 669 3 21 

Spring 6 722 7 37 

Computing 1 539 10 19 

Slot Personal Weighing — 63 — — 

Prescription — 28 — 1 

Beam 1 29 1 — 

Weights 

Avoirdupois 63 3936 — 8 

Apothecary — 457 — 19 

Metric — 121 — — 

Troy — 21 — — 

Capacity Measures 

Dry — 44 — — 

Liquid — 888 — 50 

Gasoline Pumps — 191 12 4 

Oil Pumps — 105 263 3 

Molasses Pumps — 34 3 1 

Yard Sticks — 170 — 36 

Wood Baskets — 25—6 

Cloth Measuring Devices — 2 — — 

Taxi Meters — 13 — — 



Total 92 9329 309 205 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



301 



Inspections other than sealing: 

Number of scales and measures in stores 

Number of Pedlers' scales 

Number of Junk scales 

Number of Ice scales 

Number of Gasoline devices 

Number of Pedlers' Licenses 



302 

65 

3 

23 

68 

148 



Condemned for repairs or replacement on road: 

Number of scales inspected and C D 

Number repaired or replaced and sealed 
Number not reported ready for sealing .. 



126 
118 



Condemned for repairs or replacement at office: 

Number of scales inspected and C D 

Number repaired or replaced and sealed . 
Number not reported ready for sealing ... 



79 
69 
10 



Gasoline Station Tests: 

Total number of calls 

Number of different stations 

Number of call backs to stations previously in- 
spected 

Total number of gallons of gas drawn for tests 

Average gallons of gas drawn per pump 

Total number of pumps inspected 

Number of pumps sealed 

Number of pumps N. S 

Number of Pumps C D 

Total number of oil pumps 

Number of oil pumps sealed 

Number of oil pumps non-sealed 



145 
101 

44 

6911 

33V4 

207 

191 

12 

4 

334 

75 

259 



Summary of tests and inspections: 

Total 
Number 

Loaves of Bread 140 

Packages of Butter 34 

Coal in paper bags 99 

Confectionery 20 

Dry Commodity 789 

Bags of Flour 61 

Fruits and Vegetables 178 

Grain and Feed 19 

Ice 9 

Meats and Provisions 10 

Wood by Cord 1 

Coal in Transit 3 

Total 1363 



Correct 


Under 


Over 


51 


22 


67 


31 


2 


1 


47 


17 


35 


17 


3 


— 


490 


238 


61 


34 


24 


3 


41 


106 


31 


17 


2 


— 


2 


4 


3 


10 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


3 


— 



740 



422 



201 



302 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Other Inspections: 

Marking of Bread 112 

Paper or Fibre Cartons 350 

Cartons Approved as Measures 974 

Milk Jars 560 

Wholesale Milk Cans 350 

Metal Ice Cream Containers ... ? , 573 

Coal Certificates 3 

Stone Certificates 3 

Weighing of Coal in Transit 3 

Weighing of Stone in Transit 3 

Taximeters 10 

Miscellaneous: 

Complaints Investigated 8 

Court Cases 3 

Total Number Licenses Issued 319 

Amount paid City Treasurer for Pedlers' Licenses 988 

Amount paid City Treasurer as Sealing Fees 830.72 

The taximeter course of two miles has been laid out on 
Highland Avenue, and is in full working operation. The 
course is marked with brass plates in curb stone at intervals 
of t — t — t — t — f — 1 mi. After giving the taximeter the road 
test of 4 miles, if the meter registers correctly, then there is 
a time test of one half hour of three minute intervals, and 
if this test is correct then the meter is sealed, both as to time 
and mileage. 

The deficiency in package goods, was very slight due to 
shrinkage, and the practice of putting up goods too far ahead 
was discouraged by the Weights and Measures Department. 

There were three cases brought to the attention of the 
court, and fines imposed ; short weight of ice, f 25 ; inaccurate 
scale, flO : and peddling without license, if 10. 

As much time as could be given in between other duties 
was given over to inspection of package goods in stores, the 
reweighing showed a better percentage of correct weight than 
the previous year, we also find scales and weighing devices 
are kept in better condition, and more attention paid to their 
operation. 

The department wishes to extend an invitation to the 
public to call and see the equipment used in our work, and 
to see what effort is made for the protection of the people of 
Somerville. And we will also be only too glad to explain 
any matter relative to weights and measures. 

B. S. Abbott, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



LICENSING COMMISSION 



REPORT OF LICENSING COMMISSION 



January 25, 192C>. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen : 

The Licensing Commission respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing report for the year 1925. The Commission has follow- 
ed its established policy with reference to the matters within 
its jurisdiction and has kept in close touch with the office 
of the State Fire Marshal regarding garages in new develpo- 
ments in the city and changing types of construction. 

There has been no increase in the number of establish- 
ments operating with Lord's Day Licenses at all incompati- 
ble with the changing conditions and rising growth in pop- 
ulation. 

The Commission desires to acknowledge its appreciation 
of the confidence placed in and the many courtesies extended 
to it by Mayor John M. Webster, its activities having been 
thereby rendered pleasant to perform. The Commission also 
wishes to acknowledge the splendid co-operation of other de- 
partments of the City Government connected with its opera- 
tion. 

Applications were received and acted upon by the Com- 
mission as follows : 

Garage Licenses 

423 Applications received. 
385 Licenses granted and issued. 
28 Applications leave to withdraw. 
1 Application no action necessary. 

9 Applications laid over to 1926. 



304 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Lord's Day Licenses 

318 Applications received. 

273 Licenses granted and issued. 

8 Transfers of location granted. 
34 Applications leave to withdraw. 

1 Transfer of location leave to withdraw. 

1 Application laid over to 1926. 

1 Transfer of location laid over to 1926. 



Fees for the above licenses granted and issued, amount- 
ing to #2,125.00 were paid over to the City Treasurer. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Eugene M. Carman, Chairman 

Wm. H. Smith, 

Wm. J. Shanahan, 

Licensing Commission. 

Attest : 

R. A. KeyeSj 
Secretary. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 305 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville, Mass. — 

Gentlemen : — I respectfully submit the annual report 
of the Somerville police department, for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1925. 

Arrests 

Whole number of arrests made 3,118 

With and without warrants 2,620 

On summons and notification 498 

3,118 

Males 2,981 

Females 137 

3,118 

Americans 2,140 

Foreign born 978 

3,118 

Residents 1,992 

Non-residents 1,126 



1, — Crimes and Offenses Against the person. 

Assault with intent to murder 2 

Assault and battery 150 

Assaults and assault and battery on officers 3 

Assaults with dangerous weapon 3 

Carnal abuse of female child 1 

Larceny from person 2 

Murder 1 

Rape, attempt 1 

Robbery and robbery, attempt 24 

Threats 7 



2, — Crimes and Offenses Against Property. 

Arson 1 

Breaking and entering 25 

Breaking and entering, attempt 7 

Breaking and entering and larceny 39 



3,118 



194r 



306 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Breaking glass 

Concealment of property 

Injury to property 

Larceny 

Larceny in building 

Larceny, attempt 

Malicious mischief 

Setting fires 

Receiving stolen goods 

Trespass 

Unlawfully diverting electricity 



9 

2 

6 

122 

4 

5 

2 

2 

11 

27 

1 



263 



3, — Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order, Etc. 

Abandonment of children 3 

Adultery 8 

Bail surrender 2 

Capais 13 

Contempt of court 3 

Cruelty to animal 1 

Default 27 

Deserter, United States Navy 1 

Desertion of minor children 2 

Desertion of wife 2 

Disturbing the peace 6 

Disturbing a public assembly 12 

Dog keeping, unlicensed 3 

Drunkenness 1,350 

Drunkenness, common 13 

Escaped prisoner 1 

Forgery 1 

Fugitive from justice 4 

Gaming nuisance 2 

Gaming, present at 7 

Giving false alarm of fire 3 

Indecent exposure of person 4 

Impure print, in possession of 2 

Indictments 6 

Lewd cohabitation 6 

Lottery, promoting 1 

Neglected children 7 

Neglect to support 114 

Peddling, unlicensed 1 

Safe keeping, alcoholism 1 

Safe, keeping, demented 21 

Safe keeping, escaped prisoners 3 

Safe keeping, escaped insane inmates 3 

Safe keeping, feeble minded 4 

Safe keeping, revoke and violation of parole 7 

Safe keeping, runaways 8 

Safe keeping, runaways from Lyman School 3 

Stragglers from United States Navy 3 

Stubbornness 17 

Suspicious persons 4 

Vagrancy 6 

Unlawfully riding on freight cars 2 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



.307 



Violation of city ordinances 

Violation of health regulations 

Violation of illegitimate child act 

Violation of labor laws 

Violation of liquor laws 

Violation of Lord's Day 

Violation of medical laws 

Violation of milk laws 

Violation of motor vehicle laws 

Violation of narcotic drug laws 

Violation and revoke of parole 

Violation of terms of probation 

Violation of school laws 

Violation of weight and measure laws 
Weapons, carrying without permit ... 
Witnesses 



76 

3 

18 

31 

256 

92 

2 

5 

403 

2 

14 

41 

16 

2 

6 

7 



2,661 



Recapitulation 

(1) Crimes and Offenses Against the Person .... 

(2) Crimes and Offenses Against Property 

(3) Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order, 

etc r 

Total number of arrests made 

Bailed to appear elsewhere 

Cases in which nolle prosequi was entered and 

dismissed 

Released by probation officer, drunkenness 

Keleased from custody 

Surrendered to court, other officers insitutions, 

etc 

Witnesses 



Number of cases held for trial 



194 
263 

2,661 



22 

41 

10 

3 

258 
7 



3,118 



341 



2,777 



NOTE: — Two hundred and thirty-four of the above number of 
cases were juveniles and delinquents. 



Miscellaneous Reports 

Abandoned automobiles 108 

Accidents reported 1,264 

Amount of property stolen $166,129 63 

Amount of stolen property recovered 259,711 17 

Amount of property damaged 325 75 

Amount of property lost 593 95 

Amount of property found 79 18 

Assault and battery, assaults and attempts 37 

Attempt to commit arson 1 

Attempts to break and enter 84 

Attempts to commit larceny 18 

Attempts to commit suicide 9 

Breaking and entering, false alarm of 2 

Buildings broken and entered, nothing stolen .... 75 



308 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Buildings found open 526 

Cable box open 1 

Dead animals found 13 

Defective bridges 17 

Defective buildings 3 

Defective catch basins and sewers 21 

Defective drinking fountains 7 

Defective electric lamps 7 

Defective fences and railings 6 

Defective fire alarm box 1 

Defective gas and water gate boxes 79 

Defective hydrants 12 

Defective poles and posts 11 

Defective police signal service 17 

Defective sidewalks 428 

Defective signs and sign posts 184 

Defective streets 132 

Defective streets, lighted 3 

Defective United States mail boxes 3 

Defective wires 39 

Demented persons 2 

Disturbances 22 

Dogs killed 45 

Dogs vicious 10 

Fire, alarms given for 4 

Fire, extinguished without alarm 1 

Fire, false alarms of . 38 

Fire, needless alarms for 7 

Fires reported 275 

Gas leaks , 6 

Gas Poisoning 4 

Heat prostrations 2 

Horses killed 2 

Houses unoccupied 71 

Indecent exposure of person 9 

Infirm person 1 

Larcenies, no value given 339 

Larcenies 779 

Lodgers 4 

Lost children ..... 274 

Lost children, found 274 

Malicious mischief 39 

Missing persons 106 

Missing persons, found 102 

Obstructions on sidewalks and streets 48 

Obstructions on sidewalks and streets, lighted 5 
Obstructions on sidewalks and streets, not light- 
ed 2 

Panes of glass broken 212 

Permits issued to carry fire-arms 261 

Permits to labor on Lord's Day 96 

Persons bitten by dogs 32 

Persons helped home 2 

Persons rescued , 7 

Property damaged and destroyed 105 

Property lost, no value given 76 

Property found, no value given 110 

Robbery, and attempts to rob 42 



CHIEF OF POLICE 309 



Runaway children 24 

Runaway children, found 26 

Runaway teams 3 

Sidewalks and streets dangerous from snow 

and ice 65 

Sidewalks, streets and subways flooded 16 

Still born infant found 1 

Stray bullets fired 2 

Stray dogs and other animals 127 

Stray dogs and other animals, found 66 

Stray herd of cattle 1 

Stray herd of cattle, found 1 

Stray teams 2 

Stray teams, found 5 

Street lights reported 2,656 

Sudden death 1 

Suicides 3 

Summonses served for witnesses and defendants 

to appear in court at other places 925 

Suspicious persons 154 

Threats 1 

Trees dangerous 29 

Trespass and wilful trespass 38 

Unconscious persons 2 

Violation of city ordinances 197 

Violation of health regulations 3 

Violation of Lord's Day 5 

Violations of motor vehicle laws 4 

Violation of narcotic drug laws 1 

Water pipes leaking 136 

Windows broken 45 



310 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OFFICIAL ROSTER OF DEPARTMENT 

Chief of Police 
Charles A. Kendall 

Caotain 

Eugene A. Carter 



James M. Harmon 
John A. Ray 
Thomas Damery 



Lieutenants 



Michael T. Kennedy 
Ernest Howard 



Prank H. Graves 
James M. Lynch 
William G. Kenney 



Sergeants 



Robert T. Blair 
Thomas P. Walsh 
Charles J. Sharry 



Patrolmen 



1 — Edward M. Carter 

2 — Theodore E. Heron 

3 — Daniel G. Simons 

4 — Samuel Burns 

5 — John A. Dadmun 

6 — George L. Rice 

7 — Myron S. Gott 

8 — Charles W. Reick 

9 — Frank C. Hopkins 

10 — Sanford S. Lewis 

11 — Henry A. Sudbey 

12 — Thomas F. McNamara 

13 — Louis F. Arnold 

14 — Charles S. Johnston 

15 — Claude L. Crossman 

16 — John J. Cummings 

17 — Edmund J. Keane 

18 — Denis Downey 

19 — Edward M. Davies 

20 — George A. C. Peters 

21 — Louis J. Belzarini 

22 — Walter Reed 

23 — Dennis G. Mulqueeney 

24 — Patrick J. Doolin 

25 — Edward J. Hopkins 

26 — Walter L. Groves 

27 — Joseph A. Dwyer 

28 — Augustine J. Fitzpatrick 

29 — Patrick McGrath 

30 — Bernard McCabe 

31 — Harry C. Young 

32 — Robert D. Dewar 



43 — John J. Killourhy 

44 — Thomas M. Sharry 

45 — Michael J. O'Loughlin 

46 — Charles W. Shepherd 

47 — John J. Shay 

48 — Edward G. Butman 

49 — John P. L. O'Keefe 

50 — Alfred E. Robitaille 

51 — Allan S. Burns 

52 — William H. Donovan 

53 — George R. Allen 

54 — Jeremiah Keniry 

55 — James Murray 

56 — Charles J. Fulton 

57 — Edward F. Culliton 

58 — Alfred J. McFadden 

59 — James A. Fitzpatrick 

60 — Elmer E. G. Raymond 

61 — Frank J. Roche 

62 — Augustine F. Sharry 

63 — Daniel M. O'Connell 

64 — Chester F. Warner 

65 — George D. MacDonald 

66 — Charles F. Lacey 

67 — William E. Dwyer 

68 — Charles H. McAvoy 

69 — James F. Holmes 

70 — Earle W. Elliott 

71 — Michael J. Dowd, Jr. 

72 — Patrick J. Lyons 

73 — Thomas A. Donovan 

74 — Thomas J. Flanagan 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



311 



Patrolmen, continued 



33 — Peter Moore 

34 — Albert C. Hawes 

35 — Walter C. Oesting 

36 — John L. Cameron 

37 — Francis P. Higgins 

38 — John J. McCahey 

39 — Alexander Morrison 

40 — Daniel J. Powers 

41 — Jeremiah O'Connor 

42 — Timothy Buckley 



75 — Timothy J. Corckery 

76 — Henry W. Roche 

77 — John H. Baker 

78 — John J. Courtney 

79 — Pierce P. Ronayne 

80 — Joseph P. Blake 

81 — Frank A. Silva, Jr. 

82 — John J. Smith 

83 — Dennis F. Kearney 

84 — LeRoy V. Pierce 



85 — Francis R. Begley 

86 — Francis X. Cavanagh 

87 — Joseph F. Small 

88 — Edward G. Forristall 

89 — August S. Cidado 



Reservemen 



90 — Hugh R. Cunningham 

91 — James Souza 

92 — Garnett L. Reid 

93 — Jeremiah F. Donovan 



Chauffeurs and Patrol Drivers 



1 — James W. Lundergan 

2 — John H. McKenzie 



3 — William R. Burnett 

4 — George R. Estee, Jr. 



Matron 

Mrs. Mina T. Weeks 

Assistant Matron 

Mrs. Katherine Wood 



Pensioners Retired on Half Pay 



Ira S. Carleton, patrolman 
James J. Pollard, patrolman 
Herbert Hilton, patrolman 
Ezra A. Dodge, patrolman 
George H. Carleton, sergeant 
Frederick H. Googins, patrolman 
Jacob W. Skinner, patrolman 
Elmer E. Drew, patrolman 
Ernest S. Goff, patrolman 
Charles W. Allen, patrolman 
Charles E. Woodman, lieutenant 
Frederick G. Jones, patrolman 
Francis A. Perkins, patrolman 
Charles E. Wilson, patrolman 
Hudson M. Howe, patrolman 



May 9, 1907 

Feb. 27, 1908 

Dec. 21, 1911 

Mar. 14, 1914 

Mar. 27, 1914 

Mar. 12, 1915 

Dec. 31, 1917 

July 25, 1918 

July 11, 1919 

Mar. 26, 1920' 

June 24, 1921 

Feb. 9, 1923 

Apr. 25, 1924 

Aug. 7, 1925 

Sept. 14, 1925, 



312 ANNUAL REPORTS 

CHANGES IN THE FORCE. 

Resignations 

Chauffeur and Patrol Driver, James H. White, resigned to take ef- 
fect Jan. 31, 1925. 

Patrolman Alfred S. Macomber, resigned to take effect Mar. 12, 1925. 

Reserveman Edmond F. Flynn, resigned to take effect Apr. 23, 1925, 
while charges were pending against him. 

Reserveman Eugene M. Canty, resigned to take effect Dec. 10, 1925, 
never having served. 



Reinstatement. 

Earl W. Elliott, reinstated as patrolman Apr. 27, 1925. 

Retirements. 

Patrolman Charles E. Wilson, retired and placed on pension at half 

pay Aug. 7, 1925. 
Patrolman Hudson M. Howe, retired and placed on pension at half 

pay Sept. 14, 1925. 

Discharges. 

Patrolman Leo J. Hurley, discharged after hearings, to date from 

Sept. 26, 1925. 
Patrolman John F. Cruise, discharged after hearings, to date from 

Oct. 31, 1925. 

Death. 

Hetired pensioner Jotham Chisholm, died Dec. 18, 1925. 

Promotions. 

Heserveman, Joseph P. Blake, promoted to patrolman Apr. 10, 1925. 
Heserveman, Frank A. Silva, Jr., promoted to patrolman Apr. 11, 1925. 
Reserveman, John J. Smith, promoted to patrolman Apr. 11, 1925. 
Reserveman, Dennis F. Kearney, promoted to patrolman Oct. 16, 1925. 
Reserveman, LeRoy V. Pierce, promoted to patrolman Oct. 17, 1925. 

Appointments. 

Francis X. Cavanagh,, appointed as reserveman Apr. 27, 1925. 

Joseph F. Small, appointed as reserveman Apr. 27, 1925. 

Edward G. Forristall, appointed as reserveman Apr. 27, 1925. 

August S. Cidado, appointed as reserveman Apr. 27, 1925. 

Hugh R. Cunningham, appointed as reserveman Apr. 25, 1925. 

James Souza, appointed as reserveman Oct. 24, 1925. 

Garnett L. Reid, appointed as reserveman Oct. 23, 1925. 

Eugene M. Canty, appointed as reserveman Nov. 28, 1925 (resigned 

Dec. 10, 1925.) 
Jeremiah F. Donovan, appointed as reserveman Dec. 14, 1925. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 313 

Police Signal Service. 

Number of on duty calls made by the officers and patrol- 
men 277,172 

Telephone calls made by the officers and patrolmen 49,168 



White Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station 90 

Number of prisoners conveyed 114 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 598 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 195.5 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 2,030.5 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail 103.0 

Number of miles run elsewhere 963.0 



Total number of miles run during the year 3,292.0 



New White Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 19 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 69.0 

Number of miles run elsewhere 28.8 



Total number of miles run during the year 97.8 



Reo Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners 

to station 1,121 

Number of prisoners conveyed 1.498 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 19 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 2,532.9 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 134.7 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail 1,051.1 

Number of miles run elsewhere 1,328.1 



Total number of miles run during the j^ear 5,046.8 



Touring Cars Reports. 

Number of prisoners conveyed to station 126 

Number of sick and injured conveyed 15 

Number of trips to jail conveying prisoners 8 



314 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE LIQUOR SQUAD. 

Charles A. Kendall, 
Chief of Police. 

Dear Sir: — The following will show the amount of work per- 
formed by the liquor officers for the year ending Dec. 31, 
1925. 

Cases investigated 379 

Search warrants served 239 

Arrests. 

Illegal sales of liquor 109- 

Keeping and exposing liquor for sale 102 

Illegal transportation of liquor 13 

Illegal manufacture of liquor 8 

Illegal gaming 50 

Lottery 1 

Total 283 

Fines. 

Liquor fines paid in District Court of Somerville $16,700 00 

Gaming fines paid in District Court of Somerville 810 00 

Promoting a lottery fines in District Court of Som- 

ville 50 00 

Violations of motor vehicle laws fines paid in District 

Court of Somerville 40 00 

Liquor fines paid in Superior Court 4,575 00 

Gaming fines paid in Superior Court 50 00 

Violation motor vehicle laws paid in Superior Court 100 00 

$22,325 00 

Sale of junk etc., from raids 236 61 

Disposition of cases in District Court of Somerville. 

Suspended sentences, 6 months each (see foot note) 15- 
Sentenced to serve 1 year in House of Correction, ap- 
pealed 9 

Sentenced to serve 6 months in House of Correction, 

appealed 29 

Sentenced to serve 4 months in House of Correction, 

appealed 1 

Sentenced to serve 1 month in House of Correction, 

appealed 1 

Sentenced to serve 6 months in House of Correction, 

served 1 

Sentenced to serve 1 month in House of Correction, 

served 1 

Cases dismissed 4 

Not guilty 2 

Sentenced to Lyman School, (recommitted) Violation 

liquor law 1 

Of the 15 persons who were given suspended sen- 
tences, five were found later to be in the liquor busi- 
ness and were sentenced to serve six months each, in 
the House of Correction. 

Total number of persons committed to House of Cor- 
rection 7 

Number of persons who appealed cases 40 



CHIEF OF POLICE 315 

Disposition of cases in Superior Court. 

Persons sentenced to serve 3 months in House of Cor- 
rection 1 

Persons sentenced to serve 2 months in House of Cor- 
rection 2 

Persons sentenced to serve 1 month in House of Cor- 
rection 7 

Placed on file 6 

Placed on probation 1 

Not guilty 2 

Cases pending 16 

Total number of persons committed from both courts 17 



Bespectfully submitted, 

Sergeant William G. Kenney, 

in Command of Liquor Squad. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF POLICE MATRON. 

To Charles A. Kendall, Chief of Police. 

Dear Sir : — I herewith submit my report as matron 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1925. Females and minors placed 
in my charge. 

Abandonment of minor children 4 

Adultery 4 

Assault and battery 18 

Breaking glass 2 

Capais 1 

Demented 9 

Drunkenness 30 

Escaped from asylum 1 

Larceny 6 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 3 

Lost children 59 

Neglect of minor child 6 

Neglect of parent 1 

Operating motor vehicle without license 1 

Real estate, injury to 1 

Runaways 2 

Stolen property, receiving 1 

Stubbornness 3 

Threats 2 

Violation of motor vehicle laws 3 

Violation of liquor laws 36 

Violation of probation 2 

Warrant 1 



Total 196 

Respectfully sumitted, 

Mrs. Mina T. Weeks, 

Matron. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



317 



AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

Report of Police Officer, Daniel G. Simons, in charge of 
this duty, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1925. 

Number of licenses granted by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
for purchase, sale and transfer of second hand automobiles. 

First class 13 

Second class 15 

Third class 6 

Total 34 

Number of purchases, sales and transfers by dealers 4,756 

Number of individual sales and transfers 2,124 

Number of motor vehicles reported stolen by the sev- 
eral police departments, insurance agencies and 
detective bureaus in United States and Canada 11,928 

Reported recovered by same 6,753 

Number of index cards printed and filed 42,603 

Number of automobiles tagged for violation of street 

traffic ordinances 6,840 

Total number of cards printed and filed 49,443 

Cases investigated at the request of Registrar of 
Motor Vehicles, of persons who had their licenses 
to operate motor vehicles suspended or revoked 191 



Conclusion. 

I wish to tender my sincere thanks to all persons who 
have assisted me in the discharge of my duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. Kendall, 

Chief of Police. 



318 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 



Office of the City Clerk. 

January 1 7 1926. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : — 
Gentlemen : — 

The following is respectfully submitted as the fifty- 
fourth annual report of the city clerk of the City of Somer- 
ville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1925. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 

Receipts 

Balance from year 1924 being for dog li- 
censes issued in December 1924 

12 males at $2.00 $24 00 

1 female at $5.00 5 00 

1 spayed at $2.00 2 00 

31 00 
Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 

treasurer 14 at $.20 2 80 

$28 20 
For dog licenses issued in 1925: — 

795 males at $2.00 1,590 00 

201 females at $5.00 1,005 00 

95 spayed at $2.00 190 00 

2,785 00 
For hunting and fishing licenses issued 
in 1924: — 

189 fishing at $1.00 189 00 

5 alien fishing at $2.00 10 00 

1 non-resident citizens fishing at $2.00 2 00 

199 hunting and trapping at $1.50 298 50 

165 hunting and fishing at $2.00 330 00 

8' alien hunting and trapping at 

$15.00 120 00 

951 50 
Becording mortgages, assignments, etc 

1069 papers 1,594 75 

Certificates of marriage intentions, — 

1251 licenses 1,251 00 



Carried forward $2,845 75 $3,764 70 



CITY CLERK 819 

Brought forward $2,845 75 $3,764 70 

Furnishing copies of records 352 00 

Licenses : — 

Auctioneers, 32 licenses at $2.00 64 00 

Billiard and pool tables and bowling 
alleys, 183 licenses for 98 tables and 
58 alleys at $2.00 312 00 

Drain layers, 7 licenses at $1.00 7 00 

Drivers, 184 licenses at $1.00 184 00 

Engines and motors, — 

16 licenses for motors including 1 
motor granted in 1924 at $1.00 16 00 

Garages, 154 licenses including 2 li- 
censes granted in 1924 at $2.00 308 00 

Gasoline tanks, 82 licenses including 5 

licenses granted in 1924 at $1.00 .... 82 00 

Hackney carriages, 38 licenses at $1.00 38 00 

Intelligence offices, 6 licenses at $2.00 12 00 

Junk and second hand licenses, — 

30 licenses including 1 granted in 
1924 at $10 

19 licenses at $25.00 

Liquor licenses (third class) 20 at $1.00 

Lodging house licenses, 45 at $2.00 

Second hand auto licenses, 31 including 

1 granted in 1924 at $25.00 

Slaughtering, 8 at $1.00 

Street Musicians, 3 at $.50 

Victuallers licenses, 111 including 4 

granted in 1924 at $2.00 

Wagons, 60 at $1.00 

Wagon stands 21 at $1.00 

Licenses to operate motor buses 4 

at $25.00 

Motor bus licenses, 28 at $25.00 

Permits for projections over sidewalks, 

75 permits for 40 electric signs, 11 

stationary signs, 7 swing arms, 4 

marquees, 3 barber poles, 1 coal 

hole and 9 awnings, including 2 

electric signs, 2 stationary signs, 

2 swing arms, 1 awning and 1 

barber pole issued in 1924 at $1.00 

interest on deposits 

Badges 

Witness fees 

Physician registration, 11 at $.25 

Filing .Certificates, 13 at $.50 

Miscellaneous 



300 


00 


475 


00 


20 


00 


90 


00 


775 


00 


8 


00 


1 


50 


222 


00 


60 


00 


21 


00 


100 


00 


700 


00 



75 00 




8 39 




2 50 




4 95 




2 75 




6 50 




63 89 


7,157 23 




10,921 93 



320 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Payments 

To Charles E. Hatfield, county treasurer, 
June 1 and December 1, receipts for 
dog licenses from December 1, 1924 to 
November 30, 1925, both inclusive 

791 males at $2.00 

200 females at $5.00 

96 spayed at $2.00 

Less city clerk's fees 1087 at $.20 



$1,582 00 

1,000 00 

192 00 

2,774 00 

217 40 



2,556 60 



To the Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Game for licenses for hunting and fish- 
ing in 1925 — 

199 hunting and trapping at $1.50 

165 hunting and fishing at $2.00 

8 alien hunting and trapping at 

$15.00 

189 fishing at $1.00 

6 alien fishing at $2.00 

1 non-resident citizen fishing at $2.00 

Less city clerk's fees 568 at $.25 



298 


50 


330 


00 


120 


00 


, 189 


00 


12 


00 


2 


00 


$951 


50 


142 


00 



809 50 



To the city treasurer monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and record- 
cording dog licenses, 1091 at $.20 218 20 

City clerk's fees for issuing and record- 
ing fishing and hunting licenses, 568 
at $.25 142 00 

All the receipts above specified except 
for dog licenses and hunting and fish- 
ing licenses 7,157 23 



Total Payments 



Balance, January 1, 1926, being for dog 
licenses issued in December, 1925: — 

16 males at $2.00 

2 females at $5.00 



Less city Clerk's fees paid to 
the city treasurer, 18 at $.20 



$32 


00 


10 


00 


$42 


00 


3 


60 



7,517 43 
10,883 53 



38 40 



10,921 93 



CITY CLERK 321 

Licenses and Permits 

Besides the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of 
receipts, licenses and permits have been granted by the Board 
of Aldermen, without charge, as follows: — 

To hold religious services in streets and squares 4 

To parade in streets, with music, etc 7 

Children under fifteen to take part in entertainments 4 

To put banner across street 1 

To put decorations in street 1 

For public speaking in streets 1 

To hold block party in street 1 

To use land for religious purposes 1 

Newsboys 15 

To move buildings through streets 6 

Births 
1925 

Number of births reported by physicians and midwives 
for 1925 

Males 879 

Females 816 



1,695 

A canvas of the city is at present being made under the 
direction of the city clerk as required by section 5, chapter 
29, of the Revised Laws, to ascertain the facts required for 
record relative to children born during the year. 

As the information derived from such canvas will not 
be available in time sufficient for its incorporation in this 
report, a statement in full of the births of 1925 will be given 
in the city clerk's report for the year 1926. 

1924 

The following is a statement in full of the births for 
1924. 

Number of births (exclusive of still births) in Somerville 

in 1924 registered 1,977 

Males 1,037 

Females 940 

1,977 

Born of American parents 896 

Born of foreign parents 671 

Born of American father and foreign mother 182 
Born of foreign father and American mother 205 
Born of American mother and father of un- 
known nationality 15 

Born of foreign mother and father of un- 
known nationality 8 

1,977 



322 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Number of still-births in Somerville in 1924 as registered 

Number of births in other places in 1924 registered 

Number of cases of twins 



73 

812 
19 



Marriages 

1925 

Number of intention certificates issued in 1925 

(Less than previous year) 

Marriages registered 

(Less than previous year) 

Both parties American 

Both parties foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 

Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriage of 

Second marriage of 

Third marriage of 



1,253 

32 

1,281 

5 



720 
250 
143 
168 



2,266 

283 

13 



1,281 c'pls 



1,281 c'pls 



Deaths 

1925 

(Exclusive of still-births) 

Number of deaths in Somerville in 1925 

More than previous year 

Males 

Females 



Under ten years of age 

10 and under 20 years of age .. 
20 and under 30 years of age 
30 and under 40 years of age .. 
40 and under 50 years of age 
50 and under 60 years of age ... 
60 and under 70 years of age 
70 and under 80 years of age.. 
80 and under 90 years of age 
90 years of age and over 



Age of oldest person deceased 101 years 

Born in Somerville 

Born in other places in the United States .... 

Of foreign birth 

Birthplace unknown 



518 
592 



206 

28 

48 

42 

82 

131 

196 

221 

124 

32 



208 
502 
398 

2 



1,110 
131 



1,110 



1,110 



1,110 



CITY CLERK 323 



Number of deaths in January 109 

Number of deaths in February 103 

Number of deaths in March Ill 

Number of deaths in April .. 98 

Number of deaths in May 115 

Number of deaths in June 98 

Number of deaths in July 64 

Number of deaths in August 55 

Number of deaths in September 65 

Number of deaths in October 104 

Number of deaths in November „ 86 

Number of deaths in December 102 



1,110 

The number of still-births during the year was sixty- 
one. In addition to the above 288 deaths which occurred 
elsewhere were recorded in Slomerville, s almost the entire 
number of persons deceased having been residents of this 
city. 



324 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Liquor License Question. 

The following is a statement of the votes, during the sev- 
eral years of its submission to the people, on the question of 
granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors (and cer- 
tain non-intoxicating beverages) in this city, together with 
the number of registered voters and the estimated population 
for each year: — 



Year. 


Yes. 


No. 


Blank. 


Registered 


Estimated 










Voters. 


Population. 


1881 


979 


1,222 




3,678 


26,000 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3 


778 


26 


500 


1883 


767 


1,343 




4 


407 


27 


000 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4 


470 


28 


000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3 


969 


*29 


992 


1886 


214 


1,321 




4 


089 


32 


000 


1887 


555 


2,427 




4 


574 


34 


000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5 


399 


36 


000 


1889 


635 


1,706 


335 


5 


286 


39 


000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5 


556 


*40 


117 


1891 


1,054 


2,598 


279 


5 


938 


43 


000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 


347 


7 


587 


46 


000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7 


943 


48 


000 


1894 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8 


007 


50 


000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8 


410 


*52 


200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9 


379 


54 


000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


486 


8 


925 


56 


000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8 


657 


57 


500 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8 


838 


60 


000 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9 


620 


*61 


643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9 


499 


63 


500 


1902 


1,645 


3,242 


360 


10 


,100 


65 


000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11 


346 


67 


000 


1904 


2,022 


4,338 


447 


11 


682 


69 


500 


1905 


2,483 


4,660 


531 


11 


340 


*69 


272 


1906 


2,193 


5,204 


582 


11 


571 


70 


000 


1907 


1,735 


4,591 


459 


11 


558 


74 


000 


1908 


1,780 


4,760 


491 


12 


777 


75 


500 


1909 


1,830 


4,601 


530 


12 


479 


75 


500 


1910 


1,544 


3,968 


365 


12 


522 


*77 


236 


1911 


2,193 


4,841 


492 


13 


226 


80 


000 


1912 


2,421 


6,182 


546 


13 


854 


81 


000 


1913 


2,348 


6,431 


550 


13 


417 


82 


000 


1914 


2,178 


5,535 


488 


13 


404 


85 


000 


1915 


1,705 


5,262 


379 


13 


805 


*86 


854 


1916 


1,100 


4,158 


271 


14 


500 


88 


000 


1917 


1,291 


3,457 


232 


13 


826 


90 


000 


1918 


690 


1,935 


161 


13 


477 


" 90 


500 


1919 


2,777 


2,297 


261 


14 


810 


91 


000 


1920 








27 


307 


*93 


091 


1921 


5,143 


8,751 


2,992 


27 


545 


95 


000 


1922 












96 


000 


1923 


7,266 


9,822 


4,382 


28 


149 


97 


000 


1924 












98 


000 


1925 








34 


434 


*99 


032 



♦Census. 



CITY CLERK 325 

ORDINANCES 

Somerville, January 1, 1926. 

The following ordinances have been adopted since the 
printing of the annual reports for the year 1924: — 



ORDINANCE NO. 110 

An Ordinance Amending Ordinance No. 109 entitled "An Ord- 
inance Establishing Fire Districts." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the city of Somer- 
ville as follows: — 

Section 1. Ordinance No. 109 entitled "An Ordinance Establish- 
ing Fire Districts" is hereby amended by adding the following to 
section 1. 



Fire District No. 10 — Powder House Square 

Beginning at the junction of the easterly side of Pearson road 
and the northeasterly side of Broadway, thence the boundary line 
runs northeasterly at right angles to Broadway to the boundary line 
between the city of Medford and the city of Somerville; thence north- 
westerly on said boundary line to a point one hundred feet north- 
easterly from Broadway; thence northwesterly in a line parallel 
with Broadway and distant one hundred feet therefrom to College 
avenue; thence southerly on College avenue to Broadway; thence 
southeasterly on Broadway to the point of beginning. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved April 11, 1925. 



ORDINANCE NO. 111 

An Ordinance to Prevent the Attachment of Notices etc. to poles 
and other structures in public places. 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somer- 
ville) as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall attach or cause to be attached a 
sign, placard, notice or any other thing to a tree, pole, post or other 
structure in a public park, public way or public boulevard. 

Section 2. Any person who violates any of the provisions of 
this ordinance shall be liable to a penalty of not more than twenty 
dollars for each offense. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 15, 1925. 



326 ANNUAL REPORTS 

ORDINANCE NO. 112 

An ordinance establishing Spring Hill terrace as a oneway street. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the city of Somer- 
ville, as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall cause or allow a vehicle other than 
a vehicle propelled by hand to pass along any portion of Spring 
Hill terrace, except in a southeasterly or northeasterly direction be- 
tween Belmont street and Highland avenue. 

Section 2. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance 
shall be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each 
offence. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect August 1, 1925. 

Approved July 28, 1925. 

ORDINANCE NO. 113 

An Ordinance Relative to Vehicles in Marshall Street 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somer- 
ville, as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall cause or allow any vehicle to remain 
standing more than ten minutes on the southeasterly half of Marshall 
street within two hundred and thirty feet of the southwesterly side 
of Broadway. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

Section 3. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance 
shall be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each 
offense. 

Approved September 25, 1925. 

ORDINANCE NO. 114 
Building Zone Ordinance 

Printed as a separate document. 



CITY CLERK 



327 



ELECTIONS 

The following is a statement of the votes cast in the 
several wards of the city for the candidates for the various 
offices, at the City Election held therein, November 3, 1925. 



Candidate. 



Party. 



MAYOR 

Leon M. Conwell 
John J. Murphy 
Wm. J. Bell 



Republican 
Democratic 



ALDERMAN- AT-LARGE 
WARD ONE 



Elmer B. Hayes 
William J. Keeley 



Republican 
Democratic 



WARD TWO 



Peter F. Donnelly 
Edwin J. Grant 
Robert C. Harris 



Democratic 

Non-Partisan 

Republican 



WARD THREE 



Charles E. Gerrish 
Henry F. Rafferty 



Republican 
Democratic 



WARD FOUR 



Warren A. Perry 
Waldo D. Phelps 



Republican 
Democratic 



WARD FIVE 



Charles Chamberlain 

Grimmons 
William E. O'Brien 



Republican 
Democratic 



WARD SIX 

Anothony J. Bianchi Democratic 
Warren C. Blair Republican 



WARD SEVEN 



Paul O. Curtis 
George W. O'Brien 



Republican 
Democratic 



Wards. 



1261 
1570 



1341 
1378 



1284 

100 

1091 



1122 
1302 



1077 
1330 



1100 

1298 



1250 
1106 



1096 
1276 



347 
2437 



3 


4 


5 


1694 
1647 


1447 
1053 


2142 

1987 
2 









315 

2013 


1497 
1423 


1304 
892 


1968 
1785 


1771 
169 
678 


1277 

205 

1336 


859 

163 

1079 


1690 

207 

1741 


275 

2046 


1637 
1549 


1247 

864 


1873 
1752 


285 
1950 


1451 
1376 


1339 
986 


1875 
1740 


287 
1969 


1486 
1362 


1231 
873 


2096 
1797 


1906 
321 


1375 
1470 


870 
1208 


1695 

1881 


274 
1973 


1456 
1369 


1216 
863 


1856 
1739 



6 


7 


2390 


4632 


2293 


1886 


2118 


4216 


2006 


1632 


1805 


1528 


278 


801 


1947 


3922 


2062 
1977 


4093 
1596 


2030 
1940 


4079 
1614 


2076 
1934 


4086 
1615 


2128 
2292 


1630 
4034 


2067 


4446 


1924 


1777 



13913 

12873 

2 



12759 
11129 



10214 

1423 

11794 



12309 
11086 



12136 
10936 



12362 
10848 



10854 
12312 



12411 
10921 



328 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Candidate. 



Party 



Wards. 



WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD ONE 
Wiliiam F. Burns Democratic 

Daniel A. Downey Democratic 

Harold G. Knapp Republican 

William E. MacAlpine Republican 



WARD ALDERMAN 

WARD TWO 

Louis S. Domings Republican 

Joseph A. Haley Democratic 

Robert W. Houley Democratic 



WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD THREE 
Earnest C. Carr Democratic 

William S. Howe Republican 

Thomas F. Ma l cKey Democratic 

Waldron B. Seller Republican 

WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD FOUR 
Thomas F. Bullock Democratic 
Joseph S. Calese Democratic 

Henry J. Connell Republican 

Edith B. Davidson Republican 

WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD FIVE 
Arthur P. Dionne Democratic 

Arthur G. Pearson Republican 

David Y. Ross Republican 

Patrick H. Ryan Democratic 

Frank A. Howard 



WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD SIX 
Uee C. Kitson Republican 

Elwood L. Mason Republican 

Paul A. McCarthy Democratic 

Daniel F. Murphy Democratic 



WARD ALDERMAN 
WARD SEVEN 
"William L. Bigley Democratic 

Harrison W. Bowers Republican 
Warren L. Dalton Republican 

John P. Whalen Democratic 



MEMBERS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
WARD ONE 
Francis J. Fitzpatrick Democratic 
John Calder Gordon Independent 
John J. Hayes Democratic 

Hattie B. Morrill Independent 



1,505 
1,426 
1.163 
1,106 



341 
2,221 
2,171 



1,616 
1,592 
1,573 
1,542 



865 

911 

1,389 

1,353 



1 ,612 

796 

1,520 

862 



1,847 
2,064 
1,980 
1,748 
1 



2.324 
2,345 
1,969 
2,001 



Total. 



1,505 
1.426 
1,163 
1.106 



341 
2.221 
2,171 



1.616 

1 ,592 
1.573 
1,542 



865 

911 

1,389 

1,353 



1,847 
2,064 
1,980 
1-.748 
1 



2,324 
2.345 
1.969 
2,001 



1,694 
4.358 
4,471 
1,626 



1,694 
4.358 
4.471 
1,626 



1.612 
796 

1,520 
862 



CITY CLERK 



329 



Candidate. 



Party. 



MEMBERS OF 

SCHOOL, COMMITTEE 

WARD TWO 

William F. Dewire Democratic 

Christopher Muldoon, Jr. 

Democratic 



MEMBERS OF 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

WARD THREE 

Richard W. Bennett Republican 

John Christopher Kelleher 

Democratic 
Clifford T. Richardson Republican 
James C. Scanlan Democratic 



MEMBERS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
WARD FOUR 
Anna G. Madden Democratic 

Alice P. Russell Republican 

Mary V. Sullivan Democratic 

Walter E. Whitaker Republican 

MEMBERS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
WARD FIVE 
Arthur F. McCarthy Democratic 
John J. Nagle Democratic 

Harry M. Stoodley Republican 

Minnie S. Turner Republican 

MEMBERS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
WARD S»IX 
Elizabeth J. Carnes Democratic 
Walter I. Chapman Republican 

Arthur B. Gradone Democratic 

John B. Maitland 

Citizens Candidate 
John G. Niles Republican 



MEMBERS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
WARD SEVEN 
Frank L. Alciere Democratic 

Herbert Cholerton Republican 

Katherine M. Fitzgerald 
_, Democratic 

Edwin A. Shaw Republican 



Wards. 



Total. 



2220 
2196 



1608 

1531 

1570 
1586 



879 
1340 

902 
1446 



1864 
1760 
2064 
2020 



1972 
2216 

1825 

1113 
1524 



1574 
4435 

1710 
4365 



2220 
2196 



1608 

1531 
1570 
1586 



879 
1340 

902 
1446 



1864 
1760 
2064 
2020 



1972 
2216 
1825 

1113 

1524 



1574 
4435 

1710 
4365 



330 



ANNUAL RETORTS 



ASSESSED POLLS AND REGISTERED VOTERS. 



Ward 



Ward 1 
1 
1 

1 



Ward 2 
2 
2 



Ward 3 
3 



Ward 4 
4 



Ward 5 
5 
5 



Ward 6 
6 

" « 6 
6 



Ward 7 

7 

7 
7 
7 



City 



Pct. 



Pet. 



Pct. 



Tct. 



Pct. 



Pct. 



Pct. 



Pct. 



As- 
sessed 
Polls, 
April 

1, 
1925 








Registered Voters. 








Vot- 
ers 
Nov. 

4, 
1924 
Men 


Voters 

Nov. 

4, 

1924 

Women 


Re- 
vised 
Lists 

of 
July 

1925 
Men 


Re- 
vised 
Lists 

of 
July 

1925 
Women 


Add- 
ed in 

1925 
Men 


Add- 
ed in 

1925 
Women 


Nov. 
3. 

1925 
Men 


Nov. 

3. 

1925 

Women 


Voted. 
Nov. 
1925 


1,686 

1,152 

572 

681 

4,091 

1.137 

2.110 

876 


916 
669 
342 
253 


718 
489 
261 
167 


786 
556 
277 
218 


616 
426 
235 

147 


96 73 
49 1 39 

3> 25 
29 20 


882 
605 
30.^ 

247 


689 
465 
260 
167 


1203- 
803- 
470 
372' 


2,180 

410 

1,124 

447 


1,635 

273 
918 
333 


1,837 

342 
990 
392 


1 .424 

224 
813 
306 


206 157 

36 22 

131 123 

50 44 


2,043 

378 

1,121 

442 


1.581 

246 

936 
350 


2.848 

515 

1,652 

643- 


4,123 

1,542 
1,451 


1,981 

1,040 
918 


1,524 

1,000 
916 


1,724 

93 i 

844 


1,343 

924 

821 


217 

92 
111 


189 

82 
101 


1,941 

1,023 
955 


1,532 

1,006 
922 


2,810- 

1,720- 
1,637 


2,993 

1,589 
1,535 


1,958 

972 

863 


1,916 

874 
786 


1,775 

858 
762 


1,745 

774 
683 


203 

66 
91 


183 

60 

61 


1.978 

924 
853 


1,928 

834 
744 


3,357 

1,315- 
1,195- 


3,124 

1,739 

1,280 
1,079 


1,835 

1,136 
821 
752 


1,660 

1,112 
764 

718 


1,620 

1 .039 
742 
641 


1,457 

1,066 
696 
622 


157 

8o 
78 
64 


121 

100 
58 
61 


1.777 

1,125 

820 
705 


1.578 

1,166 
754 
683 


2,510- 

1,766 
1 ,244 
1,133; 


4,098 

1,364 
1,568 
1,047 
1.467 


2,709 

785 

783 

717 

1,016 


2,594 

702 
549 
644 
902 


2,422 

731 
707 
610 
931 


2,384 

669 
495 
554 

820 


228 

70 

78 
44 
68 


219 

76 
43 
37 
56 


2.650 

801 
785 
654 
999 


2.603 

745 

538 
591 
876 


4,143. 

1,299 

1.024 

961 

1,432- 


5,446 

1,209 
1,454 
1,820 
1,191 
1,429 


3,301 

908 
941 
1,192 
866 
960 


2,797 

838 
862 
1.016 
764 
866 


2,979 

852 
747 
1,067 
780 
865 


2,538 

808 
806 
941 
694 
770 


260 

47 

108 

52 

56 

51 


212 

42 

-23 

50 

53 

68 


3,239 

899 
855 
1,119 
836 
916 


2,750 

850 

783 
991 
747 
838 


4,716 

1,315 
1.242" 
1,524 
1.287 
1.190 


7,103 


4.867 


4,346 


4,311 


4,019 


314 


190 


4,625 


4,209 


6.558 


30,978 


18.831 


16.472 


16,668 


14,910 


1,585 


1,271 


18.253 


16.181 


26,942 



CITY CLERK 



331 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1925 



Mayor 

John M. Webster, 76 Boston Street 

Board of Aldermen 

President, John S. Smith, Jr. 
Vice-President, Arthur F. Mason 



ward ONE 

Lyman A. Hodgdon, Alderman-at-large (resigned Jan. 5, 1925) 

8 Indiana Avenue 
Cecil Taylor, Alderman-at-large (elected Jan. 5, 1925) 

27 Michigan Avenue 

William F. Burns 21 Illinois Avenue 

Daniel A. Downey 155 Glen Street 

WARD TWO 

Edwin J. Grant, Alderman-at-large ...... 21 Webster Avenue 

Joseph A. Haley 7 Linden Street 

John J. Hoban 39 Mansfield Street 

WARD THREE 

Thomas D. Mitchell, Alderman-at-large . . .25 Warren Avenue 

George A. Berry 60 Prescott Street 

Charles E. Gerrish 70 Boston Street 

WARD FOUR 

John S. Smith, Jr., Alderman-at-large . . 20 Richdale Avenue 

Henry J. Connell 150 Pearl Street 

Warren A. Perry 11 Evergreen Avenue 

WARD FIVE 

Arthur W. Russell, Alderman-at-large ... 41 Sewall Street 

Warren C. Blair 155 Summer Street 

Charles C. Grimmons . . ... 72 Thurston Street 

WARD six 

Albert E. Hughes, Alderman-at-large . . .20 Aberdeen Road 
William M. Morrison . . . . . .97 Rogers Avenue 

I. Ormand Jackson 7 Lexington Avenue 

WARD SEVEN 

Arthur F. Mason, Alderman-at-large ... 18 Hall Avenue 

Paul O. Curtis 36 College Avenue 

Albert F. McLean (resigned October 22, 1925) 98 Electric Avenue 

William E. Union (elected October 22, 1925) 54 Meacham Road 



332 ANNUAL REPORTS 

City Clerk, Jason M. Carson 

Assistant City Clerk, Henry J. Allen 

City Messenger, Fred E. Hanlet 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Thursday evenings 
of each month, at eight o'clock, except when such Thursday 
is a holiday, in which case the meeting is held on the preced- 
ing Tuesday evening. 

Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 

Electric Lines and Lights — Aldermen Mason, Haley, Jackson, Grim- 
mons and Gerrish. 

Finance — The President, Aldermen Mitchell, Curtis, Haley, Hughes, 
Russell and Taylor. 

Legislative Matters — Aldermen Hughes, Perry, Hoban, Berry and 
Taylor. 

Licenses and Permits — Aldermen Connell, Grimmons, Morrison, 

Mason, Grant, Downey and Gerrish. 
Public Property — Aldermen Union, Morrison, Downey, Blair and 

Grant. 

Public Safety — Aldermen Russell, Connell, Curtis, Burns, and Mit- 
chell. 

Public Works — Aldermen Blair, Berry, Burns, Perry, Union, Jack- 
son and Hoban. 



School Committee 

Chairman, Harry M. Stoodley 
Vice-Chairman, John J. Hayes 



Hon. John M. Webster Mayor, ex-omcio 76 Boston Street 

John S. Smith, Jr., President of the Board of Aldermen, ex-officio 

20 Richdale Avenue 



ward one 

Francis J. Fitzpatrick 2 Austin Street 

John J. Hayes 10 Wisconsin Avenue 



ward two 

Daniel H. Bradley 19 Concord Avenue 

Christopher J. Muldoon 88 Concord Avenue 



ward three 

Charles W. Boyer 66 Avon Street 

Oscar W. Codding 59 Vinal Avenue 



CITY CLERK 



333 



Katherine C. Coveney 
Walter E. Whittaker 



WARD FOUR 



73 Marshall Street 
135 Walnut Street 



Harry M. Stoodley 
Minnie S. Turner 



WARD FIVE 



238 Highland Avenue 
. 64 Hudson Sereet 



ward six 



Walter I. Chapman . . . . . .18a Central Street 

Walter Frye Turner 15 Highland Road 



WARD SEVEN 



Herbert Cholerton 
Edwin A. Shaw 



94 College Avenue 
63 College Avenue 



Superintendent and Secretary, Charles S. Clark 

Regular meetings last Monday evening of each month, 
except July and August, when none are held. 



Assessors 



Fred E. Warren, Chairman (term expires 1926) 

Winsor L. Snow (term expires 1927) resigned Jan. 8, 1925. 

Harry Van Iderstine (term expires 1926) 

J. Robert Fenelon (term expires 1928) 

David B. Armstrong (term expires 1927) 

Horace A. Lewis (term expires 1927) appointed Jan. 22, 1925. 



Assistant Assessors 



Fred B. Clapp 
Harry L. Haselstine 
Earle W. Edwards 



John J. McCarthy 
John M. Nangle 
Leonard C. Spinney 



Board of Health 

James A. Kiley (term expires 1926) 

Lizette L. Vorce (term expires 1926) 

Cheslie A. C. Richardson, M. D. Chairman (term expires 1927) 



Clerk, Laurence S. Howard 

Agent, George I. Canfield 

Medical Inspector, Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Charles M. Berr\y 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, Herbert E. Bowman 



331 \NNUAL REPORTS 



Licensing Commission 

William J. Shanahan (term expires 1928) 
Eugene M. Carman (term expires 1926) 
William H. Smith (term expires 1927) 



Department of Public Welfare 

Fred E. Durgin, Chairman (term expires 1926) 

James D. Sharkey (term expires 1927) 

George G. Brayley (term expires 1928) 

Agent, William E. Copithorne 

IVarden, City Home, J. Foster Colquhoun 

Matron, City Home, Catherine Colquhoun 

Planning Board 

Willam F. Riley. Chairman (term expires 1926) 
David J. Kelley, Secretary (term expires 1929) 
John Williamson (term expires 1927) 
George J. Rauh, (term expires 1928) 
Waldo D. Phelps (term expires 1930) 

Registrars of Voters 

Edwin D. Sibley. Chairman (term expires 1927) 
Douglass B. Foster (term expires 1926) 
Charles Leo Shea (term expires 1928) 
Jason M. Carson, City Clerk 

Assistant Registrars of Voters 

John L. Ahearn (term expires 1926) 
Henry J. Allen (term expires 1926) 
John H. Kelley (term expires 1926) 
James W. Kenney (term expires 1926) 

Public Library Trustees 

Thomas M. Durell, Chairman (term expires 1928) 
J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1926) 
William L. Barber (term expires 1928) 
Herbert L. Buffum (term expires 1926) 
Giles W. Bryant (term expires 1927) 

died Nov. 8, 1925 
Frank M. Barnard (term expires 1926) 
Leon M. Conwell (term expires 1927) 

(resigned Dec. 22, 1925) 
George E. Whitaker (term expires 1927) 
Arthur L. Haskell (term expires 1928) 
William H. Dolben (term expires 1927) 

appointed to fill vacancy Nov. 24, 1925 
William J. Ennis (term expires 1927) 

appointed to fill vacancy Dec. 22, 1925 



CITY CLERK 335 



Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 

Ernest W. Bailey (term expires 1927) 
Sophie C. Bateman (term expires 1927) 
Charles S. Clark (term expires 1926) 
William E. Copithorne (term expires 1927) 
Florence B. Hamilton (term expires 1926) 
William S. Howe (term expires 1926) 
Mary M. McGann, (term expires 1926) 
Annie M. Smith (term expires 1926) 

(resigned Feb. 26, 1925) 
Winnifred P. Davis (term expires 1927) 
George H. Evans (term expires 1927) 
Adelaide L. Newton (term expires 1926) 

City Clerk 

Jason M. Carson 
Assistant City Clerk, Henry J. Allen 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 

Joseph S. Pike 

City Messenger 
Fred E. Hanley 

Mayor's Secretary 
Sumner M. Teele 

City Solicitor 
Frank W. Kaan 

City Auditor 

Howard E. Wem'yss 

City Engineer 
Ernest W. Bailey 

Commissioner of Streets 
Asa B. Prichard 

Commissioner of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings 

George L. Dudley 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights 
Walter I. Fuller 

Water Commissioner 
Frank E. Merrill 

Superintendent of Sanitary Department 
Edgar T. Mayhew 

Clerk of Committees 
Richard A. Keyes 



S36 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Chief of Police 
Charles A. Kendall 

Chief Engineer of the Fire Department 

Sewall M. Rich 

City Physician 
Frank E. Bateman 

Inspector of Plumbing 
Duncan C. Greene 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
Herbert E. Bowman 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 

Charles M. Berry 

Inspector of Petroleum 

Sewall M. Rich 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Benjamin S. Abbott 

Fence Viewers 

Charles M. Berry 
Howard Lowell 

Agent of Military and State Aid and Soldiers' Relief and Burial Agent 

Benjamin S. Abbott 

Constables 

Charles M. Austin Albion B. Crocker Ernest Howard 

Charles W. F. BennettThomas L. Cronin Frank B. Karcher 

John J. Bergin Thomas Damery Charles A. Kendall 

Salvatore Bianchino Wm. J. DiGuiseppe Michael T. Kennedy 

(Appointment revok- Charles L. Ellis Murray C. Kerwin 

ed Mar. 12, 1925) Herbert Jos. Emerson Elbridge G. Lavender 

Eugene A. Carter Arthur L. Gilman John M. Nangle 

William E. CopithorneFred E. Hanley John A. Ray 

Winslow W. Coffin James M. Harmon John F. Scannell 



CITY ENGINEER 337 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER 



Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall, Somerville, January 20, 1926. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the city ordinances, the 
following report of the work done and expense incurred for 
the year ending December 31, 1925, by the Engineering De- 
partment and appropriations under my charge and supervi- 
sion, including the accounts of city engineer, sewers construc- 
tion, sewers maintenance, parks maintenance, playgrounds 
maintenance, and other public works, is herewith presented : — 
the 53rd annual report — my thirtieth report as city engineer. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

In previous reports the general work, charter require- 
ments and city ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
engineer have been fully described — he shall be consulted in 
relation to public improvements of every kind when the ad- 
vice of a civil engineer would be of service. City Engineer 
is also Supt. of Sewers and Supt. of Parks and grounds. 



Divisions Appropriations and Transfers Expenditures Balances 

City Engineer $13,600 00 $919 26 $14,516 57 $ 2 69 

Parks Maintenance .... 15,000 00 373 38 

Playgrounds Maint 7,650 00 

Pk. and Playgrd. Imp. 6,294 09 10 00 

Sewers Maintenance .. 25,000 00 

Sewers Construction .. 98,446 90 91 17 

*$700 00 transferred to Construction New Field House — Somer- 

erville Field. 
*$800 00 transferred to City Engineer Account. 

(Expenditures in the various divisions are shown in de- 
tail in the city auditor's annual report.) 



15,303 62 


69 75 


♦7,649 24 


76 


*5,876 39 


427 70 


24,982 12 


17 88 


89,219 59 


9,318 48 



338 ANNUAL REPORTS 

CITY ENGINEER DIVISION, CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDI- 
TURES, 1925 

Sewers and Storm Drains, — comprising surveys, estimates, 
profiles, lines, grades, titles, plans, assessments, all 
engineering work relating to same and supervision.... $2,352 70 

Highways, — comprising plans, estimates, titles, profiles, 
lines and grades, inspection of paving and all other 
engineering work relating to the department 2,277 88 

Sidewalks, — comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, inspection, titles, costs and assessments 199 84 

Water Works, — comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants, services for buildings, and 
other matters relating to the department 212 51 

Parks and Playgrounds, — comprising surveys, plans, esti- 
mates, profiles, and grades, including laying out of 
parks, playgrounds, boulevard and supervision 238 78 

Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to construction 
and laying out of grounds 125 25 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings, 

plans, assigning street numbers, etc 480 65 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties 
for building and grading 178 79 

Bridges and Grade Crossings, — comprising surveys, plans, 

profiles, estimates, lines and grades, etc 10 00 

1Uity Survey, — comprising establishing of street lines, 
acceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 
city map, etc 271 24 

Middlesex Registry and Land Court, — comprising copying 
of plans, and abstracts from deeds and examination 
of titles filed at East Cambridge, also tracing of street 
acceptance and sewer taking plans, filed for record 138 42 

'Private Corporations, Railway, Telephone, Electric Light 
and Gas Light Companies, — comprising grades, plans, 
profiles and office notes, locations of poles and conduits 159 92 

Setting Stone Bounds and Brass Rods, — defining street 

lines and city boundary lines 

Office Work, — comprising record of all locations, indexing, 
typewriting, bookkeeping, calculations, reports, and 
general draughting 1,370 04 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising designs, sketches, etc., 

relating to various schemes for committees 

Holidays, Vacations and Sickness 692 82 

National Guard Duty 70 00 

Engineering, — General Departmental expenses (all divi- 
sions) comprising city engineer's salary, auto, tele- 
phone, carfares, and supplies 5,737 73 

Total $14,516 57 

Value of field instruments, tools and office instruments, 
91,509,00. 



CITY ENGINEER 339 

The total cost of maintaining the Engineer's Division 
since it was established, 1872-1925, both years inclusive, has 
amounted to $479,061.57. 

Five assistants have been employed the greater part of 
the year, on engineering work. 

A number of plans were made during the year for street 
acceptance and five streets have been accepted as public high- 
ways under the betterment act. 

There are plans for acceptance of ten private streets 
on file in this office, that for various reasons have not been 
made public ways. 

Middlesex Avenue and a section of Mystic Avenue (be- 
tween Middlesex Avenue and Austin Street) have been trans 
ferred or turned over from State control to the ctiy as pub- 
lic highways — and the city has widened Middlesex Avenue 
on the easterly side 20 feet, the total width being 80 feet; 
Mystic Avenue is 6G feet wide. The paved roadways, when 
fully completed, will be 60 feet and 52 feet in width. 

Surveys, calculations, estimates and plans have been 
made for taking land, buildings and private property for 
various purposes in certain sections of the city. 

Some of the old main thoroughfares should be renum- 
bered their entire length, so as to eliminate half numbers and 
letters now being used, also certain streets, continuing in bor- 
dering cities where numbers conflict. 

Perambulation of the Somerville — Cambridge city bound- 
ary line. A committee appointed from each city, including 
the city engineers and street commissioners, — examined the 
monuments and reference points defining the division line be- 
tween these two cities. The granite bound No. 7 on Line 
Street is to be reset. 

These boundary lines are perambulated every five years 
as prescribed by the statutes. 



340 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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CITY ENGINEER 341 

LENGTH OF STREETS 

♦Public : 87.437 

Private 14.470 

Total length of streets 101.907 

♦Includes 1.406 Miles City Boulevard and Park Roadways 
2.331 Miles State Boulevard 
0.97 Miles State Highway 

In the 1910 report, tables were published showing old 
names of certain streets as formerly known, and names of 
public Squares in the city; the names of some of these Squares 
have been changed recently, and new Squares added. 

LENGTH OF PUBLIC STREETS IN EACH WARD 

Miles 

Ward one 10.824 

Ward two , 9.952 

Ward three 7.630 

Ward four 10.026 

Ward five 12,658 

Ward six 13.966 

Ward sven 22.381 



Ttotal length of public street in the city 87.437 

Street "Markers" — (Stone Bounds) (Brass rods set in 
cement sidewalks.) 

There are at the present time a total of 662 bounds or 
brass rods set for defining street lines, and this work should 
be continued as much as possible each year. These bounds 
are also of great convenience in establishing permanent 
"Bench Marks" throughout the city for giving grades. 

Previous reports will show location of all street bounds 
set. 

(9) STREETS CONSTRUCTED UNDER BETTERMENT ACT 

Type of constructions Granite Edgestone, Concrete Gut- 
ters and Bituminous Macadam Roadway. 

Width of roadway Length In feet 

Cady Avenue 

Corinthian Road 

East Albion Street 

Fairfax Street 

Fremont Street 

Lewis Street 

Sunset Road 

Watson Street 

Woods Avenue 

Total 



26.7 


158.1 


26.7 


560.3 


23.3 


284.9 


26.7 


933.0 


26.7 


182.8 


26.7 


416.0 


26.7 


656.2 


2S.7 


236.5 


26.7 


1,148.7 


(0.867 Mile) 


4,576.5 



342 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Average cost $11.86 per linear foot. 

Assessments have been levied on abutting property own- 
ers for approximately one-half of the cost of constructing 
these streets. 

STREETS GRANITE PAVED 

New blocks and old blocks (re-cut) have been laid on 
a concrete base with Portland cement grout in 

Square Yards Length 

Middlesex Avenue (west side) (except 24' 

width old concrete rodaway) 

Middlesex Avenue (east side) 9,657.0 2,306.0 

Prospect Street (between R. R. bridge and 

Webster Avenue 560.0 152.9 

Webster Avenue (between Columbia Street and 

city line) (St. Ry. location) 335.0 610.0 

Medford Street (between Broadway and Nor- 
wood Ave.) 2,857.0 690.0 

Somerville Avenue (southwest side) (between 

Wilson Square and opposite Central St.) 
Somerville Avenue (northeast side) (between 

Granite Street and Elm Street) 10,862.1 2,424.1 

Mystic Avenue (between Austin Street and 

Boston line) old blocks and concrete base 

relaid 3,750.0 1,054.0 



Total (1.35 Miles) 28,021.1 7,237.0 

STREETS SURFACED WITH WAR/RENITE (Warren Bros. Patent) 
Laid on top old concrete base. 

Square Yards Length 

Broadway (northeast side) (between Magoun 

Square and Alfred Street) 1,838.0 758.6 

Medford Street (between Norwood Avenue 

and including Gilman Square) 12,381.0 3,191.6 

Pearl Street (between Gilman Square and 

Cross Street) 9,779.0 2,574.0 



Total (1.23 Miles) 23,998.0 6,524.2 

The total length of permanent paved streets in the city 
amounts to 18.768 miles. 

Permanent street pavement should be extended as rapid- 
ly as possible, using old granite blocks, re-cut and laid on a 
concrete base — the best and most economical pavement for 
this city. 



CITY ENGINEER 34S 

Grades were given and measurements taken for the re- 
construction of five streets with a bituminous wearing surface, 
a length of 4,670 feet. 

In constructing the granite pavement, new bituminous 
streets and granolithic sidewalks, 14, 283.0 feet (2.70 miles) 
of new edgestone were set. 

TABLE OF STREET CONSTRUCTION 

Square Yards Miles 

♦Streets paved with granite blocks 164,917 7.833 

♦♦Streets paved with concrete 11,772 .46 

tStreets paved with asphaltic top 29,666 1.71 

Streets paved with vitrified brick 20,958 1.29 

Streets paved with "Bi-co-mac" 2,581 0.22 

Streets paved with bitulithic (patent) 37,405 2.03 

Combination pavement (concrete base with 

bituminous top) 81,065 5.44 

{Streets macadamized (bituminous binder).. 47.012 

Streets macadamized (water bound) 20.37 

Streets graveled or unimproved 15.75 

Total 101.91 

♦Also 31.41 miles (single tract) electric railway paved with gran- 
ite, asphalt, bitulithic, etc. 
♦♦Includes 6,149 sq. yds. concrete roadway Middlesex Avenue. 

flncludes 0.97 mile of state highway. 

{Includes 1.406 miles of city boulevard and park roadways and 
2.331 miles of state boulevard (Metropolitan District Com- 
sission, Park Division.) 

There are a number of crossings in this city at inter- 
secting public thoroughfares, where the corners should be 
cut back and the roadway widened for the safety of traffic 
and improvement in appearance. 

Lines and grades were given and measurements taken 
for constructing thrity-seven new granolithic sidewalks — 
4,783 square yards (1.027 miles) and assessments were 
computed, the abutting property owners paying one-half the 
cost on twenty-six sidewalks, the remainder the entire cost. 
City work was done at an average cost of$3.40 per square 
yard. 

In laying out new work, under orders passed for con- 
struction of sidewalks, etc., occasionally portions of build- 
ings and fences are found to be encroaching on the sidewalk 
and on some of the old rangeways these encroachments have 
existed for many years; as improvements are made, the full 
width of sidewalk should be maintained. 



344 



ANNUAL REE'ORTS 



In sections of the city where brick sidewalks have been 
laid many years, and must necessarily be relaid on account 
of deterioration and unevenness, — cement sidewalks should be 
substituted in place of brick. 



MILES OF EDGESTONE, GRANOLITHIC, GRAVEL AND BRICK 
SIDEWALKS IN EACH WARD 



Gravel 



Brick Granolithic 



Edgestone Sidewalk Sidewalk Sidewalk 



Ward one 


20.174 


3.441 
6.034 
0.906 
0.993 
4.270 
3.579 
0.556 


11.843 
6.340 

11.527 
9.548 

12.103 

10.475 
8.220 


5.184 


Ward two 


17.564 


4.304 


Ward three 

Ward four 


14.325 
16.186 


1.968 
4:700 


Ward five 

Ward six 


22.921 
25.432 


6.237 
11.992 


Ward seven 


36.655 


24.64 









153.257 



19.779 



70.056 



59.025 



(Details, etc., streets and sidewalks in report of Street 
Commissioner.) 

Plans have been made by the various companies and 
filed in the city engineer's office, showing the locations of 
gas mains, poles, tracks and conduits in this city, which 
have been granted by the board of aldermen during the year ; — 
the work of placing overhead wires in conduits, underground, 
and removing poles from the streets should be extended as 
rapidly as possible. 

In the City's squares overhead wires should be placed 
underground, immediately, and practically all poles (except 
for lights) removed — on the main thoroughfares many of the 
existing poles should be eliminated, at the present time, 
being unnecessary. 

A special ordinance should be enacted concerning city 
inspection on all underground work done by private com 
panies or corporations and regulation as to method of street 
openings. 



UNDERGROUND CONDUITS 

Miles laid in 
City Streets 

Boston Elevated Electric R. R 4.46 

Edison Electric Light Co 15.42 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. 19.52 
City Fire Alarm Wires (located in ducts 

constructed by Corporations) 12.95 

Cambrige Gas Co. (pipe line) 65.96 

Charlestown Gas Co. (pipe line) 31.15 

Total 149.46 



CITY ENGINEER 345 

All locations for sub-surface construction art assigned 
by this department. 

Lines and grades have been given for laying new city 
water mains. New house services, many gates, hydrants, 
water posts and blow-offs have been located and recorded, 
sketches and plans made showing the same, and the water 
works maps corrected to date; also a large number of old 
water services where new meters were installed, have been 
located and recorded. 

A number of the locations of old hydrants, gates, etc., 
have been found to be incorrect, a few having been removed 
entirely; a new survey of the entire distribution system 
should be made and the maps and office records compiled. 
(Length of water mains, details, etc., in report of water com- 
missioner. ) 

All plans of estates in Somerville recorded at the Regis- 
try of Deeds, East Cambridge, including land court, plans, 
have been copied, also titles examined, abstracts from deeds 
made for the purpose of assessments, and the proportional 
part of the cost of new work computed, and schedules of 
assessments made out showing the property owners. 

A set of block plans should be made covering the en- 
tire city area, from accurate surveys made during the past 
thirty-five years, and carefully compared section by section 
with the deed dimensions and areas recorded in the assessors' 
department, and in this manner the correct areas of land de- 
termined. 

This set of plans would show the area and dimensions 
of each lot, all houses and other buildings, sewers, catch 
basins, house drains, water services, gas mains, underground 
conduits for wires, street lights, street railway tracks, etc., 
and be of great value to many city departments. Five of 
these sectional plans have been partially made. A seperate 
appropriation should be made for completing these plans. 

Total number of plans on file in the office approximate- 
ly eight thousand, eight hundred and fifty. 

For the immediate improvement of conditions in this 
city the highway bridges and approaches over the steam rail- 
roads should be rebuilt the full width of the street at Broad- 
way, (North Somerville) Prospect Street and Washington 
Street, near Union Square ; and the steam railroad bridge over 
Washington Street (East Somerville) reconstructed with in- 
creased head-room for street traffic, — the dangerous railroad 
grade crossing at Park Street should be abolished, as decreed 
by the courts a number of years ago. 



346 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



I respectfully refer to some of the more important rec- 
ommendations and suggestions made in reports of the city 
engineer for a number of years past, which are for the im- 
provement of conditions in this city. 



FOR VARIOUS DEPART- 
OF CITY'S ACREAGE 



COMPILED TABLE OF AREAS, USEFUL 
ME NTS, SHOWING A SUB-DIVISION 

Land and water, total area city (4.22 
square miles) 

Water 

Streets 

Boulevards — City and State 

Squares 

Steam railroads, locations 

Frieght, distribution areas 

Parks 

Athletic fields and playgrounds 

(30) Schoolhouse lots 

(7) Fi^e station lots 

Miscellaneous city building lots and in- 
stitutions 

(42) Church lots 

(30) Large manufacturing and mercan- 
tile plants 

Tufts College Land 

Areas vacant and refilled marsh land.... 



Approximate dwelling area built upon .... 
Approximate number of dwellings in city, 15170. 
Average area to a dwelling about 4350 square feet. 
Average persons to an acre (built upon) 65. 

(Somerville is the most densely populated suburban city in 

the U. S.) 







2700 


acres 


100 


acres 






514 


acres 






22.5 


acres 






11 


acres 






90 


acres 






26 


acres 






39 


acres 






43 


acres 






24.5 


acres 






2.5 


acres 






28 


acres 






13.5 


acres 






115 


acres 






31 


acres 






125 


acres 










1185 


acres 








1515 


acres 



CITY ENGINEER 



SEWElR DIVISION 



The designing and constructing of sewers, storm drains, 
catch basins, house drains, etc., — maintenance of the drain- 
age system and other items in this division are under the 
direction, supervision and control of the city engineer. 

A large number of sewers were petitioned for and con- 
structed during the year in newly laid out streets, on account 
of extensive building operations. 

One of the city's principal outlets for storm water (a 
structure 7^4 feet by 11 feet) had to be re-located and con- 
structed on the easterly side of Middlesex Avenue and thence 
discharging into Mystic River, on account of the Ford Motor 
Company's building construction; the old wooden box drain, 
constructed across this property by the B. and M. R. R. Cor- 
poration in the year 1902, being abandoned. 

A number of new sewers and storm drains will have to 
be constructed and alterations made in the city's drainage 
system, immediately, on account of the laying out and con- 
structing of the new state boulevard and traffic road across 
the easterly end of this city. 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES,. 

1925 

Labor (city dept.) . $5,051 17 

Labor (contract) 68,914 50 

Teaming and trucking 1,017 09 

Materials and supplies 14,236 83 

Total Expenditure $89,219 59" 

CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Constructing sewers (separate system) .... $12,410 23 

Constructing sewers (combined system) .... 29 48 

Constructing storm drains 71,600 69 

Constructing catch basins 4,249 19 

Constructing new manholes on old sewers 146 00 



Cost of new work $88,435 59 

Materials for other depts. — credits, etc. 91 17 

Materials on hand 692 83 

Total $89,219 59 

CREDIT 

Appropriations $89,000 00 

Balance unexpended, 1924 3,446 90 

Service Transfers and Credits 6,091 17 

Total $98,538 07 



Balance unexpended (over to 1926) $9,318 48 



348 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Twenty-eight new sewers and storm drains were con- 
structed during the year ; a length of 16,220 feet, approximate- 
ly three miles, part of the work being done by department 
labor, the remainder by contract. 

See tabular statement for 1925, showing itemized account 
of work. 

Total length, city's drainage system 118.646 miles 

Cost of construction (including catch basins) $1,477,741 00 

The 1918 report contains a compiled table of Storm 
Drains constructed showing length, cost, date of construc- 
tion, district benefited, etc. 

Assessments, Metropolitan sewerage system, 1925 

(City's proportional cost) $109,022 32 

Total paid Commonwealth of Massachusetts for state 

sewer (1892—1925, inclusive) $2,025,247 35 

Total length Metropolitan sewerage system mains 

running through this city 3.475 miles 

14 connections, in Somerville, with Metropolitan sewerage mains. 

Locations of city's mains connecting with state sewer in 1912 

report, and details of construction in previous reports. 

New catch basins constructed in city's highways 1925 38 

Total catch basins constructed and maintained by sewer 

division 2,004 

Other catch basins— State, R. R. Co., etc 166 

Total catch basins in the city for storm drainage purposes 2,170 

The "separate system" sewers should be extended in the 
older sections of the city each year, as the appropriation will 
allow, and storm drains completed in certain localities as 
previously recommended: — especially in the North Somerville 
District, where the discharge is across the boundary line into 
City of Medford, "Two Penny Brook" outlet; also a "flood- 
ing relief" project in Morrison Avenue — Highland Road area 
and the B. and M. railroad valley; and a storm overflow at 
the East Cambridge line extending from the Somerville Ave- 
nue sewer and discharging into Miller's River. 

No agreement has been reached concerning a new loca- 
tion and size of outlet for discharging storm water into Mys- 
tic River, where the Consolidated Rendering Co. has placed 
filling material in the natural drainage outlet and along 
the shore of the river. 

Sidewalk sewers in Mossland Street should be construct- 
ed immediately and sections of the old sewers in Poplar Street 
and Franklin Avenue reconstructed, — thereby relieving the 
continuous blocking of house drains in these streets under 
existing conditions. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS AND STORM DRAINS BUILT IN 192S 



ITEMS OF CONSTRUCTION AND COST 



Nam* of StTMt 



Bailey Road Sewer 

Bailey Road Storm Drain 
Century Street Sewer 



Edgar Court Sewer 



Edgar Terrace Sewer 



Edgar Avenue Sewer . 



Fellsway West Sewer 

Feilsway West Storm Drain 



Gov. Winthrop Road Sewer 

Gov. Winthrop Road Storm Drain . 
Jaquea Street Sewer , 



Meacham Street Sewer 



Puritan Road Sewer 

Puritan Road Storm Drain . 

Puritan Road Sewer 

Puritan Road Storm Drain , 

Putnam Road Sewer 

Putnam Road Storm Drain . 

Putnam Road Sewer 

Putnam Road Storm Drain 

Shore Drive Sewer 

Shore Drive Storm Drain 

Silvey Place Sewer 



Ten Hills Road Sewer 

Ten Hills Road Storm Drain 

Ten Hills Road Sewer 

Ten Hills Road Storm Drain 
Washington Terrace Sewer 



Fellsway West 
Fellsway West 
Meacham Street 

Century Street 

Century Street 

Meacham Street 

Mystic Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Feilsway West 

Fellsway West 

Edgar Avenue 

Ash Avenue 

Mystic River 

Metropolitan Sewer 
Fellsway West 

Fellsway West 

Shore Drive 

Shore Drive 

Fellsway West 

Fellsway West 

Shore Drive 

Shore Drive 

Puritan Road 

Puritan Road 

Craigle Street 

Fellsway West 
Fellsway West 
Shore Drive 
Shore Drive 
Washington Street 



• Labor furnished by property owner 

Labor and materials furnished by property owner 



Near Temple Road 
Near Temple Road 
Edgar Terrace 

Near Edgar Avenue 

Near Edgar Avenue 

Near Heath Street 

Puritan Road 

Puritan Road 

Near Temple Road 
Near Temple Road 
Southeasterly 

Edgar Avenue 

Tide Gate Chamber 
In Middlesex Avenue 

Fellsway West 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Near Temple Road 

Ten Hills Road 

Ten Hills Road 

Near Lowell Street 

Near Temple Road 
Near Temple Road 
Near Temple Road 
Near Temple Road 
Northerly 



City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

Bartholomew Burke 

for 

Property Owner 

Bartholomew Burke [ 

for 

Property Owner 

Bartholomew Burke 

for 

Property Owner 

Denis I. Crimmlngs, 

Day 

Labor 

City — Day Labor 

City — Day Labor 

City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

Denis I. Crimmlngs 

Day 

Labor 

Denis I. Crimmlngs 

Day 

Labor 

James H. Fannon 



City — Day Labor 
City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

City— Day Labor 

Property Owner 



Filling 

Filling 

Sand and Ledge 

Hard Pan and Ledge 



SUB-DRAIN 



EXCAVATION 



863.0 
8 j 371.8 



Hard Pan and Ledge 

Filling and Clay 
Filling and Clay 

Filling 

Filling 

Gravelly Hard Pan 

Hard Pan and Ledge 

Filling and Clay 

Clay 
Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 



City— Day Labor J Clayey Hard Pan 
Clayey Hard Pan 



City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

City — Day Labor 

Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

Denis I. Crlmmings 

for 

Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

and 
Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

City — Day Labor 

Property Owner 

City — Day Labor 

Bartholomew Burke 

for 

Property Owner 



Clayey Hard Pan 

Clay 

Clay 
Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 
' Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan 

Clayey Hard Pan [ 5'-5 
Gravelly Hard Pan 



4'-3" 
6'11" 



[ 236.0 



} | 



734.9 
736.9 



90xl32| 1,392.6 I 4 and 6 



8 | 605.0 
I 

I 
8 I 605.0 



rV-lT 



6'-5" 



655.9 
451.8 



819.5 
819.5 



MANHOLES 



67.30 
148.00 



Sewer | Sewer 
1 67.30 

1 | 67.30 



COST PER LINEAR FOOT 



Excavation 



in 



{0.05 
0.03 



0.67 
0.30 



(ICombi-l 256.09 

nation I | 
3 CombI- 91.99 

nation | 

See | See 

Sewer [ Sewer 

I 

2 I 

Combi- 83.38 

nation j 

See I See 
Sewer | Sewer 



12 | 4.54 

I 



7 | 4.54 



Combi- | 83.11 30 

nation | 

See I See | 

Sewer Sewer 28 



Combi- | 118.26 | — 
nation 

See I See | 

Sewer Sewer j — 



See | ■ See | 



0.76 
0.27 

0.27 

0.29 

0.29 

0.29 



0.03 | 

0.05 



0.01 
0.20. 



0.05 
0.01 
0.04 



0.28 

0.32 

i I 

0.32 | 0.02 | 



M99.28 
391.74 



eacham 
Street 


Meacbam 
Street 


Mea- 
cham St. 


1.864.60 


932.30 


932.30 


1,134.56 





1,134.56 


461.72 


461.72 






Meacham 
Street 


Meacham 
Street 


Mea- 
cham St. 


4,434.64 


2,978.16 


1,456.48 


67,792.14 
Un- 
completed 
1,251.21 





67,792.14 
1,251.21 


429.40 


429.40 




336.32 





336.32 


574.00 


To Be 


574.00 



302.68 

237.86 

484.00 j 

334.00 [ 

1,133.00 | 
I 



521.30 | 
I 
I 

368.31 I 

451.00 | 
I 

I I 

| 292.00 | 

I I 



237.86 
484.00 
334.00 



74.32 
( Un- 
completed 

17.79 



451.00 
292.00 



16220.7 (3.0721 miles) Sewers and Storm Drain 



584,040.40 J6.114.84 J77.9z6.56 



Total ength of public sewers In the city Jan. lBt, 1926 

Total length ot private sewers In the city Jan. 1st, 1926 

Total length of sewers In the City Jan 1st, 1926 

Total length of storm drains in the city Jan. 1st, 1926 

lota length of the city drainage system Jan. 1st, 1926 

lotal length of Metropolitan sewerage system mains 

In the city ' 



= 617,018.8 = 97.920 

= 34,896.0 = 6.609 

= 551,914.8 = 104.629 

= 73,885.3 = 13.993 

— 625,800.1 = 118.523 



CITY ENGINEER 



349 



The city's drainage system will be greatly improved 
when all the foregoing changes are made and construction 
work completed. 

MANTENANCE ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 1925 

Labor $12,712 64 

Teaming and trucking 1,017 09 

Equipment, supplies and repairing property 2,157 69 

Total Expenditure $24,982 12 

CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Maintenance of sewers, including cleaning, 

flushing, supervision, etc. (118.65 

miles) $5,957 95 

Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning, and 

and flushing, supervision, etc. (2004) 13,774 50 
'Maintenance of storm water pump, Medford 

Street 642 63 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

catch basins 939 15 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

manholes 165 70 

Repairing old sewers and storm drains.... 464 57 

Inspection and location of house drains .... 729 97 

Equipment and supplies 1,244 29 

Repairs of tools and property 173 95 

Maintenance of sewer division yards (2) 812 34 

Telephone (2) 77 07 

Total Expenditure $24,982 12 

CREDIT 

Appropriation $25,000 00 

Balance unexpended $17 88 

Value of tools and property on hand, maintenance of 
Sewers, $2,000. 

A permanent force of men, varying in number from 
eight to thirteen per week, and teams are kept continually 
at work flushing, cleaning and repairing the city's drainage 
system, catch basins, etc., the expense necessarily increasing 
yearly as lengths of sewers, storm drains and catch basins 
are added to the system, and the distance increased to the 
dumping places, which are fast diminishing, only two being 
available at present. 

The scarcity of dumping places has confronted the city 
for some time and various schemes have been considered for 
efficient and economical methods of disposal but no feasible 
plan has been adopted. 



350 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Material removed from catch basins and hauled to 

dumps cubic yards 3250 

Average cost, (labor $1.78; teaming $2.46) 

per cubic yard $4 24 

Average cost, cleaning, flushing and general maint- 
enance per basin $6 87 

Average cost, cleaning and flushing drainage system 

including catch basins per mile $166 30 

There are about twenty catch basins (average) to a 
mile of roadway in this city. 

An auto-truck cleaning machine for catch basins, of an 
approved design, could be used advantageously in this city 
about one-half time during the year — the result being speed- 
ier cleaning ; and at other times utilized in various- work in 
other divisions of the Engineering Department. 

A number of repairs have been made on some of the old 
sewers, alterations made in the outlets and overflows, and 
extra manholes built for the purpose of improving the system. 

Many catch basins and manholes have been repaired. 

Three hundred and eighty-four permits have been is- 
sued to licensed drain layers for connecting buildings with 
main sewers and storm drains; eighty-nine being for repairs, 
alterations or extensions, all of the work being done under 
the supervision of the city's inspector. 

Many of these repairs and alterations were made nec- 
essary by the growth of tree roots in the private drain pipe. 
In several cases, these private drains were relaid with iron 
pipe and lead joints; which is the type of construction recom- 
mended by this department, where drain connections have 
become stopped on account of tree roots. 

Certain persons are licensed as drain layers by the city 
and are under bonds, for the purpose of laying and repair- 
ing these private drains : — none others are permitted to do 
this work. 

Reference to data concerning each drain connection with 
the public sewer is on file in this office, and time and expense 
could be saved by the owner, by applying directly to this 
department for investigation and advice, where trouble exists. 

A number of car track catch basins and underground 
conduit manholes have been connected with the city's drainage 
system. 

There are to date about 17,666 private drain connections 
with the city's drainage system. 

A better system of grease traps should be installed in 
the premises of some of the larger manufacturing plants and 
rendering companies to prevent large amounts of grease and 
waste products from escaping into city sewer mains and at 
various times has partially blocked sections of sewers. 



CITY ENGINEER 



9K1 



PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS DIVISION 

This division has the care and maintenance of about 
$2 acres of land laid out as parks and playgrounds, being about 
equally divided in area — pleasure parks and playfields. 

Seventy-three acres are owned by the city and certain 
areas owned by private parties are turned over to the city 
for recreation purposes, also satisfactory arrangements have 
been made for a number of years past, whereby the city has 
the use of Tufts College playfields during the summer vaca- 
tion months. 

These areas when completely developed will compare 
favorably with other cities in the vicinity. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

1925 

Playgrounds Parks 

$5,061 62 Labor $8,784 85 

609 00 Teaming and Trucking 670 51 

830 61 Equipment— Supplies 1,693 54 

282 77 Repairing property and tools . 409 39 

65 24 Fountains and Bubblers — Maint. (Paid water 

Dept.) 366 39 

Trees — Shrubs — Plants — Foral Decorations 1,879 60 

Flagpoles — Flags — Painting 58 09 

Repairing roadways and walks — trimming 

trees, etc 1,441 25 

800 00 *Transferred to City Engineer Account 

$7,649 24 Total Expenditures $15,303 62 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Playgrounds 

and 
Recreation Parks 

$434 00 Central Hill Park (13.1 acres) $3,772 87 

865 71 Foss Park (formerly Broadway Park) (15.9 

acres) 2,650 06 

Broadway Parkway (1.6 acres) 182 77 

2,125 06 Lincoln Park (7.2 acres) 1,205 20 

153 37 Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) 1,794 10 

Tufts Park (4.5 acres) 1,556 59 

Paul Revere Park (0.02 acres) 131 44 

3 76 Belmont Street Park (0.4 acres) 561 55 

Powder House Boulevard (0.9 mile long) 667 15 

Powder House Square Parkway (0.1 acre) 68 64 

Cemetery, Somerville Avenue (0.7 acre) 45 54 

605 98 Somerville Field, at Alewife Brook (9.5 acres) 
1,376 32 Dilboy Field (formerly part of Somerville 

Field) at Alewife Brook (5.5 acres) 669 93 

759 26 Richard Trum Playground, Cedar Street and 

Broadway (4.3 acres) 218 50 

17.14 Playground, Glen Street and Oliver Street 

(1.0 acre + 1.5 acres private land) 1,240 83 



352 ANNUAL REPORTS 

183 12 Playground, Kent Street and Somerville Aven- 
ue (0.8 acre) 174 26 

74 97 Playground, Poplar Street and Joy Street 

(0.5 acre) 252 04 

Playground, Beacon Street near Washington 

Street (0.2 acre) 

60 53 Playground, Fellsway East (2.5 acres private 

land) 

8 82 Playground, corner Elm Street — Cherry 

Street and Sartwell Avenue (2.1 acres ) 69 95 

Shaw Playground, Broadway at Western Jun- 
ior High School (2.8 acres) 

181 20 Tufts College Land, Summer Playground (5 

acres) 42 20 

800 00 *Transferred 

$7,649 24 Total expenditures, maintenance (81.8 acres) $15,303 62 
72.1 acres city property -f- 9 acres private 
land, 0.7 acre cemetery and 0.9 mile boule- 
vard, and 0.54 mile parkway roads. 

CREDIT 

Playgrounds 

and 
Recreation Parks 

Appropriation for Parks $15,000 00 

$7,650 00 Appropriation for Playgrounds 

Transfers 373 38 

$7,650 00 $15,373 38 

$ 76 Balance unexpended $ 69 76 

IMPROVEMENT WARD SIX PLAYGROUND 
EXPENDITURES 

Labor, trucking, rolling, etc. — grading $3,397 18 

Fence, grass — seed, etc 1,779 21 

Transfer to Construction Field House — Som. Field 700 00 

$5,876 39 

CREDIT 

Appropriation $5,000 00 

Balance appropriation 1924 1,294 09 

Sale materials 10 00 

$6,304 09 

Balance unexpended $427 70 

Assessments for Metropolitan parks and boulevards 

(City's proportional cost) $86,198 34 

Total paid Commonwealth of Massachusetts — Metro- 
politan park system, to January 1, 1926 $1,238,932 42 

Total length Metropolitan boulevard in Somerville 2.33 miles 



CITY ENGINEER 353 

The route across this city of the new boulevard and 
traffic road — Northern Traffic Artery has been determined ; 
land has been taken and a number of buildings removed and 
probably construction work will be commenced immediately. 

All of the city's playfield areas have been in constant 
use throughout the year; — special supervision was provided 
by the Welfare and Receation Commission during the months 
of July and August expecially for the children's activities, 
to make the playgrounds popular and successful ; an exhibi- 
tion featured the closing of the summer work. 

Tufts College playfield was under the city's supervision 
during the summer, — "twilight baseball" being very popular. 

At the athletic field bordering Alewife Brook, a perma- 
nent field house has been constructed with all modern equip- 
ment and construction of an out-door winter running track 
commenced, which will also provide a hockey rink and wad- 
ing pool. The remaining area should be graded as soon as 
possible and when completed as originally designed, the city 
will own one of the best recreation fields in the vicinity. 

(In the 1910 report, plan shows proposed complete lay- 
ing out.) 

The city has become so densely populated (averaging 
nearly 25,000 people a square mile) that some of the larger 
park areas should be more extensively utilized for public rec- 
reation and physical training purposes. On several of the 
pi ay fields concrete buildings should be constructed, addition- 
al apparatus and shelters provided and some of the smaller 
playground areas should be enclosed by wire fencing for pro- 
tection. 

In certain localities of the city, well-lighted play- 
grounds, during the summer evenings, should be maintained 
for the young men and women who are obliged to work in 
the day time. 

Previous reports are respectfully referred to for sug- 
gestions and recommendations for improvement of park and 
playground areas. 

In connection with the departmental work, the Welfare 
and Recreation Commission, the Playgrounds Association and 
Women's Clubs have been of great assistance in advising, 
directing and promoting the city's welfare. (Details, etc., 
in Commission's and Association reports.) 

(See city auditor's report for total expenditure by city 
departments and commissions for recreation and play the 
past year.) 



354 ANNUAL REPORTS 

APPENDED TABLE 

Annexed to this report is a table giving names of all 
streets in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and 
the total mileage; in the 1910 report, tables were published 
showing old names of certain streets as formerly known, and 
the names of public squares in the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer. 



CITY ENGINEER 



355 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 









Public 


Width 


Length. 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. Public Private 


Abdell 


Somerville ave 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


25 




20f 


Aberdeen road Cedar st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


449 


...... 


Aberdeen rd. i 


ex. Angle 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 




•7 


Acadia pk. 


Somerville ave 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


256 


...... 


Adams 


Broadway 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


907 




Adelaide rd 


Somerville ave 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




138 


Adrian 


Marion st. 


Joseph st. 


Public. 


40 


579 




Albion pi. 


Albion st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


10 




166 


Albion ct. 


Albion st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 




116 


Albion 


Central st. 


Cedar st. 


Public. 


40 


2,742 




Albion 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




100 


Albion ter. 


Albion st. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


25 


100 




Aldersey 


Walnut st. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


508 




Aldrich 


Pearl st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


40 


611 




JtAlewifeBrkpkjMystic Val. pky. Cambridge lint 


> Public. 




4,775 




Alfred 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




50 


Allen 


Somerville ave 


Charlestown st. 


Public. 


25 


644 




Allen ct 


Park st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Alpine 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


30 


667 




Alpine 


Alpine st. 


Low 'ill st. 


Public. 


40 


688 




Alston 


Cross st. 


Shawmut St. 


Public. 


40-30 


757 




Ames 


Bartlett st. 


Robinson st. 


Public. 


40 


580 




Appleton 


Willow ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


668 




Arlington 


Franklin st. 


Lincoln st. 


Public. 


40 


452 




Arnold ave 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


15 




127 


Arnold ct. 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


10 




115 


Arthur ct. 


Linden st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


about 1C 


i 


100 


Arthur 


Broadway 


Bonair st. 


Public. 


40 


438 




Ash ave. 


Meacham st. 


East Albion st. 


Public. 


40 


554 




♦Ash ave. 


East Albion st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


40 




151 


Ashland 


Summer st. 


Sartwell ave. 


Public. 


30 


478 




Atherton 


Central st. 


Spring st. 


Public. 


40 


741 




Auburn ave. 


Cross st. 


B. & L. R. R 


Public. 


30 


606 




Austin 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


716 




Autumn 


Broadway 


Romir st. 


Public. 


20 


408 




Avon 


School st. 


Central st. 


Public. 


40 


1,360 




Avon pi. 


Cross st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


25 




130 


Bailey road 


Fellsway 


Shore Drive 


Private 


40 




1711 


Bailey 


North st. 


West Adams st. 


Public. 


40 


420 




Banks 


Elm st. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


639 




Bartlett 


Vernon st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,550 




Barton 


Broadway 


Hamilton road 


Public. 


40 


382 


••••»* 


Bay State ave 


. Broadway 


Foskett st. 


Public. 


40 


1,237 




Beach ave. 


Webster ave. 


Columbia st. 


Private, 


about 20 




200 


Beacon pi. 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 




200 


Beacon 


E.CambridgellneSomerville ave 


Public. 


66 


6,007 




Beacon ter. 


Somerville ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


24 




110 


Bean ter. 


Cutter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 




100 


Beckwith circle Beacon st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


28.5 




112 


Bedford 


South st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


30 


165 




Beech 


Somerville ave. 


Atherton st. 


Public. 


40 


323 




Belknap 


Broadway 


Hamilton road 


Public. 


40 


449 




Bellevue ter. 


Albion st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




90 


Belmont 


Somerville ave 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


2,192 




Belmont pi. 


Belmont st. 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


25 


177 




Belmont sq. 


Belmont st. 


Sout.heasterlv 


Public. 


30 


75 




Belmont sq. 


End of above 


N. E. & S. W. 


Public. 


20 


145 




Belmont ter. 


Belmont st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


15 




137 


Benedict ave. 


Broadway 


Benedict st. 


Private. 


20 




200 


Benedict 


Fnion st. 


Austin st. 


Public. 


40 


585 




Bennett ct. 


Bennett st. 


Prospect st. 


Private. 


10 




100 


Bennett 


Prospect st. 


Bennett ct. 


Private. 


40 to 25 




400 


ttMetroDolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 








♦Proposed. 













356 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



of Public and 



Street 

Benton road 
Berkeley 
Berwick 
Bigelow 
Billingham 
Bishop's pi. 
Blakeley ave. 
Bleachery ct. 
Bolton 
Bonair 
Bond 

Bonner ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 

Boston ave. 

Boston ave. 

Boston 

Boston 

Bow 

Bow 

Bowdoin 

Bowers ave. 

Bow St. pi. 

Bradford ave. 

Bradley 

Braemore road 

Brastow ave. 

Bristol road 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Brdadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway pi. 

Bromfield road 

Brook 

Browning road 

Buckingham 

Buena Vista rd. 

Burnham 

Burnside ave. 

Cady ave. 

Cady ave. 
Caldwell ave. 
Calvin 
Calvin 
Cambria 
Cameron ave. 
Campbell pk. 
Campbell Pk. pi 
Carlton 

Carter terrace 
Caruso pi. 
Carver 
Cedar ave. 
Cedar ct. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar 

Central road 
Central road 



From 

Summer st. 
School st. 
Hinckley st. 
Boston st. 
Broadway 
Glen st. 
Fellsway east 
Somerville ave. 
Oak st. 
Cross st. 
Broadway 
Washington st. 
Medford line 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Highland road 
Prichard ave. 

Angle in st. s'ly 
Kidder ave. 
Washington st. 
Prosp't Hill av. 
Union sq. 
Wesley sq. 
Washington st. 
Cottage ave. 
Bow st. 
School st. 
Pearl st. 
Broadway 
Lowell st. 
Broadway 
Charlest'n line 
Cross st. 
Marshall st. 
Main st. 
Top of hill 
Albion st. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Broadway 
Warner st. 
Glen st. 
Sycamore st. 
Beacon st. 
Holland st. 
Broadway 
Elm st. 

Simpson ave. 



To 

Hudson st. 
Central st. 
Northwesterly 
Munroe st. 
William st. 
Easterly 
Cross st. 
Fitchburg R.R. 
Houghton st. 
Walnut st. 
Jaques st. 
Columbus ave. 
Mystic river 
Medford line 
Highland road 
Prichard ave. 
East to angle 

in street 
Kidder ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Prosp't Hili av. 
Walnut st. 
Wesley sq. 
Somerville ave. 
Lincoln park 
Elm st. 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Walter st. 
Medford line 
Porter st. 
Medford line 
Cross st. 
Marshall st. 
Main st. 
Top of hill 
Albion st. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Arlington line 
Southwesterly 
Dearborn road 
Cross st. 
Central st. 
Dimick st. 
Southwesterly 
Pow. House Bl. 
Summer st. 



W. side Corin 
thian road 
Corinthian roadDead end 
Washington st. Southerly 



Beacon st. 
Dimick st. 
Central st. 
Holland st. 
Meacham rd. 
Kingston St. 



Dimick st. 
Washington st. 
Benton road 
Cambridge line 
Kingston st. 
Arl'ton Br. R.R. 



Somerville ave. Lake st. 



Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Porter st. 
Cedar st. 
Cedar st. 
Murdock st. 



Southwesterly 

Easterly 

Northwesterly 

Linden ave. 

Southeasterly 

Southwesterly 



Hedar n Elm st. Southeasterly 
Elm st. Broadway 

Central st. E'ly and N'ly 

Central road Sycamore st. 



Public 


Width 


Length 




or 


in 






Private 


Feet Public Private 


Public. 


40 


1,208 




Public. 


40 


1,36U 




Private. 


20 




170 


Public. 


50 


208 




Public. 


40 


563 


, ..... 


Private. 


10 


• • • • 


75 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


680 


Private. 


30 


• . • • 


450 


Public. 


40 


476 


• • • • 


Public. 


40 


1,535 


• • • • 


Public. 


40 


655 




Public. 


40 


376 


. . . . 


Public. 


60 


915 




Public. 


50 


80 




Public. 


65 


287 


» » • 


Public. 


50 


509 


# # 


Private. 


50 





146 


Private. 


40 




376 


Public. 


40 


'649 




Public. 


45 


640 


• • * 


Public. 


40 


1,242 


• ■ • 


Public. 


60 


858 


• • • 


Public. 


50 


570 


• • « 


Public. 


40 


341 


• • • 


Private. 


24 


• • • • 


288 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


300 


Private. 


40 




150 


Public. 


40 


762 


m 


Private. 


40 


• • • 


> 


Public. 


40 


686 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


146 




Public. 


100 


2,590 


• • • 


Pub. 100 to 200 


2,060 


■ • • • 


Public. 


100 


1,570 


■ • • • 


Public. 


100 to 90 


1,030 


• • • * 


Public. 


90 


2,540 


• • • • 


Public. 


90 to 70 


1,030 


* • • • 


Public. 


70 


3,250 


• • • 


Public. 


65-60-65 


3,220 


» • • • 


Private. 


22 


• • • 


250 


Public. 


40 


1,262 




Public. 


40 


504 


■ ■ • a 


Public. 


40 


679 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


292 


^ # 


Private. 


35 


• • • • 


27S 


Public. 


40 


543 




Public. 


40 


720 


... 


Public. 


40 


158 




Private. 


40 




45 


Private. 


20 




S10 


Public. 


40 


263 


• • • 


Public. 


30 


392 




Public. 


40 


488 


• • • 


Public. 


60 


1,065 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


399 




Private. 


20 




84 


Public. 


40 


'300 




Public. 


40 


171 


... 


Private. 


10 


• • • • 


110 


Private. 


40 


• • * • 


156 


Public 


22 


293 


m m 


Private. 


15 + 





ro+ 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


378 


Private. 


12 + 


? 


10+ 


Public. 


40 


4,137 




Public. 


40 


377 


. . . 


Public. 


30 to 15 


221 


. . * 



CITY ENGINEEI 



357 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Albion st. 
Meacham st. 
Park ave. 
College ave. 
Sycamore st. 



Street From 

Central 
Central 
Central 
Centre 
Century- 
Chandler 
Chapel 
Chapel ct. 
Charles 
Charlestown 
Charnwood rd. 
Cherry 
Cherry 
Chester 
Chester ave. 
Chester ave. 
Chester pi. 
Chestnut 
Chetwynd road 
Church 
City road 
Claremon 
Clarendon ave. 
Clark 
Cleveland 
Clifton 
Clifton 
Clyde 

College ave. 
College Cir. 



To 



Somerville ave. Summer st. 



Medford st. 

Broadway 

B. & L. R. R. Private. 



Public 

or 
Private 

Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Dead End 
Broadway 
Chandler st. 
Northwesterly 



Washington st. Southerly 
Allen st. Merriam st. 

Willow ave. 
Elm st. 
Highland ave. 
Elm st. 



Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



33 

40 
45 
35 
40 
40 
40 
12 
30 
15 
40 
45 
45 
40 



043 
539 
079 



College Hill rd. 

Columbia 

Columbia ct. 

Columbus ave. 

Concord ave. 

Concord ave. 

Congress pi. 

Conlon ct. 

Connecticut av. 

Conwell ave. 

Conwell 

Cooney 

Corinthian road 

Cottage ave. 

Cottage circle 

Cottage pi. 

Craigie 

Craigie ter. 

Crescent 

Crescent 

Crest Hill road 

Crocker 

Cross 

Cross st. (East) 

Cross St. pi. 

Crown 

Cummings 

Curtis ave. 

Curtis 

Cutler 

Cutter ave. 

Cutter pk. 

Cutter 

Cypress 



Hancock st. 

Highland ave. 

Northeasterly 

Cambridge line Public. 
Medford St. Angle 

Angle Cross st. Public. 

Chester st. Northwesterly Private. 

Poplar st. Southeasterly Public. 

Curtis st. West Adams st. Public. 

Summer st. Lake st. Public. 

Broadway Cedar st. Private. 

Holland st. Mead st. Public. 

Broadway Cambridge line Public. 

Newton st. Lincoln pky. Public. 

Central st. Harvard st. Public. 

Appleton st. Morrison ave. Public. 
Morrison ave. Arlngtn Br. RR Private. 
Cedar st. Murdock st. Public. 

Davis sq. Medford line Public. 

College av. around to College av.Private. 10 and 12 
Conwell ave. North st. Public. 40 

Webster ave. Cambridge line Public. 40 

Columbia st. Webster ave. Private. 9 

Washington 8t. Walnut st. Public. 40 1 

Prospect st. Wyatt st. Public. 40 1 

Wyatt st. Beacon st. Public. 30 

Somerville ave. Linwood st. Public. 50 

Columbia st. Easterly Private. 20 

Mystic ave. Penn. ave. Public. 40 

Curtis st. North st. Public. 40 

Highland ave. Southwesterly Public. 35 

Beacon st. Line st. Public. 30 

Broadway Cady ave. Public. 40 

Russell st. Chester st. Public 40 

Cottage ave. Southwesterly Private. 25 



Public, about 22 
20 
40 
40 
40 
40 
45 
40 
40 
35 
40 
40 
40 
30 
60 



,232 
273 

166 

589 
,450 

*885 
220 
451 

537 

852 
964 

560 
,217 
552 
459 
200 

664 
,080 

449 
816 

,425 
,483 
472 
202 

'487 
,346 
363 
245 

560 
550 



Washington st. Northwesterly 
Somerville ave. Summer st 
16 Craigie st. Westerly 



Boston line 
Hadley st. 
Ten Hills rd. 
Highland ave. 
Medford st. 
Broadway 
Cross st. 
Porter st. 
Fellsway 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Hinckley st. 
Summer st. 
Cutter ave. 
Broadway 
Central st. 



Hadley st. 
Pearl st. 
Shore Drive 
Crown st. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Northwesterly 
Lowell st. 
Middlesex ave. 
Hillsdale road 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Northwesterly 
Webster st. 
Beech st. 



Private, about 11 . 
Public. 50 1 

Private. 25 
Public 30 and 22 



Public. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 



Dana Pearl st. Bonair st. Public. 

Dane Somerville ave. Washington st. Public. 

Dane ave. Dane st. Leland st. Public 

Dante terrace Craigie st. Westerly Private 

Dartmouth Medford st. Broadway Public. 



30 
40 
40 
45 
40 
24 
30 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
12 
40 
40 

40 
40 
30 

25 
40 



280 

387 
174 

528 

680 
100 



2, 



654 
357 

480 

'730 
262 



696 

1,341 

569 



200 
388 



130 

400 

iio 
'266 

980 

226 

284 

iso 

200 



1,465 



87 
160 

126 



251 



150 
700 
625 



170 

"m 



125 



358 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 



Day 

Dearborn road 

Delaware 

Dell 

Derby 

Dexter 

Dickinson 

Dickson 

Dimick 

Dix pL 

Douglas ave. 

Dover 

Dow 

Downer pi. 

Downer 

Dresden circle 

Durant 

Durham 

Dynamo 

Earle 
Earle 
East Albion 

East Albion 

East Albion 

East Albion 

Eastman road 

Edgar ave. 

Edgar ct. 

Edgar ter. 

Edmands 

Edmonton ave. 

Electric ave. 

Eliot 

Ellington road 

Ellington road 

Ellsworth 

Elm ct. 

Elm pi. 

Elm road 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm 

EBm 

Elm 

Elm 

Elmwood 

Elmwood ter. 

Elston 

Emerson 

Enrh'cott ave. 

Essex 
Eustis 

Everett ave. 
Everett 
Evergreen ave. 
Evergreen sq. 
Exchange pi. 

Fairfax 



Elm st. 
Boston ave. 
Pearl st. 
Glen st. 
Temple st. 
Broadway 
Springfield st. 
Broadway 
Concord ave. 
Linwood st. 
Edgar ave. 
Elm st. 
Powder House 

Bd. 
Downer st. 
Nashua st. 
Cutter ave. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Willow ave. 



To 

Cambridge line 
College ave. 
Aldrich st. 
Tufts st. 
Wheatland st. 
Medford line 
Beacon st. 
Fairmount ave. 
Calvin st. 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Cambridge line 
Ware st. 



Public 

or 
Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public 

Public. 

Public. 



B. & L. R. R. Private. 
Southeasterly Private. 
Westerly Private. 

Southerly Private. 

Hanson st. Public. 

Whipple st. Private. 



South st. Northerly Private 

End of above Fitchburg R. R. Private 
Mt. Vernon E. of Moreland Private. 

ave. st. 

E. of MorelandMoreland Private. 

st. 
Moreland st. West side Fre-Public. 

mont st. 
Fremont st. Medford line Private. 

Highland ave. Southwesterly Public. 
Main st. Meacham st. Private. 

Edgar Ave. Century st. Private 

Edgar Ave. Century st. Private 

near Bonair st. Public. 

Fellsway east Private. 



Broadway 
Cross st. 
Mason st. 
Vine st. 



Curtis st. Public. 

Park st. Public. 

Highland ave. Northeasterly Private. 

Ellington road Southeasterly Private. 

Cross st. Hush st. Public. 

Villa ave. Northwesterly Private. 

Harvard st. Westerly Private. 
Elm st. Northeasterly 
Somerville ave. Cherry st. 



Cherry st. 
White st. 
Banks st. 
Beech st. 
Tenney st. 
Holland st. 
Elmwood st. 
Elm st. 
Everett st. 
Broadway 

Medford st. 
Beacon st. 
Cross st. 
Webster ave. 
Marshall st. 
Porter st. 



Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
10 
30 
40 
40 



908 
469 
451 
466 
1,031 

"770 
271 
957 

162 
975 
257 



Washington st. Southerly 



White st 

Banks st. 

Beech st. 

Tenney st 

Davis sq. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Summer st. Public. 

Newton st. Private. 

Woodstock st. Private. 

(Ext'n) 
Richdale ave. Public. 
Cambridge line Public. 
Dana st. Public. 

Newton st. Private. 

Sycamore st. Public. 
Southeasterly 



Private. 
Private. 



North st. 



Fairlee Cherry st. 

Fairmount ave. Curtis st. 
Fairview ter. Sycamore st. 



Alewife Brk Pky Public. 

Northwesterly Public. 
Northwesterly Public. 
Southwesterly Private, 



20 

20 

30 

20 

40 423 

30 

30 

15 

25 

40 

31 285 

40 

40 296 

50 

40 

40 

40 376 

40 

40 1,374 

40 291 

35 

30 

40 230 

18 

30 

25 

63 1,672 

63 to 60 330 

60 660 

60 to 77.5 290 

77.5 to 60 570 

60 1,429 

40 1,057 

20 

40 396 

30 

40 

40 232 

30 146 

40 845 

30 

40 1,320 

22 

4.5 

40 933 

30 144 

40 679 
16 



2* 



100 



125 
120 
183 
200 

255 

322 
115 

188 

77 



128 

800 
118 
118 

'630 



120 
265 

"70 
190 
183 



190 

170 
800 



350 

T79 
70 



173 



CITY ENGINEER 



359 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Farragut ave. Broadway 

tJFellsway Mystic ave. 

JtFellsway east 

(Winthrop Broadway 
ave.) 
JJFellsway West 

(Chauncey) Broadway 



40 



Woodstock st. Public. 

(Ext'n) 
Mystic river Public. 70 to 130 



ave.) 
Fennell 
Fenwick 
Fisk ave. 
Fitchburg ct. 
Fitchburg 
Flint ave. 
Flint 
Florence 
Florence 
Forest 
Forster 
Foskett 
Fountain ave. 



ter. 



Hinckley st. 
Broadway 
Lowell st. 
Fitchburg st. 
Linwood st. 
Flint st. 
Franklin st. 
Washington st. 
Jaques st. 
Beacon st. 
Sycamore st. 
Willow ave. 
Cross st. 



Francesca ave. College ave. 



Francis 
Franklin ave. 
Franklin pi. 
Franklin 
Fremont ave. 
Fremont 
Fremont 
Fremont 

Garden ct. 
Garfield ave. 
Garfield ave. 
Garrison ave. 

Garrison ave. 

George 
Gibbens 
Giles pk. 
Gill's ct. 
Gilman 
Gilman ter. 
Gilson ter. 
Glen 

Glendale ave. 
Glen wood road 
Glover circle 
Gordon 
Gorham 
Gould ave 
Gove ct. 
Gov. Win'hp rd. 
Grand View a\ 
Granite 
Grant 
Greene 
Greenville 
Greenville ter. 
Greenwood ter. 
Gritter way 
Grove 



Porter st 
Washington st. 
Franklin st. 
Broadway 
Bowdoin st. 
Main st. 
Nr E. Albion st 
E. Albion st. 

Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Blakeley ave. 
Broadway 

Land City of 

Camb. 
Broadway 
Central st. 
Walnut st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross st. 
Pearl st. 
Linden ave. 
Broadway 
Cameron ave. 
Vernon st. 
Meacham road 
North st. 
Holland st. 
Porter st. 
Cedar st. 
Fellsway * 
Walnut st. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Greenville st. 
Beacon st. 
College ave. 
Elm st. 



Mystic ave. 



Mystic ave. 

Northwesterly 
Jaques st. 
Hinckley st. 
Southeasterly 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northerly 
Aldrich st. 
Perkins st. 
Southwesterly 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Liberty ave. 
Glen st. 
Liberty ave. 
Conwell st. 
Franklin st. 
Southeasterly 
Washington st, 
Lincoln pk. 
Nr E. Albion st 
E. Albion 
Northerly 



Public. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



Fitchburg R. R. Private 
Blakeley ave. Public. 
Middlesex ave. Private 
Land of City 

of Camb. 
Woodstock st. 

(Ext'n) 
Lincoln ave. 
Benton rd, w'ly Public. 
Northwesterly Public 
Westerly 
Walnut st. 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Tufts st. 
Yorktown st. 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 



Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 



Howard st. 
Southeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Shore Drive 
Vinal ave. 
Osgood st. 
Mystic ave. 
Laurel st. 
Munroe st. 
Northerly 
Northeasterly 
Bromfield rd. 
Morrison ave. 



Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 



Hadley ct. Franklin st. Westerly Private. 

Hall ave. College ave. Liberty ave. Public. 

Hall Cedar st. Cherry st. Public. 

Hamlet Highland ave. Boston st. Public. 

}} Metropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



50 



50 

20 

40 
20 
10 
40 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
30 
40 
30 
40 
30 
20 
15 

40 + 
30 
40 
40 
40 

25 
40 
40 
40 

40 

30 

40 

32.71 
10 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
16 
18 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
20 
25 
4 
40 



905 
2,500 
1,222 

1,324 



601 
484 



202 
1,790 
1,304 

'iii 

*668 

578 
762 
180 
575 

2,3i6 

232 

1,112 



183 

447 
460 



275 
665 
167 

1,430 
360 

2,373 

410 

1,524 

1,254 

763 



542 
411 
1,405 
555 
660 



996 



16 

40 926 

30 456 

30 616 



171 



22* 

400 



90 
480 



100 

*5» 

370 

982 

390 

100 
i24 

iio 



156 
144 

1527 



250 
165 
160 

74 



360 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 



From 



Pi. 



Hamilton 

Hammond 

Hancock 

Hancock 

Hanson ave. 

Hanson 

Hanson 

Hardan road 

Hardan road 

Harding 

Harold 

Harold 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Harvard 

Hathorn 

Hawthorne 

Hawkins 

Hayden ter. 

Heath 

Heath 

Henderson 

Hennessy ct. 

Henrietta ct. 

Henry ave. 

Herbert 

Hersey 

Higgins ct. 

High 

Highland ave 



road Russell road 
Dickinson st. 
Elm st. 
Highland ave 
Hanson st. 

Washington st. Skehan st. 
Skehan st. Vine st. 



Public 
To or 

Private 
North st. Public. 

Concord ave. Public. 
Highland ave. Public. 
Lexington ave. Public. 
Easterly Private. 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Pow. House Blv.Southerly Public 

End of above Ware st. Private 

No. of Ward st. Cambridge line Public. 



Dimick st. 
Woods ave. 
Ivaloo st. 
Elmwood st. 
Harvard st. 
Summer st. 
Broadway 
Willow ave. 



Marion st. 
Medford Line 

Kent st. 
Southeasterly 
Westerly 
Beech st. 
Arlington st. 
Cutter ave. 



Public. 

Private 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



Somerville ave. Washington st. Public. 



Linden ave. 
Temple st. 
Bond st. 
Richardson st. 
Medford st. 



Easterly 
Bond st. 
Moreland st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Fisk ave. 



Somerville ave. Northerly 
Highland ave. Lexington ave. 
Chester st. Day st. 

Berkeley st. Oxford st. 
Mt. Vernon st. Westerly 
North st. 
Medford st. 



Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 



Highland path, Morrison ave. 

east 
Highland path, Morrison ave. 

west 



40 
40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
35 
40 
20 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
40 
40 
30 
40 
20 
45 
40 
20 
20 
8 and 20 
40 
40 
40 
16 
40 
60 
10 



fHighland rd. 
Hill 

Hillsdale rd. 
Hillside ave. 
Hillside cir. 
Hillside pk. 
Hinckley 
Hodgdon pi. 
Holland 
Holt's ave. 
Holyoke road 
Homer sq. 
Horace 
Houghton 
Howard 
Howe 
Hudson 
Hunting 

Ibbetson 
Illinois ave. 
Indiana ave. 
Irving 
Trvington rd. 

l^aloo 

James 
Jaques 
Jaques 
Jaques 
Jasper pi. 
Jasper 
-Jay 



Morrison ave. 

Broadway 

Conwell ave. 

Pearl st. 

Craigie st. 

Walnut st. 

Broadway 

Dane ave. 

Davis sq. 

Oak st. 

Elm st. around to Elm st 

Bonner ave. Northwesterly 

South st. 

Springfield st. 

Thorndike st. 

Marshall st. 

Central st. 

South st. 



Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 
Davis sq. Public. 

Arlington Br. Private 

R. R. 
Arlington Br. Private. 10 

R. R. 
Boston ave. Pub. 30(70wide) 
Fairmount ave. Public. 40 

Sunset rd. Public. 40 

Southwesterly Private. 30 
Westerly Private. 16 

Northwesterly Public. 40 

B. & L. R. R. 
Northeasterly 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 



560 

267 

1,349 

376 

*469 
347 

183 

"465 
316 

'644* 



717 
339 
807 
330 

1,043 
754 
569 



290 
337 



679 
9,135 



Public. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 
Fitchburg R. R. Public. 
Cambridge line Public. 
Gorham street Public. 
School st. Public. 

Cedar st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 



Public. 30 and 35 
Private, about 20 
60 
10 
40 
30+ 



Somerville ave. Lowell st. 



Penn. ave. 
Penn. ave. 
Broadway 
Medford line 

Park st. 



Broadway 
Broadway 
Holland st. 
Mystic Valley 

Pky. 
Beacon st. 

Pearl st. 
Fellsway west Temple st. 

Temple st. Bond st. 

Bond st. Edgar ave. 

Walnut st. Easterly 

Pearl st. Gilman st. 

Holland st. Howard st. 



Pdblic. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 

Public. 



Radcliffe road Public. 



30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 

40 
40 
40 
40 

40 

40 
40 



1,499 
284 
632 



196 
1,081 

2',696 

'637 
200 
517 
653 
431 
445 
2,760 
117 

802 

427 

384 

1,180 



685 
320 



Public. 


40 


1.182 


Public. 


45 


1,005 


Public. 


40 


395 


Private. 


20 




Public. 


40 


283 


Public. 


40 


534 



252 



10C 



248 

210 
200 



120 



250 
161 



230 
149 



107 

108 



150 
151 



150 

ioo 



484 



80 



tRoadway (only) accepted 30 feet 'wide, full width of street 70 feet 



CITY ENGINEER 



361 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 




Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Jerome ct. 


Sycamore st. 


Jerome st. 


Private. 


10 


.... 


150 


Jerome 


Montrose st. 


Jerome ct. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


125 


Jerome 


Lawrence rd. 


Mystic Val. py Private. 


40 




495 


Joseph 


Newton st. 


Lincoln pky 


Public. 


40 


'458 




Josephine ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Broadway 


Public. 


45 


1,718 




Joy- 
Joy St. pi. 


Washington st. 


Poplar st. 


Public. 


30 


1,121 




Joy st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


16 





168 


Kenneson road 


Broadway 


Walnut road 


Private. 


30 


.... 


338 


Kensington av 


Broadway 


Blakeley ave. 


Public. 


40 


455 




Kensington av 


Blakeley ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


LIE 


Kent ct. 


Kent st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


about 25 




420 


Kent 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R, Public. 


40 


292 


. . . 


Kent 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


25 


386 




Kenwood 


College ave. 


Billingham st. 


Public. 


40 


322 


... 


Kidder ave. 


College ave. 


Boston ave. 


Public. 


40 


2,554 




Kilby 


Somerville ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


180 


Kilsyth road 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




S 


Kimball 


Lowell st. 


Craigie St. 


Private. 


40 


.... 


303 


Kingman road 


Washington st. 


Fitchburg R. R 


Private. 


25 




400 


Kingston 


Meacham road 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


647 


... 


Knapp 


School st. 


Granite st. 


Public. 


40 


379 


... 


Knowlton 


Tufts st. 


N'E* line Est. 87 Public. 


40 


461 


. . . 


Knowlton 


End of above 


Oliver st. 


Private. 


40 





464 


Lake 


Hawkins st. 


Church st. 


Public. 


40 


840 




Lamson ct. 


Linwood st. 


Poplar st. 


Private. 


20 




370 


Landers 


School st. 


Westerly 


Public. 


40 


228 




Langmaid ave. 


Broadway 


Heath st. 


Public. 


30 


353 


. . . 


Latin way- 


Professors row 


Talbot ave. 


Private. 


60 




250 


Laurel ave. 


Laurel st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 




125 


Laurel 


Somerville ave 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


'983 




Laurel ter. 


Laurel st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


23 


.... 


266 


Lawrence road 


Medford line 


Mystic Val. py Private. 


40 


.... 


585 


Lawson ter. 


Putnam st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


5 


.... 


200 


Lee 


Medford st. 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


385 




Leland 


Washington st. 


Dane ave. 


Public. 


40 


359 


• • • 


Leon 


Concord ave. 


Dickinson st. 


Public. 


40 


155 




Leonard pi. 


Joy st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


13 + 




*98 


Leonard 


Broadway 


Pow. House Bd.Public. 


40 


450 


... 


Lesley ave. 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave 


. Public. 


40 


333 




Lester ter. 


Meacham road 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


i90 


Lewis 


Magnus ave. 


Dead end 


Public. 


40 


416 


» • • . 


Lexington ave. 


Willow ave. 


Hancock st. 


Public. 


50 


624 


• ■ • 


Lexington ave. 


Hancock st. 


Angle 


Public. 


45 to 40 


147 


• > » 


Lexington ave. 


Angle 


Cedar st. 


Public. 


40 


578 


• • • 


Liberty ave. 


Broadway 


Appleton st. 


Public. 


40 


1,493 


• • • 


Liberty rd. 


Morrison ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Private. 


16 


.... 


200 


Lincoln ave. 


Lincoln st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


30 


478 


• ■ • 


Lincoln pky 


Washington st. 


Perry st. 


Public. 


40 


1,520 




Lincoln pi. 


Lincoln ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


9 


.... 


i20 


Lincoln 


Broadway 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


550 


• • • 


Linden ave. 


Elm st. 


Cedar ave. 


Public. 


45 


1.413 




Linden circle 


Linden ave. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


24 


.... 


i20 


Linden pi. 


Linden ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




160 


Linden 


Somerville ave. 


Charlestown st 


. Public. 


33 


587 




Line 


Washington st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


33 


1.727 


. • • 


Linehan ct. 


Linwood st. 


Chestnut st. 


Private. 


about 15 




200 


Linwood pi. 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


about 12 




150 


Linwood 


Washington st Fitchburg st. 


Public. 


50 


2*.ii4 


• . . 


London 


Linwood st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


40 


. • . . 


340 


Loring 


Somerville ave. 


Osgood st. 


Public. 


40 


413 




Louisburg pi. 


Autumn st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


13 


.... 


90 


Lovell 


Broadway 


Electric ave. 


Public. 


40 


385 




Lowden ave. 


Broadway 


Foskett st. 


Public. 


40 


1,247 


. . . 


Lowell 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


36 


1,259 


. . . 


Lowell 


Summer st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


3,472 


. . . 


Lowell circle 


Lowell st. 


Westerly 


Priv. 11 and 27.5 


.... 


148 


Lowell ter. 


Lowell st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


150 



362 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and' 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Madison 
Magnus ave. 
Magnus ave. 
Main 

Maine ave. 
Maine ter. 
Mallet 
Malloy ct. 
Malvern ave. 
Mansfield 
Maple ave. 
Maple pi. 
Maple 

Mardel circle 
Marion 
Marshall 
Mason 
May pi. 
McCarroll ct. 
McGregor ave. 

Meacham road 

Meacham 

Meacham st. ex 

Mead 

Mead 

Medford 

Medford 

Melville road 

Melvin 

Merriam a/ye. 

Merriam 

Merriam 

Michigan ave. 

Middelsex ave. 

Milk pi. 

Miller 

Milton 

Miner 

Minnesota ave. 

Mondamin ct. 

Monmouth 

Monmouth 

Montgomery av 

Montrose ct. 

Montrose 

Moore 

Moreland 

Morgan 

Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave. 

Morrison pi. 

Morrison pi. 

Mortimer pi. 

Morton 

Mossland 

Mountain ave. 

Mousal pi. 

Mt. Pleasant ct, 

Mt. Pleasant 

•Mt. Vernon av, 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Munroe 

Munroe 

Murdock 

Murray 

Museum 

♦Proposed. 



From 

School st. 
Washington st. 
Lewis st. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Maine ave. 
Willow ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Cameron ave. 
Somerville ave. 
School st. 
Marshall st. 
Poplar st. 
Spring st. 
Concord ave. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Hawkins st. 
Clyde st. 
Wiggles worth 

st. 
Dover st. 
Edgar ave. 
.Edgar ave. 
Moore st. 
End of above 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Ten Hills rd. 
Broadway 
Merriam st. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Sacramento st 
Orchard st. 
Vernon st. 
Broadway 
Ivaloo st. 
Central st. 
End of above 
, Broadway 
Montrose st. 
School st. 
Holland st. 
Main st. 
Beacon st. 
Cedar st. 
Willow ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Marshall st. 
Glen st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. 
No. Union st. 
Perkins st. 
Broadway 
Meacham st. 
Washington st. 
Pearl st. 
Perkins st. 
Walnut st. 
End of above 
Cedar st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 





Public 


Width 


Length 


To 


or 


in 








Private 


Feet Public Private 


Sycamore St. 


Public. 


40 


891 


. • • • 


Lewis st. 


Public. 


40 


42y 


. . . . 


Southerly 


Private. 


40 




80 


Medford line 


Public. 


50 


966 


. . . . 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


379 


. . . • 


Southeasterly 


I'uoiic. 


32 


205 


• • • • 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


657 


. . . . 


Merriam ave. 


Private. 


30 


.... 


255 


Yorktown st. 


Public. 


40 


410 


. . . . 


Washington st 


Public. 


40 


735 


• • • • 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


40 


3iy 




Maple ave. 


Private. 


5 


.... 


125 


Medford St. 


Public. 


30 


699 


. . . . 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


8 


.... 


14t 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


1.141 


. . . . 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


1.650 


. . . . 


Pow. House Bd. Public. 


40 


681 


. . • • 


Easterly 


Private. 


12 


.... 


1M 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


26 


.... 


71 


Walnut st. 


Private. 


13 





S02 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1,060 





Medford line 


Public. 


40 


777 


. . . . 


Northeasterly 


Private 


40 




242 


N'r Cameron a\ 


Public. 


40 


345 




Cameron ave 


Private 


40 




"95 


Central st. 


Public. 


50 


8.047 


. . . . 


Broadway 


Public. 


55 


1,985 


. . . . 


Shore Drive 


Private 


40 




281 


Bonair St. 


Public. 


40 


487 


• • • • 


Malloy ct. 


Private. 


15 




255 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


40 


*360 


.... 


Charlestown st 


Public. 


30 


510 


. . . . 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


470 


. . . . 


Fellsway 


Public. 


80 


2,304 





^'cuth westerly 


Private. 


about 3C 


) 


lou 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


30-33 466 


• • • • 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


223 


.... 


Ames st. 


Public. 


40 


244 


.... 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


525 


.... 


Harrison st. 


Private. 


25 




250 


Westerly 


Public. 


40 


'267 


.... 


Harvard st. 


Private. 


35 




200 


Wellington ave 


Public. 


40 


*265 


.... 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


12 




110 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


*886 


.... 


Mead st. 


Public. 


40 


695 


.... 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,471 


.... 


Park st. 


Public. 


40 


377 


.... 


Willow ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,366 


. . . . 


College ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,690 


. . . . 


Northerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


190 


Easterly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


175 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




172 


Knowlton st. 


Public. 


40 


287 


.... 


Elm st. 


Public. 


40 


377 


.... 


•ir Linden ave 


Public. 


22 


280 


.... 


B. & M. R. R. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 


.... 


260 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


33 


584 


. . . . 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


50 


.... 


764 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


600 


. . . . 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


50 


473 


. . . . 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


590 


. • . . 


Easterly 


Public. 


40 


375 


. . . . 


Boston st. 


Public. 


50 


1,214 


• . . . 


Clyde st. 


Public. 


30 


853 


.... 


Southerly 


Public. 


30 


190 


• ••• 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


164 


. . . . 



CITY ENGINEER 



:m 



table Showing the Location, Length and Width 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



of Public and 



Street 

Myrtle ct. 
Myrtle pi. 
Myrtle 
Mystic ave. 
Mystic ave. 

ttMystic ave. 

Mystic 

t Mystic Valley 
Parkway 

Nashua 
Nevada ave. 
Newberne 
Newberne 

Newbury park 

Newbury 

N. Hampshire 

ave. 
Newman pi. 
Newton pi. 
Newton 
Newton 
Norfolk 
North 

North 

North Union 
Norton 
Norwood ave. 

Oak Circle 

Oak 

Oak 

Oak St. pi. 

Oak ter. 

Oakland ave. 

Olive ave. 

Olive sq. 

Oliver 

Orchard 

Osgood 

Ossipee road 

Otis 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Packard ave. 

Packard ave. 

Palmer ave. 

Park ave. 

Park pi. 

Park pi. 

Park 

Parkdale 

Parker pi. 

Parker 

Partridge ave. 

Patten ct. 

Paulina 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl St. pi. 

Pearl ter. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 

Private 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Myrtle st. Easterly 

Myrtle st. Westerly 

Washington st Perkins st. 

Charlest'n line Union st. 

Union st. West Line Con-Public. 

necticut ave. 
West line Medford line Public. 

Connecticut Av. 

Benedict st. Mystic ave. Public. 

Medford line Arlington line Public. 



10 

20+ 
40 
60 

60 



1,423 
378 

1,762 



66 5,166 



Richardson st. 
Village st. 
Appleton st. 
Morrison ave. 

Newbury st. 
Holland st. 

Mystic ave. 
Cedar st. 
Newton st. 
Prospect st. 
Webster ave. 
Webster ave. 
Broadway 

Medford line 

b. 17 
Mystic ave. 
Nashua st. 
Broadway 

Cambridge line 
Prospect st. 
Angle 
Oak st. 
Elm st. 
Marshall st. 
Linden ave. 
Lake st. 
Franklin st. 
Cambridge line 
Granite et. 
Mason st. 
Cross st. 
School st. 
Beacon st. 



B. & L. R. R. 
Hanson st. 
Morrison ave. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Southeasterly 
Cambridge line 

Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
Easterly 
Webster ave. 
Concord sq. 
Cambridge line 
Medford line 

b. 17 
Medford line 

b. 18 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Medford st. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 
Private. 
Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 



40 
60 



35 
20 
40 

40 
55 
40 



336 
2,530 



637 

200 



1,260 

406 



40 

15 

about 10 

25 470 

40+ 637 
40 283 



40 

37 to 42 
30 
20 
40 



1,961 

649 

*350 



Northerly Private. 

Angle Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 
Northerly Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
School st. Public. 

Peterson ter. Private. 
Southerly Private. 

Cross st. Public. 

Aieaeham road Public. 
E'ly & w'ly Private. 
Curtis st. Public. 

Wigglesworth stPublic. 
Central st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 



665 
563 



440 



30 
40 
30 
4 
10 + 
40 

25 

about 15 

40 1,085 
40 1,567 

40 

40 1,375 
40 1,200 
35 1,361 
50 100 



Broadway Professors row 

Professors row Medford line 



Northwesterly 
Wallace st. 
Easterly 
Northeasterly 



Franklin st 
College ave. 
Laurel st. 
Park pi. 

Somerville ave. Beacon st. 
Washington st. Lewis st. 
Porter st. Northwesterly 

Washington st. Fremont ave. 
Vernon st. Broadway 

Cutter st. Southeasterly 

Broadway Holland st. 

Crescent st. Mt. Vernon st. 

st. 



Mt. Vernon st. Franklin 
Franklin st. Cross st. 

Cross st. Medford st. 

Pearl st. Northeasterly 

Pearl st. Northerly 

ttState Highway West line Connecticut Av 
^Metropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



Public. 60 

Private. 60 

Private. 20 

Public. 40 

Private. 30 

Private. 20 

Public. 50 

Public. 40 

Private. 20 

Public. 35 

Public. 40 

Private. 8 

Public. 40 

Public. 37 

Public. 50 

Public. 40 

Public 50 

Public. 20 

Private. 23 
e. to Medford 



1,758 



467 



1.238 

500 

*203 
1,467 

'769 

341 

957 

1,060 

2,447 

166 

line. 



100 
120 



200 



17S 
68 



100 
100 



600 
200 



35 



85 
90 

155 
100 



450 



240 
200 

522 

120 



150 



100 



161 



364 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



of Public and 



Street 

Pearson ave. 
Pearson road 
Pembroke ct. 
Pembroke 
Penn. ave. 
Penn. ave. 
Perkins pi. 
Perkins 
Perry 

Peterson ter. 
Philips pi. 
Pinckney pi. 
Pinckney 
Piper ave. 
Pitman 
Pitman 
Pleasant ave. 
Poplar ct. 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Porter ave. 
Porter 
Porter 

Powder House 
boulevard 



From 

Morrison ave. 
Broadway 
Pembroke st. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Wisconsin ave. 
Perkins st. 
Franklin st. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Spring st. 
Pinckney st. 
Washington st. 
Cedar st. 
Beech st. 
Spring st. 
Walnut st. 
Poplar st. 
Somerville ave. 
Linwood st. 
Joy st. 
Porter st. 
Elm st. 

Mountain ave. 
Powder House 
square 



Pow. House ter. Kidder ave. 
Prentiss Beacon st. 

Prescott Summer st. 

Preston road School st. 
Prichard ave. Morrison ave. 
Princeton Alpine st. 

♦Princeton Lowell st. 

Professors row College ave. 
Proposed Fellsway 

Proposed Fellsway 

Proposed Fellsway 

Prospect Washington St. 

Prosp't Hill av. Medford st. 
Prosp't Hill pkyMunroe st. 
Prospect pi. Prospect st. 

Puritan rd. Fellsway 

Putnam rd. Ten Hills rd. 

Putnam Summer st. 



To 

Boston ave. 
Dearborn road 
Southwesterly 
Sycamore st. 
Wisconsin ave. 
Cross st. 
Northeasterly 
Charlest'n line 
Lincoln pkway 
Olive ave. 
Westerly 
Southeasterly 
Perkins st. 
Westerly 
Spring st. 
Belmont st. 
Vinal ave. 
Southeasterly 
Linwood st. 
Joy st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northwesterly 
Mountain ave. 
Highland ave. 
Alewife Brook 

Parkway 
Liberty ave. 
Cambridge line 
Highland ave. 
Summer st. 
Boston ave. 
Lowell st. 
Centre st. 
Curtis st. 
Middlesex ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Cambridge line 
Munroe st. 
Stone ave. 
Newton st. 
Shore Drive 
Shore Drive 
Highland ave. 



Quincy 



Somerville ave. Summer st. 



Public 

or 
Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



45 
40 
25 
40 
50 
40 
20 
40 
40 
7.5 
15 + 
24 
40 
20 
30 
26 
40 
10 
30 
35 
35 
20 
45 
40 

80 
40 
35 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
50 

40 



1,320 
1,713 

'430 

1,112 

350 

1,336 

606 



1,186 
377 
543 

*35i 

315 



1,622 
415 

4,560 
585 

l'.iio 

839 

1,191 

648 

2*666 



2,071 
597 
400 



1,262 
781 



130 

200 

i.55 
100 
125 

"'i 

390 
'80 



65 
220 



150 



540 

i% 

315 
340 



130 

1,246 
1,131 



Radcliffe road 
Rad cliff e road 
Randolph pi. 
Raymond a.ve. 
Record ct. 
Reed's ct. 
Remick ct. 
Rhode Is. ave. 
Richardson 
Richardson ter. 
Richdale ave. 
Roberts 
Robinson 
Rogers ave. 
Roland 
Rose 
Roseland 
Rossmore 
Royce pi. 
Rush 
Russell rd. 

* Proposed 



Walnut st. 
Bradley st. 
Cross st. 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Oliver st. 
Cutter st. 
Mystic ave. 
Lowell st. 
Richardson st. 
School st. 
Hinckley st. 
Central st. 
Morrison ave. 
Waverly st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Somerville ave. 
Bonair st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 



Bradley st. Public. 35 
Marshall st. Public. 40 
Westerly Private. 15 
North st. Public. 40 
Southwesterly Private. 10 
Southwesterly Private. 20 
Southeasterly Private. 10 
Penn. ave. Public. 40 
Hinckley st. Public. 35 
Northeasterly Private. 20 
Sycamore st. Public. 40 
Northwesterly Private. 20 
Bartlett St. Public. 40 
Boston ave. Public. 45 
Boston line Private. 40 
Lewis st. Public. 40 
Cambridge line Public. 40 
Washington st. Public. 40 
Northeasterly Private. 15-f- 
Flint st. Public. 40 
N. line Hamil- 
ton rd. Public. 40 



392 

261 

345 



460 
467 

*875 

582 
1,682 

*450 
121 
534 

l',400 

559 



244 

iio 

71 
100 



135 

170 

ioo 

175 



CITY ENGINEER 



365 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 



Private Streets.- 



Street 

Russell rd. 

Russell 

Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Sanborn ave. 
Sanborn ct. 
Sargent ave. 
Sartwell ave. 
Sawyer ave. 
School 
School 
Sellon pi. 
Seven Pines av. 
Sewall ct. 
Sewall 
Shawmut 
Shedd 

Sherman ct. 
Shore Drive 
Sibley ct. 
Sibley pi. 
Silvey place 
Simpson ave. 
Skehan 
Skehan 
Skilton 
Smith ave. 
Snow ter. 
Spmerville ave. 
Sbmerville ave. 
South 

Spencer ave. 
Spring 
Springfield 
Spring Hill ter. 
Stanford ter. 
Steeves circle 
Sterling st. 
Stickney ave. 
St. James ave. 
St. James ave. 

ext. 
Stone ave. 
Stone ave. 
Stone pi. 
Strathmore rd. 
Summer 
Summit ave. 
Summit 

Sunnyside ave, 
Sunset rd. 
Sycamore 
Sycamore 
Sycamore 
Sydney 

Talbot ave. 
♦Tannery Ex. 

Taunton 
Taunton 
Taylor pi. 
Taylor 
Teele ave. 
Temple rd. 
♦Proposed. 



From 

N. Line Ham- 
ilton rd. 
Elm st. 



To 



-Continued. 

Public 
or 

Private 



Width Length 
in 

Feet Public Private 



Northerly Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 



Somerville ave. Fitchburg R. R. Public. 
Fitchburg R. R. Beacon st. Public. 

Beacon st. Cambridge line Public. 



Warren ave. Walnut st. 
Washington st. Northwesterly 



Broadway 
Cedar st. 
Packard ave. 



Walnut st. 
Cherry st. 
Curtis st. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



Somerville ave. Highland ave. Public. 



Highland ave. 

Marsnall st. 

Cameron ave. 

Sewall st. 

Grant st. 

Washington st. 

Somerville ave. Merriam St 

Sargent ave. Marshall st 



Broadway Public. 

Northwesterly Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Southwesterly Private. 
Temple st. 
Cross st. 



Mystic ave. 
Cutter st. 
Cutter st. 
Craigie st. 
Broadway 
Dane st. 
Hanson st. 



Fellsway 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Lowell st. 
Holland st. 
Hanson st. 
Durham st. 



Pearl st. around to Pearl st. 



Beacon st. 
Jaques st. 
E. Camb. line. 
Union sq. 
Medford st. 
Cedar st. 



Line st. 
Southwesterly 
Union sq. 
N. Camb. line 
Water st. 
Hancock st. 



Somerville ave. Summer st. 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private 

Private. 

Private. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



Concord ave. 
Highland ave. 
Beacon st. 
Cherry st. 
North st. 
Marshall st. 
Elm st. 
Summer st. 

Union sq. 
Columbus ave. 
Stone ave. 
Broadway 
Bow st. 
Walnut st. 
College ave. 
Walnut st. 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Grant st. 



Cambridge line Public. 
Belmont st. Public. 

Northeasterly Private. 
Easterly Private. 

Alewife Brk PkyPubhc. 
School st. Public. 

Summer st. Public. 

Northeasterly Public. 

Columbus ave. Public. 
Prosp't Hill py. Public. 
Southeasterly Public. 
Medford line Private. 
Elm st. Public. 

Vinal ave. Public. 

Billingham st. Public. 



40 
40 

40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
35 
40 
40 
50 
12 
40 
25 
40 
40 
40 
10 
40 
10 
10 
23 + -25 
40 
30 
30 
40 

25-f- 
16 
75 
70 
30 
40 
40 
40 
20 
20 
15 
40 
40 
40 
30 

40 
38 
30 
40 
45 
45 
40 



700 

80 
290 
154 

280 

1,075 

427 

i',9oi 

2,500 
"92 

615 

575 



1,018 
306 



4,325 

6,793 

989 

727 

1,220 

788 

673 



813 
458 
488 
125 

676 

107 
142 

7*, 900 
532 
262 



Wigglesworth stPublic. 25 to 35 306 



Packard ave. 
Cambridge line 

Wyatt. st. 
Angle 

Somerville ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Packard ave. 
Mystic ave. 



Hillsdale road 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Highland ave. 
Temple st. 

College ave. 
Woodstock st. 

(Ext'n) 
East'y to angle 
Marion st. 
Southerly 
Sydney st. 
Curtis st. 
Shore Drive 



Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private 



40 
45 
40 
35 
40 

50 

40 
30 
20 
15 
40 
40 
40 



656 
1,275 
667 
722 
679 



309 
685 



75 



176 

690 

i20 
i90 



310 
250 
2,081 
100 
100 
264 



414 
540 
200 
120 



200 
120 



16 



1,409 

160 

170 

95 

200 



1,420 



30G 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Temple 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


66 


1,637 


• • • ■ 


Ten Hills rd. 


Puritan rd. 


Shore Drive 


Private 


40 




1,431 


Tenney ct. 


Mystic ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


400 


Tennyson 


Forster st. 


Pembroke st. 


Public. 


40 


922 


.... 


Thorndike 


Holland st. 


Kingston st 


Public. 


40 


580 




Thorndike 


Underpass 


B. & M. R. R 
Arlington Br. 


Public. 


20 


88 




Thorpe. 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


30 


468 


.... 


Thurston 


Broadway 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


1.660 


.... 


Timmins pi. 


Dane st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


3.5 


.... 


97 


Tower ct. 


Tyler st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


.... 


150 


Tower 


Crown st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


559 


.... 


Tremont pi. 


Tremont st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


about 10 


.... 


75 


Tremont 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


589 


.... 


Trull 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


1,050 




Trull lane 


Highland ave. 


Oxford st. 


Private. 


15 


.... 


'266 


Tufts parkway College ave. 


College ave. 


Public. 


22 


900 


.... 


Tufts 


Washington st 


Cross st. 


Public. 


40 


982 


.... 


Turner ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Tyler 


Vine st. 


Dane st. 


Public. 


40 


'404 





Union 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


345 




Union pi. 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


ioo 


Upland Park 


Main st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


175 


Upland road 


Curtis st. 


Hillsdale road 


Private. 


40 





655 


Vermont ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


433 




Vernon 


Central st. 


Glenwood road 


Public. 


40 


764 


.... 


Vernon 


Glenwood road 


Partridge ave. 


Public. 


40 to 30 


190 


.... 


Vernon 


Partridge ave. 


Lowell st. 


Public. 


30 


434 


.... 


Victoria 


Broadway 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1.036 




Villa ave. 


Winslow ave. 


Arlington Br. 








• 






R. R. 


Private. 


35 


• • • • 


200 


Tillage 


Dane st. 


Vine st. 


Private. 


25 


• • . • 


370 


Vinal ave. 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,425 




Vinal 


Richardson st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


'266 


Vine ct. 


Vine st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


25 




140 


Vine 


Somerville ave 


Fitchburg R. R.Public. 


40 


540 




Vine 


Fitchburg R. R 


Hanson st. 


Private. 


40 


.... 


222 


Vine 


Hanson st. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


30 


662 


.... 


Virginia 


Aldrich st. 


Jasper st. 


Public. 


40 


405 





Wade ct. 


Cedar st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 




180 


Waldo ave. 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


'277 




Waldo 


Highland ave. 


Hudson st. 


Public. 


40 


287 




Walker 


Broadway 


Leonard st. 


Public. 


40 


713 




Wallace 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1.342 




Walnut 


Bow st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


3,948 




Walnut road 


Walnut st. 


Kenneson road 


Public. 


40 


270 




Walter terrace 


Walter st. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


222 




Walter 


Walnut st. 


about 100 ft N. 














of Bradley st. 


Public. 


40 


548 




Ward 


Medford st. 


Harding st. 


Public. 


30 


433 




Ware 


Curtis st. 


Russell rd. 


Public. 


40 


749 




Warner 


Pow. House sq 


Medford line 


Public. 


60 


500 




Warren ave. 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


663 




Warren 


Medford st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 to 40 


109 




Warwick place Warwick st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 




150 


Warwick 


Cedar st. 


Warwick pi. 


Public. 


40 


665 


• • • • 


Wnshington av 


Washington st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


18 


• • • • 


350 


Washington pi 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


about 7.E 




114 


Washington 


Charlest'n line 


Franklin ave. 


Public. 


75 


1,066 


• • • • 


Washington 


Franklin ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. Public. 


60 to 100 


3,977 


• • ♦ . 


Washington 


Fitchburg R. R 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


60 


2,344 


.... 


Washington ter.Washington st. 


Northerly 


Private 


30-40 




218 


Washington ter.End of above 


Westerly and 


Private 


40 




269 






Easterly 










Water 


South st. 


Northerly 


Public. 


25 


366 


• • • • 


Waterhouse 


Broadway 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


987 


.... 



CITY ENGINEER 



oG7 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Concluded. 



Public 
Street From To or 

Private 
Fairmount ave. Public. 
st. Roland st. Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 
Cross st. Public. 

Montgomery av Public. 
Private. 



"Watson Broadway 

Waverly Washington 

Webster ave. Union sq. 

Webster Franklin st. 

Wellington ave. Walnut st. 

Wellington ave. Montgomery av. Easterly 

Wesley pk. Wesley sq. Northeasterly 

Wesley Pearl st. Otis st. 

West Hawthorne st. Highland ave 

West Highland ave. Arlington Br 



Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



West Adams 
Westminster 
Weston ave. 
West Quincy 



Conwell ave. 
Broadway 
Clarendon ave. 
Bailey st. 



Westwood road Central st 



Wheatland 

Wheeler 

Whipple 

fWhite 

White St. 

Whitfield 

Whitman 

Wigglesworth 

William 

William 

Williams ct. 

Willoughby 

Willow ave. 

Willow pi. 

Wilson ave. 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windom 

Windsor road 

Windsor 

Windsor 

Winslow ave. 

Winter 



Winter Hill clr. Broadway 
Winthrop ave. Mystic ave 
Wisconsin ave. Broadway 



Woodbine 
Woodbine Ex. 
Woods ave. 
Woodstock 
•Woodstock 

(Extension) 
Wyatt circle 
Wyatt 

Torktown 
Torktown 

Court 
Court 
Court 

Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
-Court 

•Proposed. 
tSidewalk 



R. R. Private. 

Medford line Public. 

Electric ave. Public. 

Broadway Private. 

Medford line Public. 

Benton road Public. 

Mystic ave. Public. 

Mt. Vernon st. Public. 

Arlington Br. 
R. R. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Southeasterly Private. 

Curtis st. 

Packard ave. 

Bonair st. 

Chandler st. 

Medford line 

Northwesterly 

Sycamore st. 

Broadway 
line South st. 

B. & L. R. R. 

Hinckley st. 

Medford line 

Summer st. 

Hancock st. 
Cambridge Line Northerly 
End of above Fitchburg R. R. 

Clifton st. 

Hol'and st. 

Northeasterly 

Middlesex ave. Private. 

Penn. ave. Public. 

Westerly Private. 

LowpII <5t Private. 

Alewife Brk Pkypublic. 

Alewife brook Public! 

Tannery st. 

(Ext'n.) Private. 

Wyatt st. around to Wyatt st. Private. 
Concord ave. Lincoln pkway Public 



Broadway 
Pinckney st. 
Highland ave. 



Elm st. 
pi. White st. 
road Packard ave. 

Mason st. 

Pearl st. 

College ave. 

Broadway 

Porter st. 

Central st. 

Elm st. 

Cambridge 

Broadway 

Lowell st. 

Broadway 

Elm st. 

Willow ave 



College ave. 
College ave. 



Private. 



Public. 

Public 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



Centre st. 
End of above 
North st. 
Victoria st. 
Victoria st. 



Cambridge line 

Malvern ave. 

N. E. line 



N. E. line 
Malvern ave. 

Northerly 



39 Adams st. Southeasterly 
Albion st. Central st. 

11 Albion st. Northeasterly 
21 Albion st. Northeasterly 
292 Broadway Southwesterly 
612 Broadway Southwesterly 
Buena Vista rd.Easterly 
Cambria st. Northerly 

12 Carlton st. Southeasterly 

112 Central st. Northwesterly 

113 Central st. Southeasterly 

in Somerville. 



Public. 
Private. 

Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 

35 

49.5 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

30 



20 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
30 
40 
50 
25 
20 
35 
40 
40 
40 
40 
27 
40 
30 
25 
40 
50 
30 
35 
40 
40 to 

40 

20 
40 



40 
40 

8 
12 

9 
10 
15 
20 
15 

9 
25 
10 
20 



236 

1,955 

1,034 
215 

*405 
515 

192 



710 
376 

*292 

489 

1,364 

269 



307 

*687 

632 

744 

381 



427 
3,534 
125 
307 
470 

'366 

575 

40 

490 

1.123 

402 



499 



1,149 
32 403 



496 



294 



200 
"85 

266 

525 



318 
200 



50 

154 



65 



177 
583 

461 

212 



920 
315 



100 

90 
216 

178 

100 

90 

188 

145 

59 

75 

168 

150 



;G8 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 



227 Columbia st.Northwesterly 



Windsor st. ex, 
Westerly- 
Easterly 
Southwesterly 



Conlon ct. 
36 Craigie St. 
58 Dane st. 
20 Dimick st. 
91 Franklin st. Westerly 
35 Lexington ave Northerly 
66 Lowell st. Westerly 
101 Medford st. Easterly 
335 Somervilleav Northerly 
10 Stone ave. Northwesterly 
Windsor st. ex. E'ly and W'ly 
Washington ave Franklin st. 
Irvington rd. Boston ave. 
Total 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



10 

20 

25 

10 

39.25 

12 

21 

25 

8 
15 
20 
20 

6 
20 



461 



680 



117 

240 
126 

70 
136 
171 

90 
101 

75 

60 
113 
370 

95 

157 

76,432 



Public, 87.437 miles [includes 1.406 miles of City Boulevard and Park 
Roadways, 2.331 miles of State Boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), 
and 0.97 miles State Highway]; private 14.475. 



Total length of streets in the city, 101.91 miles. 



STREET COMMISSIONER 



369 



REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER 



Office of the Street Commissioner, 

City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1926. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Alderman : — 

Gentlemen : — I most respectfully submit the fiftieth an- 
nual report, containing a brief summary of the principal 
work performed by the Highway Department, by day labor 
and contract, during the year 1925 with recommendations 
for necessary additions the coming year. 

This department has charge of the construction, alter- 
ation, repair, maintenance and management of ways, streets, 
sidewalks and bridges ; the setting out and care of shade trees ; 
the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths, elm leaf 
beetles and other pests which destroy trees; and the oiling 
and watering of streets. 

Highway Department Appropriations 



Highway Maintenance 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Street Sprinkling 
Street Cleaning . 
Suppression of Moths 
Care of Trees 
New Streets 
Permanent Pavement 
Sidewalks Construction 
Reconstruction and Resurfacing 









Appropriations 


Expenditures 


$115,986 


03 


$115,315 


45 








10,300 


00 


10,297 


90 








37,600 


00 


37,401 


90 








25,055 


00 


25,052 


75 








4,800 


00 


4,748 


47 








5,500 


00 


5,467 


97 








55,026 


79 


54,318 


72 








221,687 


75 


200,586 


11 








16,676 


63 


16,471 


35 


facing 




33,003 


01 


32,451 


57 




$525,632 


21 


$502,112 


19 



Somerville has not receded from its policy of road 
improvements. The good accomplished, the dividends occur- 
ing, the benefits conferred are so apparent that this city ia 
spurred on to greater efforts. 

Our people are demanding roads that will meet the traffic 
requirements of today, roads that will bear the shock of great 
loads at high speed, roads over which motor vehicles can 
operate with economy, roads over which all kinds of highway 
traffic can operate regardless of weather or season, roads that 
will render a profit instead of creating a deficit. 



Oi 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



The coming spring the new Northern Arteryway, con- 
necting the North and South Shores, will be started and al- 
though Somerville will lose a considerable amount of taxable 
property it will be a great improvement in caring for the 
traffic that passes through our city. 



1925 
Highway Maintenance 



Appropriations 


. 




$82,292 


08 


Credits 


* 




33,693 


95 




115,986 


03 


Street Commissioner .... 


$3,300 


00 






Bookkeeper, Clerk, Foreman 


5,182 


11 






Office Expenses 


629 


09 






Equipment and Repairs 


4,432 


56 






Harnesses 


1,403 


09 






Tools and Machinery .... 


3,836 


45 






Steam rollers 


573 


58 






New Automobiles 


1,042 


14 






Tractor and Automobile maintenance 


7,732 


34 






Stable Expenses 


6,740 


50 






Hay, grain and feed .... 


6,515 


19 






Shoeing and veterinary 


1,830 


90 






Fuel 


442 


48 






Miscellaneous 


354 


89 






Repairs to streets, gutters etc. 


16,467 


07 






Repairs subways 


484 


13 






Care of lanterns and traffic signs . 


5,164 


81 








7,474 


69 








1,716 


28 






Care of Highway Property 


1,249 


87 






Sawing wood 


291 


14 






Holidays and vacations .... 


8,137 


33 






Charges to other departments 


17,736 


79 






Bills receivable 


12,273 


02 








305 


00 








670 


58 


$115,986 


03 


■ 
Snow and Ice 











The benefit of snow removal is valuable to trade and in- 
dustry by having the highways open to motor vehicles one 
hundred per cent of the year. There is hardly an item of 
household comsumption that is not transported, at some point 
in its distribution, by motor truck. The doctor, ambulance, 
mail, police and fire departments depend on motor driven 
vehicles. 

Another motor driven plough has been added to the 
department this year. 



STREET COMMISSIONER 371 

This department cares for the sidewalks around all pub- 
lic buildings and grounds. 

257 requests and reports were attended to. 

$8,531.14 was expended for the removal of Snow and 
Ice. 2989 cubic yards of snow and ice were removed. 93 J4 
cubic yards of sand and 147 cubic yards of ashes were used 
in caring for icy sidewalks, streets and crossings. 

Bridges 

The bridges are in good condition. The painting of the 
iron fences, under the care of the Highway Department was 
completed this year. Some of the railroad bridges should be 
widened to conform with the width of the roads approaching 
the same. 

Street Railways 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company reconstructed 
double tracks on Somerville avenue from near Granite street 
on the north side and near Park street on the south side to 
Wilson square, and on Mystic avenue from the Boston line 
to near Austin street. 

The double tracks on Broadway from Teele sqare to the 
Arlington line and on Highland avenue should be recon- 
structed. 

They also removed the double tracks on Medford street 
and Pearl street from Broadway to Cross street. 

Underground Wires 

Permits were issued to the Edison Electric Illuminat- 
ing Company to open streets for the construction or enlarging 
of conduits on School street from Highland avenue to Medford 
street and on Medford and Pearl streets to their terminal 
poles on intersecting streets and services; on Broadway from 
Walnut street to School street for the new White Way, the 
new lights were turned on by Mayor Webster and in honor 
of this event the merchants, in this district, had a parade and 
band concert. 

To the New England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany for enlarging conduits on Pearl street from Marshall 
street to their office at Bradley street and for underground 
connections and services on Medford and Pearl streets. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company removed their 
trolley poles and wires on Medford and Pearl streets. 



372 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Crushed Stone 



20 tons of crushed stone were purchased from William 
J. Sullivan Company at their quarry for $1.75 per ton, and 
5485 cubic yards for $2.80 per cubic yard delivered on the 
line of work. 136 tons of pea stone at $1.75 per ton and 
221 tons No. 2 stone at $1.50 per ton were purchased from 
Coleman Brothers at their quarry and 47 tons at $2.95 per 
ton were delivered on the line of work. 108 tons of crushed 
stone were purchased from Rowe Contracting Co. at $2.30 
per ton. 

Sidewalks Maintenace 

Money spent for repairing sidewalks is well invested. 

4956 linear feet of edgestone were reset. 2525 square 
yards of brick sidewalks were relaid and 244 square yards 
of granolithic relaid. 3298 square yards of granolithic were 
substituted for old brick sidewalks. This- ,'kind of work 
should be continued. 

Police reports pertaining to all kinds of defective side- 
walks are charged to this appropriation. 

$10,297.90 was expended for Sidewalks Maintenance. 

Street Sprinkling 

All the tar used under this account was applied by the 
department's employees and equipment. Cold tar was de- 
livered into storage tanks situated in the city stables yard 
by the Trimount Oil Company at $.097 per gallon. 

The American Car Sprinkler Company sprinkled and 
flushed our main streets where there are car tracks for $975.00 
a month, seven days a week. 

Dust layers used during the year : — 

182,615 gallons of Tarco B, Trimount Oil Company. 

5,000 gallons Non-Asphaltic Oil, Trimount Oil Company. 
30,000 pounds Calcium Chloride. 

$37,401.90 was expended for Street Sprinkling. 

Street Cleaning 

Very few complaints were received in regard to dirty 
streets. The two motor pick-up sweeping machines were kept 
to work continually and in many instances two shifts of men 
were used, thus keeping the machines working day and night. 
There is also a night cleaning gang who cares for the squares. 

5250 cubic yards of street sweepings were removed. 

$25,052.75 was expended for Street Cleaning. 



STREET COMMISSIONER 373 

Suppression of Moths 

This department cares for all trees both public and pri- 
vate in regard to moths. 

8,329 street trees were inspected and cared for. 
14,912 private trees were inspected and cared for. 
22.831 bushes were found moth infested. 
13,061 fences and buildings on which moths nested. 
25,387 gypsy moth nests were painted with creosote. 

13 brown tail moth nests were gathered and destroyed. 
170 satin moth nests were painted with creosote. 
6,248 trees were sprayed by the gasoline spraying machine to 
exterminate the different kinds of caterpillars and beetles. 
34,939 tussock moth nests were destroyed. 

$4,748.47 was expended for the Suppression of Moths. 



Shade Trees 

Many dead and dangerous trees were removed during 
the year. 

66 trees were set out. 
217 trees were removed. 
269 trees were trimmed by request. 

91 tree guards and supports were installed. 

$5,467.97 was expended for the Care of Trees. 



374 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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STREET COMMISSIONER 377 

Highway Construction — New Streets 

Nine new streets were constructed during the year under 
the Betterment Act, by contract, viz : — 

Setting edgestones 70c per linear foot. 

Gutter construction $3.50 per square yard. 

Construction of Macadam roadway $1.65 per square yard. 

The city furnished the edgestone delivered on the line of work 

for $1.34 per linear foot and also the asphalt for 19c per gallon. 

Three new streets were constructed by City employees. 

Five new streets were accepted this year. 
154,318.72 was expended for New Streets. 

Sidewalks Construction 

The average cost of granolithic sidewalks constructed by 
department employees, including excavation and all materials 
was |3.46 per square yard, the abuttors paying half the cost 
of construction. 

Miles of edgestone, granolithic, brick and gravel side- 
walks in the city : — 

Edgestones 153.257 miles 

Gravel sidewalks 19.779 miles 

Brick sidewalks 70.056 miles 

Granolithic sidewalks .... 59.025 miles 

$16,471.35 was expended for Sidewalks Construction. 

Highway Construction — Permanent Pavement 

The city now has a fine thoroughfare on Medford and 
Pearl streets from Broadway to Cross street. The Boston 
Elevated Railway Company removed their double car tracks 
and a concrete base was constructed (the sides of these two 
streets already had concrete) the Warren Bros, then placed 
a Warrenite mixed top for a wearing surface from curb to 
curb. 

On the portion of Medford street known as Magoun 
square from Broadway to the easterly line of Norwood avenue, 
the old rails and the concrete on the sides were removed, a 
new concrete base was constructed with granite cut blocks 
and grouted with Portland Cement. The merchants on this 
section of the street were so pleased with the new construction 
they had a parade, band concert and block party to celebrate 
the completion of this paving. 

Middlesex avenue which had a strip of concrete twenty- 
four feet wide with gravel sides has been widened eight feet on 
the west and twenty-eight feet on the east side making a per- 
manent roadway sixty feet wide. This widening was con- 



-US ANNUAL REPORTS 

structed with concrete base, granite paving blocks grouted 
with Portland Cement and edgestones set on both sides. 
Ford's new plant will be situated on this throughfare. 

Mystic avenue from the Boston line to near Austin 
street has been repaved, a new concrete base and recut granite 
blocks were laid where needed. 

Prospect street from Webster avenue to the Boston and 
Maine Railroad bridge has been constructed with a concrete 
base and granite cut blocks grouted with Portland Cement. 

On Webster avenue from Columbia street to the Cam- 
bridge line the space between the car tracks (known as the 
dummy) was relaid with cut granite blocks grouted with 
Portland Cement. 

On Somerville avenue the north side from Granite street 
and the south side from near Park street to Wilson square 
the old granite blocks were removed, recut and laid on a new 
concrete base grouted with Portland Cement. 

|200,586.11 was expended for Permanent Pavement. 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing 

Five streets were reconstructed or resurfaced this year 
at an average cost of $1.75 per square yard by city employees. 
By reconstructing a few side streets each year the city will 
keep the streets in first class condition. 

$32,451.57 was expended for Reconstruction and Resur- 
facing. 

Micellaneous 

165 Granolithic driveways constructed. 
Ill Brick driveways constructed. 
61 Edgestones dropped for driveways. 

4 Driveways extended. 

3 Driveways discontinued. 

Driveways are constructed, discontinued, relocated or 
extended at the expense of the petitioners. 

Two horses were killed on account of disability. 

Three horses were purchased during the year. 

The department maintains its own municipal repair shop 
for the different lines of work. 

I have attended meetings of the Public Works, Mayor 
Webster as Chairman, Public Works Committee and the Board 
of Aldermen for consultation regarding work and petitions. 



STREET COMMISSIONER 379 

Traffic Control 

The United States Department of Commerce reports for 
the fifty-three weeks period ending Jan. 2, 1926 that Somerville 
has had fewer fatalities than any other city of comparable 
size in the country except Norfolk, Va. The Highway De- 
partment maintains all the traffic signs, lanterns, lines and 
lights. The Police Department lights the lanterns at night. 
Several safety zones have been established. Traffic and dan- 
ger lines were painted on the streets. "Be Careful" signs 
were erected for the Somerville Safety Council. Line signs 
were erected at the bordering City and Town lines. 

Adequate space for highway traffic and effective regu- 
lations of its use by vehicles and pedestrians are among the 
most pressing present day municipal needs. 

The impossiblity of providing a traffic officer at every 
street corner has resulted in a rapidly increasing need for 
traffic signs, signals or lines of some kind. To relieve some of 
the dangerous situations there has been a gradual introduc- 
tion of one way streets. 



Permits 
There were during 1925 : — 

157 permits issued to the Cambridge and Charlestown Gas Com- 
panies. 
100 permits issued to cross sidewalks. 
584 permits issued to occupy streets and sidewalks. 
27 permits issued to feed horses. 
6 street sprinkling complaints and requests. 
153 notifications to other departments and corporations. 
57 accident reports. 
1008 police reports. 

849 brick and granolithic sidewalks repaired. 
1404 miscellaneous reports and requests. 
191 drain layers permits. 
821 water department openings. 
198 permits to open streets and sidewalks. 
96 danger and traffic signs erected. 
37 new signs erected. 
198 signs repainted. 
87 streets cleaned by request. 
4678 cubic yards of sand and gravel used. 
5778 cubic yards of dirt removed. 
937 cubic yards of ashes used. 
917 cubic yards of old macadam used. 
5620 bags of Portland cement used. 
6 cubic yards of loam used. 



•J30 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Recommendations 

I most respectfully recommend the repaying of Somer- 
ville avenue from Union square to Medford street and the 
granite blocks that would be left from this reconstruction 
work could be used to complete the northerly side of Beacon 
street from Buckingham street to Park street. That a new 
bituminous mixed top be laid on Broadway from Teele square 
to Arlington line and on Broadway south side from Edmands 
street to Boston line. On Prospect street from Webster ave- 
nue to Cambridge line the tar top should be stripped off the 
concrete base and recut granite paving blocks should be laid 
on the old base, grouted with Portland Cement. 

Portions of the brick paving in Davis square should be 
relaid. using granite cut blocks grouted. 

This department should have a fire proof garage. 

As Mayor Webster, whom I have served under for four 
years is to retire at the end of this year, I desire to express 
my appreciation for the co-operation and interest he has taken 
in this department. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to all for their sup- 
port and co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Asa B. Prichard, 

Street Commissioner. 



ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS 381 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC 
LINES AND LIGHTS 



Somerville, Mass. 

February 1, 1926. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — 



I most respectfully submit my seventeeth annual report 
as Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights for the year 
ending December 31, 1925. 



Inspection of Wiring in Buildings. 

Electrical installations have increased in number over 
last year and constant supervision must be maintained to see 
that the work is safe and up to standard requirements. 

Considerable defective work has been found most of which 
has been done by amateurs and unlicensed men who pose as 
electricians and such work is a menace to the whole district. 

The improper use of appliances, some of which have 
never been approved, have resulted in numerous fires. 

These appliances are found attached to lighting sockets 
on fixtures generally causing the protective fuses to blow out, 
and these are often replaced by improper ones introducing a 
fire hazard. 

Flat irons, washing machines, cooking and heating ap- 
liances require a separate circuit for each. 

Inspections are followed up as closely as possible and 
wiring as a whole shows some improvement. 

No work should be accepted or paid for until inspected 
and approved. 

One assistant inspector was appointed last year but an- 
other is needed to make periodical re-inspections of old work. 



382 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Number of notifications of new work 2960 

Number of inspections of new work 4817 

Number of re-inspections of new work 624 

Number of inspections of old work 40 

Number of defective installations of old work 10 

Number of defective installations remedied 10 

Number of re-inspections of old work 10 

Total number of inspections 5491 

Number of permits issued to the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Co. for installing meters, lamps, 

etc 7480 



Fire Alarm System 

The Fire Alarm System is in excellent condition but some 
of the older apparatus should be replaced. 

Several new boxes will be required in the newly develop- 
ed parts of the City. 

358 bell alarms have been received and transmitted dur- 
ing the year. 

782 telephone calls for fire were received and fire depart- 
ment sent. 

2 A. D. T. alarms were received and transmitted. 



The central office equipment consists of the following 

2 — 6 circuit operating boards. 

1 — 5 circuit tapper board. 

1 — 5 circuit gong board. 

2 — 16 circuit storage battery charging boards. 

1 — 32 circuit protector board. 

1 — 12 circuit automatic repeater. 

1 — dial 4 number manual transmitter. 

2 — 5 circuit punching registers. 

13 punching registers and take up reels. 

2 automatic time and date stamps. 

1 master clock. 

950 cells storage battery. 

5 — 10 foot 4 shelf battery racks. 

4 metropolitan tappers and 2 gongs. 



The apparatus outside the central office consists of the 
following : — 

136 signal boxes. 

7 tower strikers 
45 gongs. 

10 punching registers. 
20 tappers. 

8 private telephones. 



ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS 383 

About 63 miles of overhead wires and 81 miles of under- 
ground wires. One new box has been installed No. 724 Mystic 
Valley Parkway and Irvington Road. 

8500 feet of overhead wire has been run and 20,400 feet 
of old wire removed. 

2,400 feet of underground cable was installed. 

Police Signal System 

The police Signal System is now about 13 years old and 
some of the apparatus will have to be replacel constant re- 
pairs being necessary to keep it working. 

Some trouble has been found with signal boxes but ser- 
vice has not often been interrupted. 

A number of boxes have been overhauled and parts re- 
placed. 

A new register and time stamp for the signal desk is 
necessary at once as old ones are beyond repair. 

New batteries will be needed and desk overhauled. 

The system consists of the following : — 

1 — 4 circuit police desk. 

About 19 miles of overhead wire. 

3 special boxes. 

59 street signal boxes. 

About 15 miles of underground cable. 

Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets 

The same attention has been given to the condition of 
poles and wires on the streets as in previous years. A number 
of defective poles have been replaced by the companies own- 
ing same. 

New poles have been placed in locations granted for the 
purpose of supplying lighting and telephone service and aban- 
doned poles have been removed. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co 

Boston Elevated Railway Company 

Postal Telegraph Company 

Permits given to the New England Tel. 
& Tel. Co. for attachments to the 
Edison Company's poles 50 

Permits given to the Edison Electric 
111. Co. for attachments to the New 
England Tel. & Tel. Company's poles 54 



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5 


57 




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66 


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9 


5 
2 



384 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Street Lighting 



A number of new lights have been added and some have 
been changed. The lights on Medford Street from Gilman 
Square to Magoun Square have been changed from 600 O. P. 
to 1000 C. P. and mounted on underground posts and the en- 
tire street has been cleared of overhead wires. 

The new "White Way" on Broadway, Winter Hill is 
a great improvement in the lighting of that district. 

The number of street lights January 1, 1926 are as fol- 
lows : — 

214 — Magnetite lights. 
22— 1000 C. P.. lights. 
378— 600 C. P. lights. 
133— 125 C. P. lights. 
991— 60 C. P. lights. 



Recommendation 

I respectfully recommend that another assistant inspec- 
tor be employed to enable the department to more thoroughly 
cover all new and old installations of electrical wiring in 
the City. This is imperative as with the increase of new elect- 
rical inspections required in the City, old work cannot be pro- 
perly checked up. 

Conclusion 

I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members of 
the Board of Aldermen and the several departments for the 
many courtesies received. 

Respectfully yours, 

Walter I. Fuller, 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 



WATER DEPARTMENT : . 385 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 



SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX CO, MASSACHUSETTS 

Settled, when part of Charlestown, 1630 

(Home of Colonial Governor John Winthrop) 

Incorporated a town, 1842 

Established a city, 1872 



Location: Somerville City Hall (near centre of the city) is 2% miles 
northerly from State House, in Boston. 

Greatest extent of the City north and south about 4.2 miles. 
Greatest extent of the City east and west about 2.1 miles. 
Elevation Highland avenue at City Hall 105 feet above mean low 
water. 

Lowest building elevation in the city 13 feet 

Highest building elevation in the city 145 feet 

Area of city, including land and water, about 4.22 square miles 

Land, 2,461.50 acres; water and marsh, 238.50 acres 

Population, 1920 census, 93,033 

Present population, estimated, 100,000 

Entire population on line of pipe and supplied with water 



Water works owned by City of Somerville 

Construction commenced in 1868 

Source of supply: Metropolitan system, taking water of the Nashua 

river at Clinton, Mass. 

Range of pressure on street mains: 

Low service 35 to 65 pounds 

High service 45 to 100 pounds 



Mayor 
Hon. John M. Webster 



Water Commissioner 
Frank E. Merrill 



Office of the Water Department 
Room 10, City Hall 



Department Buildings and Yard 

Cedar street, near Broadway 



386 ANNUAL REPORTS 



ADMINISTRATION OF WATER WORKS 
VESTED AS FOLLOWS: 



1868-1871 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER COMMITTEE (5) 

Acts 1868; Chap. 202 



1872 — 1890 
SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (5) 
Acts 1871; Chap. 182 



1891 — 1897 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (3) 

Acts 1890; Chap. 218 



1898 — 1899 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS (3) 

Acts 1898; Chap. 33 



1900 — 

WATER COMMISSIONER (1) 

Acts 1899; Chap. 240 



WATER DEPARTMENT 387 

REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 

January, 1926. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1925, this being the fifty-first annual report of the 
water department and my twenty-fifth as water commissioner: 

Revenue and Expidentures 
Water bills have been issued as follows : — 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to $7,244 50 

"Additional" water charges, amounting to 1,741 81 

"Metered" water charges, amounting to 279,380 71 



$288,367 02 
Adjustments 1,165 21 



Income from sale of water $287,201 81 

Receipts; water service assessments $12,417 97 

Receipts; labor and materials sold: — 

Misc. accounts charged 8,185 46 

Adjustments 843 66 7,341 80 



19,759 77 



Total income of water works $306,961 58 

This amount was used as follows : — 
For water works purposes : — 

Under Control of the Water Commissioner 

Water Works Maintenance $69,943 10 

Water Works Extension 53,408 69 

Miscellaneous accounts: 

Maintenance $7,341 80 

Extension 47 39 7,389 19 

$130,740 98 



Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner 

Metropolitan water works assessment .... $138,498 07 

Maintenance water works buildings 1,828 91 

$140,326 98 

For other municipal purposes : — 

Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner 

Surplus $35,893 62 



Total $306,961 58 



388 ANNUAL REPORTS 

In addition to the appropriations from water income to 
other municipal purposes enumerated above, water has been 
furnished without charge to all the city departments that 
have required its use and it is paid for out of the income 
from sale of water. 



Department Receipts and Disbursements 

WATER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT 

Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen $81,000 00 

Department accounts; receipts 1,179 55 

Water works extension account; receipts 34,936 72 

Amount expended for labor and materials for 
operation, maintenance, and renewal of 
the water works $69,943 10 

Amount expended for materials used in ex- 
tension of the water works 34,936 72 

Miscellaneous accounts 7,341 80 

Labor and materials furnished municipal de- 
partments 1,179 55 

Extension Account; amount refunded 47 39 

Transferred to other accounts by Board of 

Aldermen 3,635 00 

Balance 32 71 

$117,116 27 $117,116 27 



WATER WORKS EXTENSION ACCOUNT 

Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen.... $54,000 00 

Water Maintenance account: refunds 348 45 

Amounts paid Water Maintenance Account.... 47 39 

Service for Public Building 301 06 

Amount expended for labor and materials 

used in extension of the water works.... 53,408 69 
Balance 591 31 

$54,348 45 $54,348 45 



Cost of Water Works 

The total cost of water works on December 
31, 1924, as represented by the expendi- 
tures from appropriations for water 
works extension was $1,187,641 73 

Expended during the year 1925, on extension 

account $ 53,408 69 



Total expenditures, December 31, 1925.... $1,241,050 42 



WATER DEPARTMENT 389 

Water Works Income from 1898 and its Distribution 

The water income and its distribution from 1898 to 1925, 
inclusive, is shown in the following table : — 
Total water income $6,869,460 83 

Distribution: — 

Water Works Account 

Water works Construction, Renewal, 
Maintenance, Operation and Miscel- 
laneous Accounts $1,895,290 80 

Water bonds 274,000 00 

Interest 86,575 00 

Metropolitan Water Assessments 2,825,935 66 

Maintenance Water Works buildings 16,584 63 

$5,098,386 09 

Other Municipal Accounts 

Various municipal departments through 
specific appropriations and general 
revenue account $1,771,074 74 

$6,869,460 83 

Water Distribution System — Construction 
STREET MAINS 

Approximate number of feet of street mains in the 

city, January 1, 1925. (including hydrant 

branches and blow-offs) ^. 555,296 

Feet of street mains laid in 1925 8,338 

Feet of hydrant branches laid in 1925 190 

Feet of blow-off branches laid in 1925 26 

Total feet of pipe laid 8,554 

Feet of pipe removed or replaced 334 

Net increase in feet of pipe 8,220 

Total approximate feet of pipe in the city 563,516 

Total pipe mileage, approximately 106.72 



The sizes and lengths of pipe laid and discontinued are 
as follows : 





Feet 


Feet 




Feet 


Feet 


Size 


Laid 


Discontinued 


Size 


Laid 


Discontinued 


%" 








6" 


1,215 





1" 


108 


51 


8" 


596 





1%" 





44 


10" 


2,994 


24 


2" 


149 


215 


12" 


2,926 





4" 


113 





16" 


66 











20" 


387 






390 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



The pipes constructed and replaced during the year are 
as follows : — 



Bailey Road 

Century Street 

Century Street , 

Chapel Court 

Chapel Court 

Crown Street 

Edgar Court 

Edgar Terrace 

Penwick Street 

Gov. Winthrop Rd 

Middlesex Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue 

Middlesex Fells Parkway 

Mystic Avenue 

Powder House Blvd 

Powder House Blvd 

Powder House Blvd 

Powder House Blvd 

Puritan Road 

Putnam Road 

Silvey Place 

Ten Hills Road 

Ten Hills Farm Dev 

Washington Terrace 

Weston Avenue 

Hydrant branches and 
blow-offs 







Feet 


Size 






Discon- 


Discon 


Size 


Feet Laid 


tinued 


tinued 


10" 


893 






8" 


316 






4" 


87 






2" 


149 






1" 


108 






6" 


241 






6" 


165 






6" 


165 






6" 


161 


166 


2" 


10" 


756 






20" 


387 






16" 


18 






12" 


769 






12" 


319 






12" 


966 


24 


10" 


10" 


12 


49 


2" 






44 


1%" 






51 


1" 


10" 


716 






10" 


617 






8" 


277 






12" 


872 






16" 


48 






6" 


212 






6" 


84 
216 







8,554 



334 



Hydrants, Gates, etc. 



Number of fire hydrants in city January 1, 

1925 

Number set during year 

Number removed during the year 

Net increase in number of hydrants 

Total number of public fire hyydrants .... 
Number of private fire hydrants, January 1, 

1925 

Number added 

Total number of private fire hydrants 
receiving their supply from the city 
mains 



38 
20 



1,213 



18 



1,231 



66 




66 



WATER DEPARTMENT 391 

Number of gates in city, January 1, 1925 .... 2,060 

Number set during the year for streets 24 

Number of section gates set 10 

Number set on hydrant branches 48 

Number set on blow-off branches 3 

Number set on check-valve connections 1 

86 

Number of street gates removed 1 

Number of section gates removed 

Number of waterpost gates removed 3 

Number of street sprinkler gates removed .... 2 



Net increase in number of gates 80 

Total number of gates in city 2,140 

Number of check-vales in city January 1, 1925 8 

Number added during the year 1 

Total number of check-valves 9> 

Number of blow-offs in city January 1, 1925 190 

Number added during the year 3 

Total number of blow-offs 19$ 

Number of waterposts in city January 1, 1925 65 

Number removed during the year 3 

Total number of waterposts 62 

Number of drinking fountains in city & 

Number of car-sprinkler connections Janu- 
ary 1 17 

Number removed during year 2 

Number now in city 15 

Water Service Connections 

Interpreting "Water Services" to mean service 
connections in use on live supplies it ap- 
pears from a study of old records, elim- 
ination of old service connections through 
combination with other supplies, 
abandonment of old service connections, 
etc., that the number of services actually 
in use in the city on January 1, 1925 
was 13,516 

The number of new service connections 

brought into use during the year was 189 

The number of old service connections re- 
stored to use 75 

264 
The number of service connections shut off 
during the year for permanent or tem- 
porary non-use of water was 166 



392 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Increase in number of services in actual use 

The total number of services in use on 
December 31, 1925, was approximate- 
ly 

These services, under state law, are all re- 
quired to be metered. 

In addition to the above there are fire sup- 
plies for sprinkler systems, which are 
not at present required to be metered, 
to the number of 

The number of new service connections in- 
stalled during the year was 251 but not 
all of these are yet in use, or "alive." 

The number of feet of pipe laid in making 
these connections was 9,062. 



98 



13,614 



62 



Size, number and length of services installed in 1925 :- 



%"— 220— 7837' 
2 "— 5— 215' 



1"— 13— 370' 
4"— 2—293' 



1%"— 4— 66' 
6 "—7—281' 



Number of fire supplies installed during 1925 
(Included in above) 

Location of Fire Supplies 

Linwood St., No. 161; Ernest P. Robitaille, 
Public Garage 

Beacon St., No. 266; Albert S. Walsh, Pub- 
lic Garage 

Meacham Road; Isadore Meyer, Public Gar- 
age 

Summer St., No. 364; Francis R. Henderson, 
Garage and Stores 

Highland Ave., No. 186; Little Sisters of 
Poor, Institution 

Broadway cor. Glen St., M. Peraner & Sons, 
Garage and Stores 

Highland Ave., No. 391; M. Peraner & Sons, 
Garage and Stores 



7 
No. 



Size 

6" 
6" 
6" 
6" 

6" 
6" 
6" 



Water Meters 

Number of water meters in city, January 1, 1925 

Number installed during the year, new 

Number reset 



dumber removed on account of permanent or tem- 
porary discontinuance of water and for substi- 
tution of other meters 

Net increase in number of operating meters 



Total number of meters in service ... 

Number of motor registers (included in above) 
Per cent, of services metered 



285 
186 

471 



277 



13,012 



194 



13,206 

2 

97.7 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



393 



Operating Meters December 31, 1925 



Size %" %" i" iy 2 » 2" 3" 
No. 12742 283 107 20 30 13 
Motor and elevator registers 



6" 
1 




13,206 



The meters installed in 1925 were classed as follows : — 

Applications of property owners 1 , 

New services 189 

General installation 95 

Reset 186 

Total 471 



Meters were removed for the following causes 

Vacancies and temporary non-use of water 

Services permanently discontinued (1 motor register) 
Replaced by other meters 

Total 



122 

44 

111 



277 



Meters installed yearly on old and new services under the 

State Compulsory Meterage law, which requires complete 
meterage of city by the year 1928 : — 

Average installation Meters Set in excess Meters 

required on set on of Total set on 

old services old services requirements excess new services 

1908 411 755 344 344 147 

1909 411 637 226 570 201 

1910 411 501 90 660 169 

1911 411 528 117 777 200 

1912 411 423 12 789 236 

1913 411 432 21 810 255 

1914 411 422 11 821 231 

1915 411 439 28 849 217 

1916 411 434 23 872 203 

1917 411 163 248f 624 154 

1918 411 82 329t 295 39 

1919 411 166 245t 50 23 

1920 411 115 296f 246f 45 

1921 411 663 252 6 60 

1922 411 67 344f 338t 181 

1923 411 430 19 319f 244 

1924 411 811 400 81 163 

1925 411 96 315t 234| 189 

t Deficiency. 

NOTE: — Meter connections were installed in 1925 for the years full 

quota but setting the meters in place lapped over the end of the year 
and the figures will appear in the report for 1926. 



394 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



The following table shows the progress of meter installa- 
tion in Somerville by years and the results therefrom in water 
consumption : — 



Popu- 

Year lation 

1897 58,000 

1898 59,000 

1899 61,000 

1900 62,000 

1901 64,000 

1902 66,000 

1903 68,000 

1904 69,000 

1905 70,000 

1906 71,000 

1907 72,000 

1908 74,000 

1909 76,000 

1910 78,000 

1911 79,000 

1912 80,000 

1913 82,000 

1914 85,000 

1915 87,000 

1916 90,000 

1917 91,000 

1918 91,000 

1919 92,000 

1920 93,033 

1921 95,000 

1922 96,000 

1923 ; 98,000 

1924 100,000 

1925 100,000 

♦Resurvey 







Per Capita 


dumber 


Number 




Con- 


of 


of 


Per Cent 


sump- 


Services 


Meters 


Metered 


tion 


9,601 






(Est.) 88 


9,806 


143 


1.5 


88 


10,052 


226 


2.25 


88 


10,291 


202 


2 


88 


10,520 


224 


2 


88 


10,710 


269 


2.5 


88 


10,854 


647 


6 


88 


11,059 


1,272 


11.5 


Met. 89 


11,279 


2,092 


18.5 


89 


11,489 


2,829 


24.5 


89 


11,662 


3,455 


29.5 


90 


11,817 


4,333 


36.5 


89 


12,018 


5,155 


43 


84 


12,149 


5,817 


48 


80 


12,357 


6,533 


53 


74 


12,596 


7,171 


57 


79 


12,827 


7,856 


61 


72 


13,034 


8,499 


65 


73 


13,233 


9,155 


69 


67 


13,420 


9,763 


72.75 


69 


13,509 


10,028 


74.23 


73 


13,514 


10,116 


74.86 


8t) 


13,544 


10,322 


76.21 


69 


13,554 


10,472 


77.26 


77 


13,631 


11,190 


82.11 


73 


13,844 


11,447 


82.68 


76 


14,045 


12,079 


86.0 


81 


14,189 


13,012 


90.6 


77 


13,614* 


13,206 


97.7 


80 



Summary of Pipes and Fixtures of the Water System 
December 31, 1925 



Feet of main pipe (approximately) 
Services in use (approximately) . 
Fire supplies (sprinkler systems) 

Public fire hydrants 

Private fire hydrants 

Gates 

Check Valves 

Meters 

Motor registers 

Waterposts 

Car-sprinkler connections 

Blow-offs 

Drinking fountains and troughs 



563,502 

13,614 

62 

1,231 

66 

2,142 

9 

13,206 

2 

62 

15 

193 

8 



WATER DEPARTMENT 395- 

WATER ASSESSMENTS AND CONSUMPTION 

The assessment paid to the Commonwealth by this city 
as its proportionate part of the cost and operation of the 
Metropolitan Water Works for the year 1925 was as fol- 
lows : — 

Sinking Fund 9,494 07 

Maintenance 39,301 10 

Interest 80,534 66 

Maturing Bonds 4,686 40 

Brookline Credit 4,481 84 



Total payment for 1925 138,498 07 

The amount paid by this city since the beginning in 
1898 is as follows : — 

Sinking Fund 431,646 32 

Maintenance 614,168 24 

Interest 1,682,650 71 

Maturing Bonds 29,073 54 

Miscellaneous 68,396 85 

Total payments to date 2,825,935 66 

There has been credited to the city by the Commonwealth 
as its proportion of the amounts received from entrance fees, 
water supplied outside the district and water furnished to 
water companies, the sum of $9,056.10. 

The daily consumption of water in Somerville, as re- 
corded by the Venturi meters, operated by the Metropolitan 
water works, is shown below by months for the year 1925 : — 

Gallons Gallons Gallons Gallons 

Month per day per capita Month per day per capita 

January 8,163,200 83 July 8,423,700 85 

February 7,765,900 79 August 8,295,800 84 

March 7,449,300 75 September .... 8,282,600 83 

April 7,375,700 75 October 7,976,700 80 

May 7,590,800 77 November .... 7,653,800 77 

June 8,492,700 86 December .... 7,977,000 80 

The consumption for the year was : — 

Low-service 2,265,204,000 gallons 

High-service system 638,555,000 gallons 

Total consumption 2,903,759,000 gallons 

Average daily consumption 7,955,500 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Som- 
erville 80 gallons 

Average daily consumption per capita, for Met- 
ropolitan district 99 gallons 



396- ANNUAL REPORTS 

The following table shows the daily per capita consump- 
tion of water in the cities and towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District for the year 1925, as registered by the Metro- 
politan meters. 

City or town Jan Fdb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Year 

Arlington 62 58 55 58 68 78 70 70 69 63 56 52 63 

Belmont 61 61 61 64 64 82 78 82 80 68 63 61 69 

Boston 124 118 112 111 109 118 116 115 116 115 112 117 115 

Chelsea 93 87 77 74 73 76 76 76 76 74 73 75 77 

Everett 127 134 119 128 126 132 130 126 127 118 118 122 126 

Lexington 59 61 57 56 61 73 71 71 69 62 63 58 63 

Maiden 63 59 58 57 53 56 55 57 61 57 56 56 57 

Medford 51 51 51 48 49 55 51 51 52 51 56 65 53 

Melrose 58 59 55 57 57 66 68 68 67 67 64 61 62 

Milton 47 45 46 47 49 52 46 46 47 48 46 45 47 

Nahant 53 51 50 65 97 184 219 215 161 80 58 58 108 

Quincy 71 71 70 70 69 81 81 80 78 73 77 74 75 

Revere 72 68 65 66 69 78 80 83 77 69 64 68 71 

Somerville 83 79 75 75 77 86 85 84 83 80 77 80 80 

Stoneham 66 64 58 56 60 66 64 66 68 64 63 65 63 

Swampscott 59 58 58 64 76 108 115 113 96 69 83 109 84 

Watertown 79 76 70 68 71 81 80 81 78 74 66 65 74 

Winthrop 57 56 55 55 57 71 80 86 73 59 57 59 64 

Met. Dist 104 100 95 94 93 102 101 100 100 98 96 99 99 

The district, in order of per capita consumption, begin- 
ning with the lowest, stands as follows for the year 1925 : 



Total 
Per Day 

Milton 604,000 

Medford 2,507,600 

Maiden 2,968,400 

Melrose 1,253,800 

Arlington 1,576,400 

Lexington 492,900 

Stoneham 574,000 

Winthrop 1,030,000 

Belmont 1,047,600 

Revere 2,377,900 

Watertown 1,887,500 

Quincy 4,478,200 

Chelsea 3,660,400 

Somerville 7,955,500 

Swampscott 753,900 

Nahant 176,000 

Boston 89,724,700 

Everett 5,281,000 

Total District 128,349,800 

♦Metropolitan District Commission Report for 1924. 

Operation — Maintenance — Construction 

The constantly increasing routine work of the depart- 
ment has kept our maintenance and operating forces busily 
engaged. 

Much building activity has taken place in the easterly 
part of the city through the acquisition of a large tract of 
land on Middlesex avenue by the Ford Motor Company for 



Per Capita 


Services 


Per Day 


Metered* 


47 


100 


53 


100 


57 


99.47 


62 


100 


63 


100 


63 


100 


63 


100 


64 


100 


69 


100 


71 


87.47 


74 


100 


75 


91.12 


77 


99.73 


80 


97.7 


84 


100 


108 


93.92 


115 


94.11 


126 


89.38 


99 


95.08 



WATER DEPARTMENT 397 

an assembling plant, and the development of the so-called 
Ten Hills Farm, a tract covering many acres which once con- 
tained the country residence of Colonial Governor John Win- 
throp. This "Farm" has now been laid out with streets and 
about 300 house lots upon which many residences have been 
erected during the year. Several thousand feet of street mains 
with service pipes, fire hydrants, controlling valves and blow- 
offs have been installed to meet present requirements of a 
water supply in these developments. 

Tracts of smaller area in other parts of the city have 
been developed residentially and all have received needful 
supplies of water. 

Important work in connecting dead ends of mains to 
improve the water circulation in the distribution system has 
been accomplished in Mystic Avenue, Crown Street and Pow- 
der House Boulevard. In the latter street an additional 
check-vaive was installed to automatically feed the high-ser- 
vice district from the low-service system in case of need 
through failure of the high-pressure mains to properly func- 
tion. 

251 new service pipes have been laid, showing an in- 
crease of 96 over the previous year. Meters or meter con- 
nections have been installed to meet all requirements of con- 
sumers and of the State laws. 

A summary of the streets in which water pipes were 
laid appears earlier in this report ; the lengthy detailed items 
of the work done which have in previous years appeared in 
these pages are now kept on reference file in the general office 
of the water department. 

As much as possible of the construction work of the 
year has been done by contract under supervision of the water 
commissioner. 

Northern Traffic Artery 

Much study has been given the proposed new traffic road 
which is to be built through Somerville by the Commonwealth 
in relation to its effect upon the water pipes now in use. 
Some changes will undoubtedly need to be made and prepara- 
tions for the same are under way. Service connections have 
already been cut off from more than forty dwelling houses 
that have been vacated and other work has been accomplished. 

Water Consumption 

The water consumption for the year has risen three 
points to an average of 80 gallons per capita daily and the 
receipts from sales of water have correspondingly increased. 



398 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Water Rate Collections 

The burden of collecting the water rates falls upon 
the water department. How well this is accomplished is 
shown by the following results, which gives the water com- 
missioner justifiable pride : — 

The table gives the number and amount of metered water 
bills rendered in each month of the year 1925. Each bill 
covers a period of three months use of water. 



Section Date of Number Amount to 

and Qr. Bills of Bills be Collected 

1-4 January 1 3826 $32,290 54 

2-1 February 1 4960 19,578 13 

3-1 March 1 4315 15,644 66 

1-1 April 1 3830 36,006 67 

2-2 May 1 4968 19,616 88 

3-2 June 1 4320 14,658 66 

1-2 July 1 3835 32,494 03 

2-3 August 1 4970 20,610 66 

3 3 September 1 4326 15,889 29 

1-3 October 1 3844 35,933 04 

2-4 November 1 5022 20,658 40 

3-4 December 1 4338 14,595 16 



At the time of going to press with this report these 
bills have all been paid, making the record of collections 100 
per cent. 

The above record is made possible largely through our 
method of closely following up delinquencies and the judicious 
use of the gate wrench. 

It has been found necessary to apply the provisions of 
the recently enacted Water Rate Lien Law in but one instance 
ana this bill was then promtly paid. 



Financial 

All bills against the department for the year have been 
paid, so far as known, and the books show a surplus ot 
receipts from departmental activities amounting to $35,893.62. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 399 

Acknowledgment 

The water commissioner appreciates the constructive 
nelp qf mayor, aldermen, business associates, employees and 
citizens who have cooperated with him in his work of carry- 
ing on this large and important public service of our city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Merrill, 

Water Commissioner. 



400 ANNUAL REPORTS 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1925 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association. 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 

SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 

General Statistics 

Population, census 1920, 93,033; present, estimated 100,000. 
Date of construction: Commenced in 1868. 
By whom owned: City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: Water is delivered into the city's mains, under 
looth high and low pressure, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Census population, 1920, 93,033. 

Population on lines of pipe, Dec. 31, 1925, 100,000. 

Population supplied, Dec. 31, 1925, 100,000. 

Total consumption for the year, 2,903,759,000 gallons. 

Average daily consumption, 7,955,500 gallons. 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 80. 

Statistics iRelating to Distributing System, 1925 

MAINS 

Kind of pipe, cast iron. 

Sizes, from 4-inch and under to 20-inch. 

Laid 8,554 feet; discontinued 334 feet; net extension, 8,220 feet. 

Total now in use, 106.7 miles. 

Number of hydrants added during year (public, 18, private, 0) 18. 

Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,297. 

Number of stop gates added during year, 80. 

Number of stop gates now in use, 2,140. 

Number of blow-offs, 193. 

Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES 

Kind of pipe: Lead; lead-lined wrought iron; cement-lined 
wrought iron; cast iron. 

Sizes, one-half to eight inches. 

Laid 9,062 feet. 

Number of service connections made, 251. 

Services in use, approximately, 13,614. 

Number of fire supplies (sprinkler systems), 62. 

Number of meters added, 471; meters and motor registers dis- 
continued, 277; net increase, 194. 

Number now in use, 13,206. 

Percentage of services metered, 97.7. 

Percentage of water receipts from metered service, 97. 

Number of motors and elevator registers added, 0; removed, 1. 

Number now in use, 2 (included in number of meters.) 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



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402 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF SANITARY DEPARTMENT 



February 18, 1926. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : 

The report of the Sanitary Department for the year 1925 
is respectfully submitted herewith. 

Collections of Ashes and Paper 



January- 
February 
March 
April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Ashes 


Paper 


(Cubic Yards) 


(Cubic Yards) 


17,881 


4,330 


14,187 


3,710 


13,565 


3,360 


12,333 


3,780 


9,987 


3,320 


9,264 


3,500 


9,750 


3,500 


10,060 


3,680 


9,207 


3,320 


10,268 


4,680 


11,608 


3,320 


13,098 


3,770 



141,208 44,270 



During the year the Sanitary Department paid to the 
Highway Department $2,661.91 for the use of teams and 
$1,357.00 for board of horses. 

The paper and combustible materials are being disposed 
of at the incinerator plant, the city receiving a revenue of 
$400. per year for the paper. The garbage is collected by 
contract, twice a week from May 15th to October 15th and 
once a week for the period from October 15th to the follow- 
ing May 15th. Ashes and non-combustible refuse are collect- 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT 403 

ed principally with automobile trucks on account of the dis- 
tance to the dumps used by the department which are located 
in Medford and subject to the rules and regulations of the 
Board of Health of the City of Medford. 

The Medford dumps are fast filling up and I recommend 
that Somerville take action as soon as possible to provide 
dumping facilities for its refuse. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edgar T. May hew, 

Supt. of Sanitary Dept. 



404 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF SOMERVILLE PLANNING BOARD 



December 31 , 1925. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen. 
Gentlemen : — 

As required by the provisions of Chapter 494 of the Acts 
of 1913 the Planning Board herewith submits its annual re- 
port, together with recommendations for the year 1926, as 
herein contained. 

Organization 

The Planning Board met and organized for the year 1925, 
the following members being present : John Williamson, 
George J. Kauh, Waldo D. Phelps and David J. Kelley. The 
Board elected John Williamson Chairman and David J. 
Kelley Secretary for the ensuing year. 

The Zoning of Somerville 

On April 28, 1923 the City of Somerville, through its 
Planning Board, employed the Technical Advisory Corpora- 
tion of New York to make a preliminary survey of the city 
to gather the necessary data for the purpose of later mak- 
ing a comprehensive city plan and zoning ordinance. The 
report of these expert city planners is contained in our report 
for that year. 

In 1924 the Planning Board again urged the City Govern- 
ment to appropriate sufficient funds to complete the work of 
zoning the city but no action was taken. 

It was therefore again requested by the Planning Board 
in its report for the year 1924 that it be given the necessary 
appropriation to carry out its recommendations for zoning 
the city. In the early part of 1925 the Board of Aldermen 
on the recommendation of Mayor John M. Webster approved 
an appropriation of $10,000 to do the work, but stipulated 



PLANNING BOARD 405 

that work of zoning should be done by the Planning Board 
working in conjunction with a special committee of the Board 
of Aldermen. As a result the Planning Board invited several 
different expert city planners to appear before the Board of 
Aldermen and the Planning Board to give their views and 
submit estimates of the cost of furnishing a complete zoning 
map and ordinance for Somerville. 

After hearing the different ideas expressed and the es- 
timates given, the Planning Board employed the Technical 
Advisory Corporation of New York to complete the work it 
had begun. 

The contract was signed on July 2, 1925, and work was 
immediately started, which finally resulted in the submission 
to the Planning Board of a comprehensive zoning ordinance 
and map dividing the city into six different use districts or 
zones. The ordinance and map were then presented to the 
Board of Aldemen and referred to its Legislative Committee 
for consideration. After numerous meetings of the Legisla- 
tive Committee and the Planning Board the ordinance was 
reported to the Board of Aldermen by Albert E. Hughes Chair- 
man of the Legislative Committee, in order that a public 
hearing could be arranged for and final action taken by the 
Board of Aldermen. 

At the public hearing it developed that most of the cit- 
izens appearing were in favor of the immediate enactment of 
the ordinance but there were some objectors who were later 
satisfied. The ordinance was finally passed by the unanimous 
vote of the 19 members of the Board of Aldermen who were 
present. A copy of the ordinance as finally passed with the 
zoning map is submitted with this report. 

Mayor John M. Webster, the Board of Aldermen of 1924 
and especially the hardworking Legislative Committee of the 
Board may well feel proud of this legislation which the Plan- 
ning Board is certain means so much for the future growth 
and welfare of our city, and the protection of the health, com- 
fort and property rights of its citizens. 

Recommendation for 1926 

There are two important matters that the Planning 
Board wishes again to call to the attention of the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen, namely: — 

1. The enactment of a new building code. 

2. A more equitable plan of assessing real estate. 



406 ANNUAL REPORTS 

With reference to the building code the Planning Board 
last March submitted a new building code to the Board of 
Aldermen which has yet to be acted upon and reported by the 
Legislative Committee. The Planning Board is aware that 
this ordinance should receive careful study but believes that 
it should be taken up by the new city government without 
further delay. It is very necessary that the building code 
should be enacted so that it will not conflict with some of the 
provisions of the zoning ordinance but no doubt the Legisla- 
tive Committee will have the zoning law in mind when con- 
sidering the building code. 

The other important recommendation as to the assess- 
ing of real estate has been approved by the Board of Alder- 
men but will require a much larger appropriation than was 
required for the zoning ordinance. 

The Planning Board believes that it is better to have 
this important matter done with great care even if the first 
expense seems great. 

The formation of a new system of assessing real estate 
will result in a fairer and more equal sharing in the bur- 
dens of government so that all land owners similarly situat- 
ed will be treated alike. All real estate will be assessed in ac- 
cordance with a definite rule or plan and not depend solely 
on the judgment of the assessors. It will also be of great 
assistance to the assessors in fulfilling their duty to the city 
and to all property owners. 

The Planning Board also submits the following recom- 
mendation for 1926 : 



1. The widening of the railroad bridge near Ball Square on Broad- 
way to relieve the present dangerous traffic conditions at that 
point. 

2. The further use and development of Saxon C. Foss Park 
formerly Somerville Park by providing a playground on that 
part adjoining Mystic Avenue and generally making the park 
more useful and attractive than at present. This could be 
done wtith very little expense to the city. The city engineer, 
Ernest W. Bailey, has a plan drafted which can be seen at 
any time. This plan shows more in detail what can be done 
to make this park the beauty spot of the city. 

3. The enlarging of the present fire districts to include all of 
Broadway; all of Holland Street; all of Elm Street to Som- 
erville Avenue, all of Somerville Avenue to Union Square; 
and Medford Street from Highland Avenue to Washington 
Street. 



PLANNING BOARD 407 



4. The widening of Highland Avenue by taking 30 inches off the 
sidewalk on each side of the street. This would mean moving 
the curbing and would not require the taking of any private 
property. This improvement would help to relieve traffic con- 
gestion on this main throughfare. 

5. The widening of the railroad bridge on Cross Street to re- 
lieve traffic conditions at that point. 



Mystic River Development 

The time is coming when the city will not have enough 
available dumping ground to take care of the ashes and refuse. 
Let us take steps now to save heavy expense later when it 
will be necessary to lighter the city refuse and ashes down 
Boston Harbor to be dumped into the ocean, the same as is 
now necessary in the City of Boston. A municipal wharf on 
the Mystic River west of the Wellington Bridge at some point 
between the Bridge and the Hinckley Rendering Company 
Plant would be an asset to the City of Somerville and certain- 
ly a great help in the further development of the River. 

The Planning Board again urges upon the city govern- 
ment the necessity of taking some land on the river front to 
be utilized as a wharf by the city, before any new buildings 
or other development has taken place which would increase the 
damages to be paid for the taking. 

Appropriations 

During the year 1925 the Planning Board expended and 
accounts for its appropriation as follows : — 

Zoning the oity $7,196 62 

Telephone 25 20 

Clerical Services 90 95 

Expense to Convention 58 00 

Printing and Advertising 42 00 

Other supplies 122 30 

Framing Plans 230 00 

7,765 07 
Balance returned to city Treasury 2,234 93 

Total $10,000 00 

For the year 1926 the Planning Board requests an ap- 
propriation of |35,000 in order that it may undertake the work 
of formulating a new system of assessing real estate and also 



408 ANNUAL REPORTS 

carry on its work as outlined in the recommendation con- 
tained in this report. In connection with the work necessary 
to insure a new system of assessing real estate the Planning 
Board requests the co-operation of the Board of Aldermen and 
the appointment of a special committee of said Board of Alder- 
men to work with the Planning Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Williamson, Chairman. 

Waldo D. Phelps. 

George J. Rauh. 

David J. Kelley, Secretary 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 409 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, 
Gentlemen : 

In compliance with the City Ordinance, I have the honor 
of submitting, for your information, the annual report of 
the fire department for the year ending December 31, 1925. 

Alarms and Losses 

Number of bell alarms 359 

Number of still alarms 830 

Total alarms 1,189 

Number less than 1924 17 

Value of buildings at risk $3,762,750 00 

Insurance on buildings 4,267,635 00 

Damage to buildings 259,880 41 

Value of contents 1,670,515 00 

Insurance on contents 594,365 00 

Damage to contents 148,861 06 

Total value at risk 4,862,000 00 

Total damage 408,741 47 

Approximate per capita loss 4 08 

Classification of Causes of Alarms 

Dump 151 

Bonfires 118 

Out of town 126 

Grass 65 

Spark on shingle roof 52 

Automobiles 51 

Electric wires and appliances 51 

Careless smoker 49 

Set by children 48 

Chimney fires 44 

Unnecessary 43 

Defective heaters 42 

False alarms 41 

Unknown 32 

Spontaneous ignition 28 

Overheated heaters 27 

Careless use of matches 23 

Children playing with matches 21 

Rubbish in the cellar 21 

Leaves and Christmas trees 13 

Miscellaneous 143 

1,189 



410 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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FIRE DEPARTMENT 411 

Manual Force 

The manual force consists of one hundred and nineteen 
(119) permanent men, during the year one has been retired 
and placed on the pension list, one has been added from 
eligible list of the Civil Service. 

The roster of the department is as follows, — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

1 Deputy Chief, 

2 District Chiefs, 
7 Captains, 

1 Master Mechanic, 
11 Lieutenants, 

2 Enginemen, 

94 Permanent men. 



Apparatus 

1 Motor driven, 1,300 gallon pumper and hose wagon, 

1 Motor driven, 900 gallon pumper and hose wagon, 

2 Motor driven, 750 gallon pumper, hose wagon and chemical. 
1 Tractor drawn, 800 gallon steam fire engine, 

5 Motor driven, combination hose and chemical wagons, 

1 Motor driven, combination ladder truck and chemical, 

2 Motor driven, tiller steering ladder trucks, 
1 Automobile, Chief's car, 

1 Automobile, Deputy Chiefs car, 

1 Automobile, District Chief's car, 

1 Automobile, Master Mechanic's car, 

1 Automobile, Service car, 

1 Automobile, hose wagon used for dump service. 

1 Motor driven, ladder truck, in reserve. 



Hose 

The amount of serviceable hose is 9,450 feet of two and 
one-half {2y 2 ) inch double jacket, rubber lined, water hose 
and 2,050 feet of three quarter inch chemical hose. There has 
been 1,500 feet of new two and one half inch purchased and 
1,950 condemned, also 300 feet of new chemical hose pur- 
chased and 400 feet condemned. At least 2,000 feet of new 
hose should be purchased the coming year. 



412 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Brief Resume 

The fire starting in the Columbia Bag Wood Co. on Sept- 
ember 3rd. amounted to 25% of the year's total loss: The 
losses by months were, 

January $11,499 17 

February 69,344 08 

March 14,001 99 

April 5,512 00 

May 77,443 33 

June 40,828 13 

July 7,989 00 

August 9,417 73 

September 104,001 56 

October 13,008 25 

November 17,546 28 

December 38,149 95 

$408,741 47 

Needless Causes of Alarms. Setting fires at the dump, 
bonfires, burning grass and false alarms, summoning the ap- 
paratus 436 times the past year, are malicious and unecessary, 
the calls of this character are increasing from year to year, 
some drastic steps should be taken to abate this abuse of 
of men and equipment ; the city has been lavish in the expendi- 
ture of money for the purchase of the best fire-fighting mach- 
ines and they should be preserved and protected for service 
at legitimate alarms. 

Chimney Fires and Overheated Heaters. Fires of this 
character are increasing; owing to the shortage of coal and 
the use of many substitutes together with the installation of 
oil burners constitute a grave menace if proper attention is 
not given to the cleaning of chimneys and heaters, fires should 
never be started until the soot and carbon have been removed, 
otherwise a dangerous fire is inevitable with the attendant 
loss of property and possibly life. 

Electric Appliances and Wires. The many labor sav- 
ing devices designed to be used in connection with electricity 
have been a prolific cause of starting many fires, this class 
of fires can and should be entirely eliminated by the exercise 
of proper care in disconnecting the current when not in use. 

Recommendations 

The increase in number of the 4, 5 and 6 storied apart- 
ment buildings demands the providing of a quick raising lad- 
der as an adequate means of prompt service for the saving of 
lives and property, to that end, I recommend the purchase 
of a seventy-five foot aerial truck. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 413 

As in my last report, I recommend the replacement 
of the tractor-drawn steam fire engine at the Central Station 
with a motor driven pump of at least 1,000 gallons capacity; 
at the time of the purchase of the steamer, thirteen years ago, 
it was similarly used througout the country, this type of 
pump has been replaced by the up-to-date, less expensive to 
operate and more efficient motor driven pump ; more than two- 
thirds of the fires are answered by the apparatus at the Cen- 
tral Station, therefore, the latest and best type of equipment 
should be provided. 

Again I recommend the abolition of the present quarters 
occupied by Engine Company No. 4 at the corner of Highland 
Avenue and Grove street and the erection, at a more suit- 
able place, of a building adequate for housing of the appara- 
tus and habitable for the men in the Davis Square section of 
the city. 

In Conclusion 

In concluding this report, I wish to express to His Honor, 
Mayor Webster and the members of the Board of Aldermen 
my appreciation for their consideration and co-operation in 
the welfare of the department. 

I commend the members of the department for their 
devotion to duty thereby assisting in maintaining its recog- 
nized high standing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sewall M. Rich 

Chief Engineer. 



414 ANNUAL REPORTS 



INDEX 



'City Auditor, Report of 3 

Balance Sheet 6 

Cash Statement 9 

Taxes — Special Assessments 10 

Departmental Bills 11 

Water Department Accounts 12 

Statement of Estimated Revenue 13 

Appropriations 16 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 25 

County of Middlesex 26 

Revenue and Expenses 26 

Temporary Loans 27 

Taxes 29 

Funded Debt 28, 31 

Maturities on Funded Debt 33, 34 

Interest Requirements on Funded Debt 32, 33, 34 

Borrowing Capacity 35 

Abatements, Refunds, State Income Tax, Etc 36, 37, 38 

Overlay Accounts 38, 39 

Excess and Deficiency Account 39 

Receipts and Expenditures, Classification of 40 

Schedule of Public Property 77 

City Clerk, Report of 318 

Receipts 318 

Payments 320 

Licenses and Permits 321 

Births 321 

Marriages 322 

Deaths 322 

Assessed Polls and Registered Voters 330 

Elections 327 

Liquor License Question 324 

Ordinances 325 

City Engineer, Report of 337 

Engineering Department 337 

City Engineer Division, Classification of Expenses 338 

Streets Accepted as Public Ways in 1925 340 

Table of Street Construction 343 

Sewer Division 347 

Sewers and Storm Drains Constructed 348 

Maintenance Account 349 

Parks and Playgrounds Division 351 

Maintenance Account 351 

Public and Private Streets 355 



INDEX 415 

City Government and Officers for 1925 331 

City Solicitor, Report of 296 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, Report of 80 

Revenue and Expense, Statement of 81 

Cash Statement 82, 83 

Taxes 89 

Street Sprinkling Assessments 9C 

Overlay and Abatement 91 

Supplementary Assessments 91 

Betterment Assessments 92 

Departmental Accounts 93 

Revenue Loans 94 

Bonds 96, 97 ,98 

Borrowing Capacity 81 

Memorandum of Payments on account of Debt 98 

Treasury Department 99 

Commissioner of Public Buildings (see Public Buildings 

Commissioner) 280 

Commissioner of Streets (see Street Commissioner) 369 

Commissioner of Water (see Water Commissioner) 385 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights, Report of 381 

Inspection of Wiring in Buildings 381 

Fire Alarm System 382 

Police Signal System 383 

Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets 383 

Street Lighting 384 

Recommendations 384 

Conclusion 384 

Eire Department, Chief of, Report of 40£ 

Alarms of Fire 40£ 

List of Probable Causes 40£ 

Manual Force 41] 

Apparatus , 411 

Hose 411 

Resume 412 

Recommendations 412 

Conclusion 413 

Health, Board of, Report of 137 

Organization, Officers, etc 137 

Nuisances 138 

Permits and Licenses 138 

Stables 139 

Board of Infants 140 

Deaths 144 

Mortality Statistics 141 

Diseases Dangerous to Public Health 146 

Specimens and Supplies 146 



41$ ANNUAL REPORTS 

Medical Inspection of Schools 147 

Bacteriological Department 149 

Undertakers , 149 

Examination of Plumbers 149 

Health Nurses, Report of 150, 151 

Medical Inspection, Report of 153 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 156 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 160 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Report of 156 

Inspector of Buildings (see Public Buildings Commissioner) 280 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, Report of the 160 

City Physician, Report of 295 

Law Department, Report of 296 

Licensing Commission, Report of 303 

Medical Inspection, Report of 153 

Visits 153 

Contagious Disease Hospital 153 

Laboratory Examinations 153 

Tuberculosis 154 

Infant Hygiene Clinics 155 

Ordinances 325 

Planning Board, Report of 404 

Organization 404 

Zoning 404 

Recommendations 405 

Appropriations 407 

Mystic River Development 407 

Police, Chief of, Report of 305 

Arrests 305 

Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 305 

Crimes and Offenses Against Property 305 

Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order 306 

Recapitulation 307 

Roster of Department 310 

Changes in the Force 312 

Liquor Officers, Report of 314 

Police Matron, Report of 316 

Automobile and Traffic Department 317 

Conclusion 317 

Population 293,324 



INDEX 417 

Public Buildings Commissioner, Report of 280 

Inspection of Buildings 280 

Coal „ 283 

Elevators 283 

School Buildings 283 

Fire Department Buildings 286 

Municipal Buildings , 286 

Libraries 286 

Water, Highway, Sanitary and Sewer Buildings 287 

Hospital Buildings 287 

Police Buildings 288 

Bath House 288 

In General 288 

Public Grounds (City Engineer) 351 

Public Library 164 

Board of Trustees and Officers — Committees 164 

Organization of Library and Staff Personnel 165 

Report of Trustees 168 

Report of Librarian 169 

Statistics 176 

Public Welfare, Department of 289 

Members of the Board, Committees, Officers, etc 289 

Report of General Agent 291 

Full Support 291 

Partial Support 291 

Aid Under 1913 Law (Mothers' Aid) 291 

Cost to City 291 

Reimbursements 292 

Somerville Hospital 292 

Population and Gross Expenditures 292 

Overseers of the Poor Since 1885 293 

Recapitulation 293 

City Home, Report of Warden 294 

City Physician, Report of 295 

Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 100 

Financial Statement 135 

Sanitary Department, Report of 402 

Collection of Ashes and Paper 402 

School Department 179 

Superintendent of Schools, Report of 182 

Appendix, Contents of 215 

Accomodations 182 

Dental Dispensary 213 

Graduates — High School 250 

Junior High Schools 255 

Vocational Schools 264 

High School Athletic Association 210 



418 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Report of Head Master, High School 204 

" Director of Thrift 191 

School Committees, 1924-1925 180, 264 

School Nurses 214 

Somerville Teachers' Association 208 

Somerville Teachers' Club 209 

Teachers in Service 267 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Report of 300 

Sewers (see City Engineer) 347 

Street Commissioner, Report of , 369 

Appropriations 369 

Highway Maintenance 370 

Snow and Ice 370 

Bridges 371 

Street Railways 371 

Underground Wires 371 

Crushed Stone 372 

Sidewalks Maintenance 372 

Street Sprinkling 372 

Street Cleaning 372 

Suppression of Moths 373 

Shade Trees 373 

Highways Construction, New Streets 377 

Sidewalks Construction 375, 377 

Streets Constructed in 1925 374 

Highways Construction, Permanent Pavement 377 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing 378 

Miscellaneous 378 

Permits 379 

Recommendations 379 

Traffic Control 379 

Public and Private Streets 355 

Water Commissioner, Report of 385 

Revenue and Expenditures 387 

Cost of Water Works 388 

Water Works Income and Distribution 389 

Water Distribution System, Construction 389 

Hydrants, Gates, etc 390 

Water Services 391 

Water Meters 392 

Summary of Pipes and Fixtures 394 

Water Assessments and Consumption 395 

Construction, Maintenance, Operation 397 

Northern Traffic Artery 397 

Water Consumption 397 

Water Rate Collections 398 

Summary of Statistics 400 

Financial Statistics 401